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seen Apr 11 at 13:15

Feb
18
comment Is “agreeance” a proper word?
It has a closer connection to Scotch (or Scottish, if you find the proper Scotch offensive) Law. It still originates in Old French, but it came into English usage through Law French, like Assize, Oyer and Terminer, and so forth did.
Feb
18
comment Is “delegable” a word?
Proper and correct it may be, but it still sounds more descriptive of a table from Ikea than a task one can hand off to somebody else.
Feb
18
comment Is “agreeance” a proper word?
Always remember that dictionaries are descriptive, not prescriptive -- unless they declare themselves to be otherwise (like Noah Webster's "let's change all the spellings" offering).
Feb
18
comment What's the difference between “mirror” and “looking glass”?
I have, but it has always been an allusion to the world Lewis Carol created, where things are different ways than just being reversed left-to-right. It's not unlike telling folks that they are no longer in Kansas.
Feb
18
comment “I watched anime 3 days straight” — what does it mean?
Although with anime, as with gaming, it may actually mean seventy-two continuous hours with fewer breaks than the Guinness Records people would allow for marathon activity and, um, less-than-fastidious hygiene ;o)
Feb
18
comment Is the word 'hussler' appropriate?
It's the same word -- the double-ess spelling is a hip-hop-esque misspelling. It's jess kooler 2 stick it to the man than to use a dictionary.
Feb
18
comment Is “litter” correct on waste bins?
One may also place what was once litter in a litter bin. That makes the waters even less clear -- the bin is there to move the litter into, but once the litter is placed in the bin it is no longer litter. Norman... coördinate...
Feb
18
comment Does any of English dialects engage non-English foreign letters in their alphabets?
The rôle of rôle is now being played by role. I never like it when they change the actors mid-series.
Feb
18
comment Does any of English dialects engage non-English foreign letters in their alphabets?
It was certainly standard usage in Canada and the UK in the '60s and earlier.
Feb
18
comment Is “there're” (similar to “there's”) a correct contraction?
It is rendered that way in speech, but it's an elision -- there are two distinct r sounds, the a has become a schwa, and only the glottal stop is missing. You might want to emphasize that elision when writing dialogue (to make sure that the reader's inner voice hears the pattern) but there's nothing actually left out to record as such. I guess it would be a stylistic decision, but I don't see it becoming a part of informal writing outside of a dialogue. (But then, I'm often wrong.)
Feb
18
comment What does “beggars belief” mean?
It is a perfectly cromulent word.
Feb
18
comment Is it “dressing” if I cooked my “stuffing” outside of the turkey?
Until recently in Canada, it would be dressing regardless. The term "stuffing" was one I never heard except on the very occasional television show originating in the United States that featured a turkey dinner, and it didn't become anything like common until the Stove Top brand made it to the supermarket shelves. These days, there's a distinct generational divide -- the same divide we see between users of "sofa" and "chesterfield" (lower-case in the generic).
Feb
18
comment “Good night” or “good evening”?
"Good evening" has historically been a way of saying goodbye as well, but in modern usage both "good evening" and "good day" used as a goodbye is almost always a form of dismissal rather than a mere parting (particularly when accompanied by a formal form of address, e.g., "good evening to you, sir!").
Feb
17
comment Does 'soi-disant' have a close English equivalent?
Both of these have negative connotations (unless the person in question has an entitlement to appoint himself/herself to a real position). You can, for instance, style yourself a bon vivant or raconteur in order to help others get a handle on your personality without claiming anything to which you are not entitled. "So-called" and "self-appointed" automatically put the truth of the claim in dispute.
Feb
17
comment “The thing is, is that…”
Let us try to keep in mind, though, that blackboard grammar is artificial (as is written language in general) -- especially in English, where many of our formalised rules were imposed by people who thought English should be more like Greek and Latin. Things like pauses and repetitions probably ought not to appear in formal writing, but dialogue (whether live or written) would be quite alien without them.
Feb
17
comment What is the meaning of “ugg”?
It's also deliciously ironic. It might well have been posted as, "You're speling is attroshus!"
Feb
17
comment “Most every” and “almost every”
...and regional.
Feb
16
comment The word 'Yahoo'
I'd put it sometime before the 1970s -- the Yahoo were named after their yells, not the other way around. Since the name for the Houhynyms is onomatopoeic (it's rendered as "whinny" in standard English) it's likely that yahoo was current boorishness in Swift's time.
Feb
16
comment The word 'Yahoo'
Not legendary beings, just people acting naturally, without the appearance of wisdom and dignity that technology lends us. Likewise, the Houhynym were nothing more than horses.
Feb
16
comment Is technical copywriting jargon or style?
The definition of jargon does not imply the nobody can understand it, but that it is language that cannot be easily understood by people outside of the group. Jargon terms are usually the most clear, precise and succinct language you can use to talk to people within the group, but to an outsider it is usually baffling. In the case of prepend, we have created an artificial term that is meaningless outside of the "in group", since to append means merely to add -- it does not have a positional implication; it can be prepositional or postpositional.