567 reputation
313
bio website tankadillo.com
location Columbia, SC
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Jul 29 '12 at 3:01

Mar
12
comment Is there a more fancy name for a “kitchen hole”?
I clicked this question wondering what in the world a "kitchen hole" could be.
Feb
28
comment What is the difference between illegal and unlawful?
+1 for the Grammar Girl article. Very interesting.
Feb
28
comment Quotations that skip paragraphs
Doing this will definitely make your writing much more readable.
Feb
21
comment Is it correct to say “cold temperature”?
Temperatures, prices, speeds, volumes, etc are all things that we measure, so we tend to think of them in terms of numbers. Thus why we say "high" or "low" when describing them. A temperature of 0 is colder than a temperature of 100, and 0 is lower than 100. All of the examples you listed sound natural to my ear. The only times when it doesn't work to say "high" or "low" is when the metaphor could be taken literally. You wouldn't say "the size of the house is really high" because it's unclear whether you mean the house is tall or not.
Feb
21
comment Is it correct to say “cold temperature”?
Temperature is a property of a beverage. Just as it may have a large volume and a dark color, it can have a cold temperature. Saying "the beverage is cold" has the same meaning as "the beverage has a cold temperature," it's just a matter of diction.
Feb
21
comment What does ‘government shutdown’ mean exactly?
Well, it is supposed to have a negative implication. A "government shut down" is a bad thing. In political discussion it's common to even hear people refer to it as an offensive tactic: "they're threatening to cause a government shutdown"
Feb
10
comment Is the phrase “fire and brimstone” used by Americans or it is only in Bible?
It's good to note that its use isn't limited to religious situations. "The teacher gave a fire-and-brimstone talk to the mischievous boys."
Feb
6
comment Mnemonic for remembering how to spell “mnemonic”
It's easier for me to remember "the way it sounds plus an extra M" than to remember another mnemonic.
Feb
6
comment Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms?
RPG, when spoken, sounds like "are pee jee," thus it's prefixed with an "an."
Feb
3
comment “I'm right, aren't I?”
It's good to note that "ain't" originally meant the same thing as "amn't" before its meaning shifted to mean "is not" and was eventually banned from formal English. Since we need something to fill its gap and amn't never caught on we say "aren't" instead.
Feb
2
comment Literary techniques involving sound
This isn't homework is it? It might be helpful if you could explain the context of the question.
Jan
31
comment What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
I remember being told once that it's supposed to sound like "what's this here" mumbled and slurred together. Such as if a confused person looked at the sauce, pointed to it, and said "what's this here sauce?"
Jan
30
comment Which one is correct to say: “It's me” or “It's I”?
When I was little my mother took a pen to a children's book and replaced every instance of "it's me" with "it's I." That didn't stop me from using the former though in conversation.
Jan
29
comment Why does “impregnable” mean *cannot be impregnated*?
Personally, I can't remember ever seeing "impregnable" used to mean "cannot be impregnated." It seems like a simple mistake though given its morphology.
Jan
29
comment Is there an informal way to describe a woman that can not have a baby?
This is just like how there's no polite single word for "to have sex with." The only way to say "he [verb that means sex]ed her" in polite company is through a euphemism such as "slept with."
Jan
28
comment Is “fastly” a correct word?
Are you sure about this? I find "I ran fast" to sound grammatically incorrect, but that may just be the strict (and sometimes wrong) education I was raised on. I wouldn't feel comfortable writing that in a formal situation.
Jan
27
comment Has technology slowed or stopped the development of the core English language?
The future generation will have no idea that "fail" was once a verb.
Jan
26
comment When to use “GOP” versus “Republican Party”
Good point. I hadn't thought of that.
Jan
25
comment When to use “GOP” versus “Republican Party”
Interesting info about the WSJ's official and de-facto stances.