25,642 reputation
838105
bio website http://-
location United States
age 42
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 1 hour ago

native speaker of American English (AmE)


1h
comment Does the word “wizardry” have negative connotations?
I take it as a pejorative. 'Sorcerer' is definitely a compliment since it is reserved for the most powerful. All that Harry Potter crap really distorted a lot of things for the sake of the story.
2h
comment When an author lets you decide what happened?
'Choose your own adventure'?
16h
comment I'm looking for a word that is the noun-form of “poorly-constructed” and ends with the -ation suffiix
NG: OK, but are you looking at what I say in context? So, where are you getting your suggestions? Google?
16h
comment I'm looking for a word that is the noun-form of “poorly-constructed” and ends with the -ation suffiix
NG: Where are you getting your suggestions? They all seem to be nearby but just outside the ballpark. A fabrication is something built (metaphorically used to mean a lie), with no connotation of poorly- or well-built.
20h
awarded  Notable Question
22h
comment How to understand 'flatter to deceive'?
@landroni: I don't know what would be most natural in French. But it is the general concepts that matter, not the expression. Flattery, appealing to someone's pride (or however one might explain or translate) can be used to mislead or deceive someone else by taking advantage of that pride. 'to' can be explicated by 'in order to' or 'to bring about'.
22h
comment One has to cook himself or themself?
@Charles: I have no idea what you're saying. In everyday usage, one commonly uses 'cook for'; 'cook by' is rare and means something special. Since the OP doesn't specify anything at all, the former is better, whatever the meanings and ambiguities you can come up with. I am saying this for non-native speakers (like the OP), so that they won't make the mistake of saying something that means something else than what they meant.
1d
comment How to understand 'flatter to deceive'?
Landroni: the expression when translated would work on any language (assuming they have words like 'to flatter' and 'to mislead'
1d
comment One has to cook himself or themself?
To say 'to cook by oneself' means that one is alone in cooking. It might imply cooking for your own meal or for someone else. That's ambiguity. Can you explain the ambiguity with 'for'?
1d
comment Time for a new universal language or radical evolution of English
Fascinating question, just a bit too broad and speculative for here.
1d
comment Etymology: the wings of a bird
@rogermue I don't get your point. JL shows how there is an accepted reference that distinguishes the wing and swing. You're talking about wing and wind. Is all you're saying is that AHD maybe has mistakes?
2d
comment Is the tense change of the verb “need” to “needed” mandatory?
What is 'regression of the verb' supposed to mean (whether it in fact exists or not)?
2d
comment One has to cook himself or themself?
"cook for oneself". (If you don't know the gender)
2d
comment Is there a word to describe the state of being the only one of something?
If we're being metaphorical, then sui generis is another way of saying the same thing.
2d
comment Is there a word to describe the state of being the only one of something?
Those are two very different suggestions. One I like the other I don't.
2d
comment Is the use of future tense (especially “will” and “shall”) going out of grammar?
Is your teacher a native speaker of English? I have never heard or uttered or can imagine either for 'I am to go...' for present, future, continuous subjunctive whatever. Use "I'm going to go to London" or more formally "I will go to London".
2d
comment What is the most precise antonym of “talent”?
Perfect pitch is learned.
2d
comment Drinking alcohol after work
Neither of those are answers to the OP. Also, how do those ngram/google book links support a definition? (neither of those do so in particular anyway).
Apr
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
17
comment Merry Easter to all of you!
@Waggers: Neither that question nor any of the answers are directed towards this question. That just talks about what, not why. Why not 'Merry' with 'Easter'?