3,085 reputation
318
bio website
location
age
visits member for 11 months
seen 4 mins ago

42m
comment Is there a word which means whatever you want it to mean? Or has no meaning?
+1! Smurf is the best answer. You can line up your lambdas and your X's and all the rest as contenders, but smurf smurfs to the head of the smurf, every smurfing time.
48m
comment Euphemism for “There's more than one way to skin a cat”
@naught101: Ouch! Proof that barbarism is in the eye (or the knitting needle) of the beholder. Somehow, I can see that image going viral, and even perhaps inspiring a horror film...
12h
comment How come “wise man” and “wise guy” have opposite connotations?
Don't forget wise ass, wiseacre, and weisenheimer.
12h
comment Emissary / Ambassador / Representative / Envoy / Delegate
No one is most important. (And the word is delegate, not deligate.)
12h
comment Is the word “colic” a right word in this context?
Uneasiness, discomfort, bloating, pressure,... Who knows what you are feeling? How to know what it is, from such a vague description? You really need to investigate more, threading your way through thesauri and dictionaries, from word to word, if you cannot describe the symptoms better here.
22h
comment 'Upgradation' not universally accepted?
What Telastyn and FumbleF said! In addition, upgradation is, well, ugly -- sounds awful. Consider avoiding it altogether. (Just one opinion.)
1d
comment If walking across the street unlawfully is jaywalking, is it safe to say biking across the street is jaybiking?
You can coin any word you like. Whether the coin becomes currency depends on whether others use it. Jaybike will be understood.
1d
comment Something happens because clause A, and clause B.
Your multiple-sentence version is clear but choppy. That is the right way to start to express your ideas: short sentences. Often you will then want to smooth things out a bit by combining some of them. Combining also helps pull things together that are logically related. There is nothing wrong with using short, simple sentences, however.
1d
comment Something happens because clause A, and clause B.
Generally, yes. But you can often omit commas if the sense is unambiguous (well understood). This is one reason I said that this is not quite as clear as repeating because (@JohnLawler's suggestion). Commas are there to help translate written text into something you might hear. They are pretty rough tools for that job, in general - all they do is indicate a pause in speech. Word order can often help understanding more than comma placement can. In this case, the simple addition of another because (@JohnLawler's suggestion) makes things quite clear.
1d
comment Do I need to use a comma in this long sentence?
You do not need a comma. You need a new sentence. Or preferably 2 or more sentences. And you can probably drop 3/4 of the words altogether. Here's the key: Step 1 is to figure out your message: what you are trying to tell the reader. Step 2 is to state your message in short, simple, unadorned sentences - no extra clauses, no unnecessary adjectives or adverbs. Step 3 is optional: Combine one or more of the simple sentences, IF that helps instead of hinders understanding. And add qualifiers (adjectives, adverbs) that are important to the exact meaning you want.
1d
comment Something happens because clause A, and clause B.
What @JohnLawler said. An alternative (but not quite as clear) is to remove the comma. That shifts the scope of the because to the conjunction he woke up late AND his bicycle was broken.
1d
comment Is there a more formal word for 'ratting'?
Try a thesaurus: denounce,...
1d
comment Proper technical terms and sentence structure regarding web apps
It's not that there is "something wrong" with set aside. It's that it's not clear what you mean by that. You want to say discontinued or dropped or deprecated or no longer supported. Among terms such as these it depends what you mean. It depends whether you are talking about a released product that is supported or you are talking about current development of something that has not yet been released.
2d
comment Sudden popularity of: obfuscate, why?
@Shahar: And see the Wikipedia article linked to in your own answer. ;-)
2d
comment Sudden popularity of: obfuscate, why?
@Shahar: I shouldn't have sounded so expert; I am not. My understanding is that trying to hide something is not really a secure way of preventing access to it. Obfuscation is not encryption.
2d
comment Simple sentence that I'm not sure is right
It contributed to the decision to start respecting people.
2d
comment What's a better word for “part” in this sentence?
Paying customers.
2d
answered Sudden popularity of: obfuscate, why?
2d
comment Pronunciation of “-” sign, particularly in Unix commands
@tchrist: I disagree. Command-line options (aka switches) for UNIX, Linux, etc. are more commonly read as dash p etc. than either minus p or hypen p. Example.
2d
comment Which of the following works best on a business card?
Why not just use Michael Nguyen? I guess it depends on how you use your business card. If you want to include both Michael and Minh Tran Nhat then use Michael (Minh Tran Nhat) Nguyen or Minh Tran Nhat (Michael) Nguyen. I would not use quote marks for any part of it. This is not a Batman-style aka nickname - this is your name (or at least you should probably think of it that way, even if it is not official).