Reputation
Next privilege 250 Rep.
View close votes
Badges
5
Newest
 Commentator
Impact
0 people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 109 votes cast
Aug
18
comment Suggested alternatives for that horrible new noun 'nice-to-have'?
"Desirable" is exactly the word I'd use to describe a "nice-to-have" feature. Good job on suggesting the emphasis.
Jul
21
comment word or term for letting someone else have a chance to win
In terms of "playing at their level" it means exactly that, so yes, very good answer.
Jul
21
comment word or term for letting someone else have a chance to win
I'd agree with @anotherdave - but I believe the meaning is more like "don't beat / embarrass me too badly". Going easy on someone doesn't necessarily mean you have any intention of letting them win.
Jul
21
answered word or term for letting someone else have a chance to win
May
11
awarded  Commentator
May
11
comment What's a correct expression for professions in which you do a lot of sitting?
A limo driver sits, but you wouldn't describe that as a desk job, would you?
May
11
comment What's a correct expression for professions in which you do a lot of sitting?
@HotLicks It might be uncommon in the US, but the world is rather larger than that. Besides, the examples were only to illustrate there are jobs where you're seated, but not at a desk.
May
11
comment What's a correct expression for professions in which you do a lot of sitting?
@HotLicks Driving commercial vehicles and working on a checkout are examples of "sitting" professions - neither are desk jobs.
Apr
24
awarded  Critic
Apr
24
comment What is the action called when a grumpy old man shows that he is annoyed, by making a 'throat-clearing' sound?
Does this question need to be ageist and sexist? "Harrumphing" isn't limited to either group...
Jan
2
comment Are “smell like” and “smell of” the same?
True from my (UK) perspective. Using another simple example you could say something like "You smell of beer" or "You smell like a brewery" but "You smell of a brewery" would sound incorrect to most ears.
Dec
3
comment How to give a tip without using 'Keep the change'
This is the approach I use (I'm from / live in the UK) for tipping taxi drivers or my barber etc. For example, if a taxi fare is £3.70, I might say "Just call it a fiver." - though the usage isn't always for tipping - often it's just to get convenient change instead of receiving several low value coins back.
Aug
25
answered What do you call a blanket used for moving?
Aug
25
comment What do you call a blanket used for moving?
From my experience in the UK, I'd also call them moving blankets. As you called out, a furniture pad would usually refer to an anti-scuff device for chair legs and other similar applications.
Apr
16
comment A word for old-fashioned, dirty bar/place (spit-and-sawdust)
Also common to British English from my own experiences. I've visited many dives.
Apr
11
answered Are there metaphoric English expressions meaning “keeping composure at a fatal moment, never panicky”?
Mar
21
awarded  Supporter
Feb
19
awarded  Teacher
Feb
19
comment Is technical copywriting jargon or style?
I made no judgement as to whether or not jargon was perjorative. Only that overly technical terms that are not in general use outside a given profession could often be expressed in plain English.
Feb
18
comment Is technical copywriting jargon or style?
@horatio: Perhaps they aren't the best examples, but there are plenty of terms that could easily be replaced with plain English. Intravenous anyone?