420 reputation
27
bio website
location Ireland
age 43
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Aug 17 at 21:23

Interaction Designer since 1993, working in a wide range of fields such as air traffic control, financial markets, virtual reality mockups, and latterly, open source desktop applications.


May
8
comment A word for a joke so poorly told and so unfunny that one cannot help but laugh
You can flub a perfectly good joke though, and while flubbing any kind of joke might sometimes be funny for the audience, it can certainly provoke more negative reactions too.
Dec
9
comment When does thousand turn into thousands?
And personally, I don't expect "thousands" to mean more than twenty thousand, either. At that point, you're talking about "tens of thousands", then "hundreds of thousands" etc.
Dec
2
comment What is the best way to describe someone who is very social in a party?
What I generally call them isn't fit to print on a family website :)
Nov
27
comment Euphemism for poo
Though in British English, "relieving himself" would generally indicate urination rather than defecation.
Nov
27
comment Euphemism for poo
While I've certainly heard it used to mean a few different things, it's also worth noting that in British English, "relieving oneself" almost always means urinating rather than any other bodily function.
Nov
22
comment Why “e.g.” and not “f.e.”? Why “i.e.” and not “t.i.”?
As another native English speaker, the easiest way I always found to remember which is which is that 'eg' is pretty much the same sound as the first syllable of 'example'.
Nov
7
comment What's the opposite of a “round number”?
Caveat: "Sharp number" is a very uncommonly-used term, at least in British English. In 42 years as a native speaker (some of which included taking university-level mathematics and physics classes), I'm not sure I've ever heard it before. In everyday usage, "exact number" or similar is probably a better choice.
Nov
4
comment Why is the sentence “She sighed, and began whispering again” grammatically incorrect?
To this native English speaker's ears, the one you think doesn't sound quite right actually sounds rather better...
Aug
3
comment Why is “pound” (of weight) abbreviated “lb”?
And prior to decimalisation, of course, a common abbreviation for pounds, shillings and pence was 'l.s.d'.
Jul
26
comment Idiom for magic object (or idea) that fixes everything
@BrianDHall Yeah, to be honest, if someone was sick I think I'd be avoiding all mention of wishing for bullets, silver, magic or otherwise...
Jun
16
awarded  Yearling
May
8
comment better word for a “delivery guy”
And also here in the UK.
Feb
6
answered “Sound” is to “mute” as “visuals” is to what verb?
Jan
29
comment How do you say “hands-on experience” with this technology to an interviewer?
@Kris I don't understand how this can be considered an oxymoron, there is nothing particularly contradictory about the two words. But even if it is, "practical experience" is nonetheless a phrase with a specific and well-understood meaning in job-hunting and technical circles.
Jan
28
awarded  Editor
Jan
28
revised How do you say “hands-on experience” with this technology to an interviewer?
added 149 characters in body
Jan
28
answered How do you say “hands-on experience” with this technology to an interviewer?
Jan
21
comment What do you call someone who is shy, withdrawn, and fearful of being approached?
Since the OP was looking for a noun, worth noting that "introvert" is the noun for someone who is introverted, and that none of the others on the list really have a noun form.
Dec
16
comment in order to [gerund] or [infinitive]?
Not only is it not necessary, it sounds rather odd.
Nov
11
comment A verb for performing foot tricks with a ball?
Note that to soccer fans at least, "dribbling" is usually done with the ball on the ground at one's feet, and is a basic skill for most professional players. "Juggling" is more of a showing-off activity, and isn't something you'd normally do (or have the chance to do) during a game.