9,089 reputation
2537
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 12 hours ago

Nov
8
comment Definition: Twofold, Threefold and Fourfold
Think, people! My double-pronged fork has two prongs, not one prong that's twice as long as a normal prong. I'm really getting tired of the idiocy around here.
Nov
8
comment Definition: Twofold, Threefold and Fourfold
@guifa — "Two ways of being important" is also double a single way of being important. Doubly important does not necessarilly imply "important in a single way, but with twice the intensity of importance".
Nov
8
answered Definition: Twofold, Threefold and Fourfold
Nov
7
comment “That is what I told her.” “That was what I told her.” Meanings are different?
Well, telling her happened in the past, so you can use was. However, it is also true that what you told her is still what you told her, so you can also use is. The only thing that is definitively in the past, always, is told, since the telling happened in the past.
Nov
7
comment what is an equivalent for 'fitna'?
This is a case where it would be highly unlikely for English (or any other non-Arabic) language to develop or adopt a single-word equivalent precisely because of all of the historical associations and implications that accompany the Arabic word. If English were to adopt and assimilate Fitna or if a new word were to be created to mean the same thing, it would quickly assume a uniquely English meaning based on usage and context that would still be missing most of the nuance you are looking for.
Nov
7
answered regarding the phrase “carry perspective” and “carry standpoint”
Nov
7
answered “That is what I told her.” “That was what I told her.” Meanings are different?
Nov
6
comment I am a sponsor. Do I call the person I sponsor a “sponsee”?
@Oldcat - At least in the 12-step world (AA, NA, etc.), where the term sponsee originated, the anonymity of the person in question is sacrosanct, so names are out of the question, and longer phrases such as the person that I am sponsoring quickly become unwieldy in conversation. It is an ugly coinage, but in that world it's a necessary one. I wouldn't use it outside of that context, though.
Nov
5
comment Stingy, miserly and frugal: what is the difference in usage?
Actually, @choster, this answer, when expanded, would be better than most of the existing answers, and the three sentences there now neatly encapsulate the nuances of the three words better than the more elaborate answers do. I'm upping (to bring it back to zero), and would encourage the user to elaborate upon this answer rather than abandon it.
Nov
3
comment Why are there no male or female terms for cousins in English?
I was already aware of that when writing; German also retains gender elsewhere in the language, often in non-obvious ways (that is, the word itself carries no signs of gender, but articles and modifiers do). It is, therefore, not germane to the gender in English question.
Nov
3
answered Why are there no male or female terms for cousins in English?
Oct
19
comment Marriage between close relatives
There are, in fact, two sets of taboos: affinity and consanguinity. Consanguinity is about blood relationships; affinity covers the "that's just weird" set (like marrying a stepmother or stepdaughter, where there is no blood relationship but there is an equivalent social relationship). (Charming related movie: 1959's The Bridal Path.)
Oct
6
comment Why is there an “a” in “beggar”? Why not an “e”?
@tchrist - I didn't say when it was coined, just that it's not formed from a regular action/actor relationship. (It would have been about the same time as uncouth, rude and homely all meant more-or-less the same thing.)
Oct
5
comment Why is there an “a” in “beggar”? Why not an “e”?
Beg as a verb is an uncouth neologism, though. It's not that "someone who begs is a beggar", but that some idiot in the past decided that someone who is a beggar must, by some extension, be engaged in begging. It's rather like someone saying that a motor motes.
Oct
1
comment Why is the letter after “Mc” in names capitalized?
Re: Fitz - It being a mark of (acknowledged) bastardy might have a little something to do with the diminution of the father's name.
Oct
1
comment Different way to refer to a 'lowercase' letter?
The complement to initial is body. Minuscule and majuscule are lettering styles, and do not necessarily correspond to lowercase and uppercase, since the entire text can be written or set in one or the other (viz. Carolingian minuscule). It happens to be the case that in most current typefaces, uppercase letters are majuscules and lowercase letters are minuscules, but it's not necessarily the case.
Sep
30
comment Why do people often say 'hambag' for 'handbag'?
@Araucaria - No, in English I would expect the m to go to n in that assimilation (the alternative would be to have the d go to b, which has a weak analogue in ð going to v in Cockney, but defricatizing is more prevalent than labializing). Oddly enough, grammatical components are often better preserved than root components. The point was that assimilation happens.
Sep
30
comment Why do people often say 'hambag' for 'handbag'?
In the case of hanbag, the n is just dying to become an m. It's the same reason why we have the word impossible, when the early Latin was inpossibilis. The Principle of Least Effort (er, laziness) dictated that the word should become either impossibilis or intossibilis, and since it needed to remain opposite to possibilis, the t thing couldn't work.
Sep
30
comment Figurative usage of “astride”
Centred around?
Sep
30
comment Figurative usage of “astride”
Astride is almost always a reference to riding (or at least sitting on something as if to ride it), and while sidebands may be figuratively "riding" a carrier, this may be taking the metaphor just a bit too far. If you are talking about modulated RF, why not call the carrier the, um, carrier, which frees up centred (which would be an awkward repetition in the current formulation)?