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Feb
24
comment Is “prepone” being used outside India?
It is used outside of India: Indian students use it with me constantly (I'm a professor in the US). I think it will eventually get thoroughly exported in the same way as "doubt" now has a new meaning because of Indian students.
Feb
20
comment What is the difference between “dominant” and “predominant”?
We can probably just shut down the entire forum then.
Jan
8
comment Is “forwent” used much?
Years after asking this question, I still find it fascinating: "I go, I went, I have gone" have all remained in common usage; "I forgo, I forwent, I have forgone" are likewise common except "forwent" which has been discarded for some reason. The answer above claims it (and it alone in its family?) serves no useful purpose.
Aug
28
comment Is “a ways to go” grammatically correct?
Does this mean "means" is singular too? As in "Ways and Means Committee"?
Jul
5
comment Is there any difference in meaning between 'efficacy' and 'efficiency'?
Googling for the difference between these words lands you here at the top result. And this gives a concise description of the difference (rather than requiring a reading of two definitions and then a mental comparison), so thanks to the OP for asking.
Feb
15
comment Better phrase for “not throwing good money after bad”
"Cost/benefit analysis" fits my aim perfectly, but your (nearly) original phrase has an irresistible alliteration.
Feb
15
comment Better phrase for “not throwing good money after bad”
Although I think I asked my question poorly, this is exactly what I was looking for.
Feb
15
comment Better phrase for “not throwing good money after bad”
The attribute is his quality of foregoing self-satisfaction in favor of saving money. There are a number of excellent alternatives offered below in the answers section, all of which are superior to my attempts above.
Oct
20
comment What does “vampiric” mean in this context?
I guess that I, having missed the Twilight saga, am lacking in what "simple" attributes vampires have these days.
Oct
11
comment What is the opposite of “multitasking?”
Regarding your edit: you may not perceive "non-multitasking" as awkward, but using @JLG's NGram link, I added this term and it was essentially unused. I am going with "single-tasking" for now.
Oct
11
comment What is the opposite of “multitasking?”
I need the antonym in a computer science document, and "non-multitasking" is quite stilted. "Concentrating" would have a very low probability of being correctly construed by my reader to mean "one task at a time".
Jul
25
comment What is the meaning and usage of the word “beknownst”?
Superseded, not superceded.
Jun
29
comment When can one use a contraction at the end of a sentence?
My question isn't a dupe, but the top answer to your linked question answers my question. Shall I delete?
May
23
comment Is ‘misunderestimate’ a received (American) English word?
In fairness to our feckless ex-president, in watching the video tape of this Bushism, it seems to me he is saying, "They mis... underestimated me." I imagined that he had started to say, "They misjudged me" or something similar, but then changed it.
Apr
27
comment Is “forwent” used much?
@BarrieEngland: "Since I was sick yesterday, I forwent jogging." Try all of your suggested words in its place: none works. Try any other English word or phrase of two syllables or less. I still am not seeing that it "serves no useful purpose" as your answer claims.
Apr
25
comment Is “forwent” used much?
I wonder if the respondent here could elaborate on his claim that the word serves no useful purpose. Is there another word that is equivalent and preferred?
Sep
28
comment Is “obscure” the same as “undocumented”?
@Karl: I believe people in technical circles do talk about documentation that nobody knows about: they call it "poorly documented".
Sep
27
comment Is “obscure” the same as “undocumented”?
@drɱ: not trying to hyper-analyze, merely trying to understand. I suppose if respondent had said "well documented" I would have had no cause to wonder about this question, so your answer points out something valuable.
Sep
21
comment Can “whore” mean “to hoard things”?
@emragins: I had both "the undying" and "the immortal" from Nax! Oh, and a bear mount from Zul'Aman!
Sep
20
comment Can “whore” mean “to hoard things”?
When I google "quit whoring all the" I get 60 hits; one example: "quit whoring all the cookies and beer!" Are these people just conflating "whore" and "hoard" then?