2,393 reputation
317
bio website
location
age
visits member for 10 months
seen 2 days ago

2d
comment Is it correct to say “I was sure after a year I would get over it”?
Yes, the first is clearly expressed as I was sure that after a year I would get over it. And the second is clearly expressed as I was sure after a year that I would get over it.
2d
comment Is it alright to list more than three things in a sentence?
Right. So maybe (OP) ask your teacher whether s?he is prescribing a rule for correct English usage (e.g. a grammar rule) or a rule of style for better communication, or something else. IOW, ask what this rule amounts to, what it is intended to accomplish.
2d
comment Notice that name is singular
This answer reflects my (inexpert) thoughts too. My guess is that other answers here completely missed the boat. I think it would be in the name of even if we were talking about Superman instead of a hypothetical holy trinity: in the name of truth, justice, and the American Way...
2d
comment What's a single word for the context a word is used in (used to differentiate similar words)?
Maybe you are looking for connotation? Two words with similar meanings can have slightly different connotations, and this difference sometimes depends on the context.
2d
comment Might the use of the word “where” be inapt in these three sentences?
@jwpat7 Not clear to me what you are saying. The last sentence of my post says that you cannot fix the A phobia is where... phrase by simply substituting whereby for where. But you can fix it by saying A phobia is a condition whereby... That "works", AFAIK.
Jul
22
comment Double apostrophe-s?
@tchrist: FWIW, a parking in French is a parking lot in AmEn and a car park in BrEn.
Jul
21
answered How to refer back to the final sentence of the last paragraph?
Jul
21
comment Might the use of the word “where” be inapt in these three sentences?
@jwpat7: Who's proposing to use "whereby as formal equivalent of where"? My post says something quite different: neither is a substitute for the other; they are not equivalent. For the rest, the text you cite just makes the point that whereby is no longer well known / recognized. My point was not to use whereby but that such uses of where might well occur because whereby (which would be correct) was replaced by where (which is not, here).
Jul
21
awarded  Civic Duty
Jul
21
answered Might the use of the word “where” be inapt in these three sentences?
Jul
21
comment “Evocative” vs. “provocative”
@tchrist said it. Nothing more to say.
Jul
21
comment Finished off the night “with a rubber”
@BrianDonovan: "Rubber for condom has all but disappeared from AmE by now." Sorry, I think that is an exaggeration. Do you have some support for the claim? I don't have proof to the contrary, but there is this, at least.
Jul
21
comment Meaning of “But I repeat myself” in Mark Twain's quote?
@YoichiOishi: IOW, if you have already said that someone is an idiot then adding that the person is also a member of Congress would be redundant.
Jul
20
comment Rule for when to use “thin” versus “narrow”
+1 for the question!
Jul
20
answered Rule for when to use “thin” versus “narrow”
Jul
20
comment What is the difference between a 'rocket' and a 'missile'
@DavidRicherby To my mind at least, a ball rolling across the floor can be a missile. And even a cannonball moving through space ballistically might well have a plane (2D) trajectory. Anyway...
Jul
20
answered What is the difference between a 'rocket' and a 'missile'
Jul
19
comment “Most of them plant based”
+1 for mentioning the hyphen and the fact that this is a good example of how it can help clarify the text.
Jul
19
answered Word for someone who is hungry for power and control
Jul
19
answered Recommended replacement for 'literally'?