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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 71 votes cast
Jan
5
comment How to congratulate regarding an event
I'm not a grammar expert, but I think "congratulations for" would really need to be followed by a gerund... e.g. "congratulations for graduating", "congratulations for passing your exams" etc. But even those sound a bit strange to me.
Jan
5
comment How to congratulate regarding an event
"Congratulations for (anything)" is a very unusual phrase to use, at least in British English--don't think I've ever heard it, nor would I use it.
Dec
21
answered A word for people who resist change
Sep
28
answered Does “I need it by September 30th” mean deadline 24:00 the 30th, or deadline 24:00 29th?
Aug
21
comment How to know how to pronounce an “-e” ending based on spelling?
It does, though in English people tend to pronounce it the same way as the (Italian) musical term "forte".
May
16
comment What is a person (not a company) who provides a service called?
Disagree with "in general". A consultant provides a very specific kind of professional service. If that service is house-cleaning, car maintenance or teaching, to use the OP's examples, they would not normally be described as a consultant.
Jan
13
comment Difference between “game” and “sport”
Horse racing is one of the least sport-like "sports" of all, existing as it does almost entirely as a spectacle for people to bet on. Without bookmakers, there would be virtually no audience for horse racing at all, and it would almost completely die out.
May
8
comment A word for a joke so poorly told and so unfunny that one cannot help but laugh
You can flub a perfectly good joke though, and while flubbing any kind of joke might sometimes be funny for the audience, it can certainly provoke more negative reactions too.
Dec
9
comment When does thousand turn into thousands?
And personally, I don't expect "thousands" to mean more than twenty thousand, either. At that point, you're talking about "tens of thousands", then "hundreds of thousands" etc.
Dec
2
comment What is the best way to describe someone who is very social in a party?
What I generally call them isn't fit to print on a family website :)
Nov
27
comment Euphemism for poo
Though in British English, "relieving himself" would generally indicate urination rather than defecation.
Nov
27
comment Euphemism for poo
While I've certainly heard it used to mean a few different things, it's also worth noting that in British English, "relieving oneself" almost always means urinating rather than any other bodily function.
Nov
22
comment Why “e.g.” and not “f.e.”? Why “i.e.” and not “t.i.”?
As another native English speaker, the easiest way I always found to remember which is which is that 'eg' is pretty much the same sound as the first syllable of 'example'.
Nov
7
comment What's the opposite of a “round number”?
Caveat: "Sharp number" is a very uncommonly-used term, at least in British English. In 42 years as a native speaker (some of which included taking university-level mathematics and physics classes), I'm not sure I've ever heard it before. In everyday usage, "exact number" or similar is probably a better choice.
Nov
4
comment Why is the sentence “She sighed, and began whispering again” grammatically incorrect?
To this native English speaker's ears, the one you think doesn't sound quite right actually sounds rather better...
Aug
3
comment Why is “pound” (of weight) abbreviated “lb”?
And prior to decimalisation, of course, a common abbreviation for pounds, shillings and pence was 'l.s.d'.
Jul
26
comment Idiom for magic object (or idea) that fixes everything
@BrianDHall Yeah, to be honest, if someone was sick I think I'd be avoiding all mention of wishing for bullets, silver, magic or otherwise...
Jun
16
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May
8
comment better word for a “delivery guy”
And also here in the UK.
Feb
6
answered “Sound” is to “mute” as “visuals” is to what verb?