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Apr
16
answered What Does Strike a Chord Mean?
Apr
11
comment A more formal word for “tech-savvy”, relating to IT technologists in particular
Tech-loving is not necessarily tech-knowing, and vice versa. The OP should have picked one of the answers that reflects the same meaning (e.g. "technically proficient").
Apr
10
comment Why are foreign words used in modern vernacular?
+1 for the "Touché!"
Apr
9
answered Punctuation in a series of verb phrases
Apr
4
comment “That… be” construction
Just a nitpick wrt "The conditional mood has largely replaced the subjunctive in English." Though true of English in general, it is somewhat less true for AmE than for BE, I think. In AmE, "if I were a schoolteacher" is perhaps more common than "if I was a schoolteacher." My impression is that BE rarely uses the subjunctive.
Apr
2
comment Phrase for pooling funds with others for a purchase
Almost, but not quite. Chip in on, go in on, etc. do not necessarily have to do with a purchase, which was part of the question.
Apr
2
comment Is “tomfoolery” a gendered word?
Why assume that "Tom" refers to someone male? Talk about gender bias! ;-)
Apr
2
comment What do you call the child who doesn’t resemble his / her parents in English?
We call them children. And we move on.
Apr
2
answered I got first place in a competition where it's possible to tie. How would I distinguish that I was an untied first?
Apr
2
comment What is the difference between deep space and outer space?
Agreed. "Outer space" is really a term from before the sixties and commonplace space travel.
Mar
30
comment Word for not feeling part of a social or economic class
Whoever downvoted this, care to say why?
Mar
30
answered Word for not feeling part of a social or economic class
Mar
30
answered What does the phrase “They would clash with my drapes” mean?
Mar
28
comment What is is called when you count the letters in an acronym, name or word with an ordinal multiplier?
Wrt WWW: Let's not forget the wobblies in the Industrial Workers of the World. Supposedly the nickname came from immigrant members (and most were immigrants) pronouncing "IWW" as "eye wobbily wobbily" or similar.
Mar
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
25
comment Everybody had a different opinion. Is there an idiom for this?
+1. That's it: lack of consensus. No more to be said.
Mar
25
comment Why do we no longer refer to Muslim and Hindu women as being 'in Purdah'?
My apologies; it appears you are right. I thought it was only forbidden in publicly provided spaces such as schools, and for public employees during their hours of employment (e.g. a policeman on duty). Crazy.
Mar
25
comment Why do we no longer refer to Muslim and Hindu women as being 'in Purdah'?
"in France the face covering in public is banned". Nonsense. You'd better check your sources -- they are misleading you grossly. And maybe look up the meaning of "in public".
Mar
25
answered What do people mean or think they mean by “not to scale?”
Mar
24
answered What is the proper English term for polycopié (de cours)?