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21h
comment Word to describe something that opens like a book?
Provide some context for how you are looking to use this word, and you will likely get more help.
21h
comment better word for items on a menu
Choice is what most people in the US would use in this context, I think. Another alternative for your list could be entry.
21h
comment Is “prove the advantages of ” right?
It's OK. Or you might use demonstrate or just show. Might depend on how strong your evidence and argument are, for example.
1d
comment Arrogancy vs. Humility
(Arrogance, not arrogancy.)
Nov
19
comment Is the usage 'literally nuts' correct?
A personal guess is that nuts in the sense of crazy is not (yet) a literal meaning. Now if the currently more literal meaning (as in walnuts) became unused and practically unknown, supplanted by the crazy meaning, then I'd say that that (crazy) meaning is a (even the) literal meaning.
Nov
19
comment Is the usage 'literally nuts' correct?
@code_dweller: I tried to explain it in my last comment. Those meanings come from a figurative application of the nuts-as-in-walnuts meaning. That's my explanation, for what it's worth. Another way to put this might be that there are degrees of literalness. And that is related to the fact that usage changes. Sometimes an originally figurative meaning later takes over to become the most common meaning, so becomes a (or even the) "literal" meaning. Let me add that I'm no expert on this, and no linguist. ...
Nov
19
comment Lost meaning due to constant repetition
The meaning has been diluted, watered down by overuse and inappropriate use.
Nov
19
comment Is the usage 'literally nuts' correct?
@code_dweller: Good question. I would say no, because nuts is not used here to literally mean nuts (as in walnuts). This meaning of nuts is itself essentially figurative (a metaphor: as if the person's brain were a pile of nuts). But that's just my opinion. It's like the expression He's lost his marbles. Even if crazy or demented, he didn't literally lose any marbles. The figure is of someone who has marbles in his head, instead of a healthy brain.
Nov
19
comment Are there words to differentiate two instances of the same season in a year?
The fancier term is winter, 2013-2014.
Nov
19
comment Request: Single word for “barely failing to touch or grasp”
Presumably you mean almost succeeding to touch, or simply almost touching. But that's 2 words, not one.
Nov
19
comment What purpose does capitalization serve in English today?
Good answer, and I didn't even bother to check your link. ;-)
Nov
19
comment Is the usage 'literally nuts' correct?
"Valid intensifier"? What makes an intensifier valid or invalid? If you are not a prescriptionist then presumably you can say only that lots of people use it, not that it is "valid". That's not a usual meaning of the term "valid". Try "popular" or "common".
Nov
19
comment Is the usage 'literally nuts' correct?
Care to explain the downvote?
Nov
19
answered Is the usage 'literally nuts' correct?
Nov
18
comment What does “optic stems” mean?
But the optic stems are behind the eyes. So perhaps the joke includes looking so deeply into her eyes that the person looked past her eyes, almost into her brain, to "see" what she might be thinking. Just an out-of-context guess.
Nov
18
comment Alternative to “thankful for”
"Whenever I see such quotes attributed to, say, Winston Churchill or Mark Twain, I pretty much take it for granted that's unlikely to be true." Yeah, and it's usually Lincoln or Einstein who actually said it.
Nov
18
comment Placement of adjective “only”
Thank you, Nicole. Less than optimally placed "only" is one of my pet peeves (but only one).
Nov
18
comment What does “To get on a high horse” mean?
Just be sure you don't confuse get on a high horse with get high on a horse or, worse yet, get high on a high horse. In the last case, both you and the horse are taking a chance (though perhaps having a good time).
Nov
18
comment Better word or phrase for “very profound”
Very specially extremely profoundly PROFOUND. Deep, what. No single word can do such depth justice.
Nov
18
comment Playing from sheet music
reading music