Reputation
32,796
Next tag badge:
360/400 score
95/80 answers
Badges
12 56 138
Newest
 Necromancer
Impact
~3.0m people reached

6h
comment What is the oldest common English word?
Please define 'age of a word'. I think it is not possible to do so coherently. Must it be written? Then is the age of the word the age of the oldest manuscript in which it appears? Also, define English or are you counting words that came from Latin (before 1066)? or proto-Germanic/proto IE? I think the problem is 'attestable' since 'the' may very well be 'older' than 'one', it's just that 'one' has more cognates in other IE languages.
6h
comment Resources for native Anglo-Saxon vocabulary building.
THere's probably no such resource since the scholarship necessary to determine the source language would also not place a value of one over the other. Use a dictionary that gives etymology (like the OED or etymonline) and if your word isn't Germanic (borrowed or assimilated after 1066), then look in a thesaurus for synonyms and then check source langauge and repeat.
18h
comment What does the word 'mandles' mean?
Words can have many meanings. Also, new ones can be made up
1d
comment The meaning of 0% and 100% as opposed to other percentages?
Legal issues are often linguistic ones. 100% means 'absolutely all', but 90%, 99%, 99.99% can mean varying degrees of 'almost all'.
1d
answered How do treaties and pacts differ?
1d
comment Does the indefinite article “an” apply to vowel sounds from foreign languages?
The rule in English is.... well, you know it. So if the foreign word, as pronounced by an English speaker, starts with a 'yuh' or 'wuh' sound then it is 'a'.
2d
comment I didn't come here for an argument
See programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/186293/…
2d
comment Is it “Victory is mine” or “Victory is mines”?
@chaslyfromUK it is valid only in the bizarre circumstances of a joke ('mines' = stationary movement triggered explosives), so most people wouldn't understand you without that context.
2d
comment Is it grammatically correct to say “Year of built”?
'Year of built' is wrong grammatically ('built' is a past participle/verb not a noun). 'Year of build' is ostensibly correct with appropriate context ('build' can be used as a noun, but it is a newer usage) but is just not used. You can say 'year of construction' (and that sounds perfectly OK in a sentence). But do you want to place a marker on a building? Then you'd say 'Built 1922' or just '1922' and people know that it was the year of construction (or when construction ended).
2d
comment Maxims that have to do with persistence?
@Kyle 'Slow and steady wins the race' is what you are looking for. It doesn't just mean 'slow and careful is better than rushing' but also that 'perseverance' or 'persistence' is the winning factor.
Aug
28
comment The pronunciation rules of words which begin 'Com-, Col-, Cor-' or 'Con-'
I'm confused. Is this about American English or British. You mention American, but then refer to Cambridge Dictionaries on line which sounds very British to me. From the pronunciation of 'commercial' which is non-rhotic I'd guess British. So which is it? The answer may not depend on rhotacism but the two varieties may differ on the first syllable.
Aug
27
comment What is the definition of “hangry”?
I'd question the "commonly accepted" caveat, it seems like I've never heard it outside of this post. It's a portmanteau word like "chortled," or "flustrated" which are usually restricted to Dr. Seuss and Lewis Carrol.
Aug
27
comment Expression for an abrupt change in height
Your question is not very specific and also somewhat self contradictory. Is it the change in height you're looking for or the edge? Also, did you attempt to look for a translation of 'Geländekante'? What is the definition (in English) of that word? That might help us better here since this isn't German-English-translation.SE.
Aug
25
comment Is the word 'dumb' offensive?
@Anonym that makes sense, but it is not in the OP at all. Rishi can you clarify what you mean by offensive? Is it because 'dumb' might be confused for a disability?
Aug
25
comment Is the word 'dumb' offensive?
That's not offensive at all. If you were to say '... may be dumb, but it's your guilty pleasure.' That would be offensive. 'I may be an ass for watching netflix' is slightly offensive. Likewise 'boring' might be taken as offense for someone else. 'Tall' would not be offensive in either.
Aug
25
comment Is using “and/or” recommended for formal writing, or is it frowned upon?
@Simone In computers/logic, 'or' is inclusive: 'if X is true or Y is true, do Z', it is certainly allowable for both X and Y to be true in order to execute Z. But people usually speak about real world events, 'Can I get you coffee or tea?', means you'll get a single cup of one or the other (or nothing if you don't want it) but people normally don't get two cups or mix them up. So in normal English speech, 'or' is almost always exclusive. One sometimes hears a question 'Can you do X or Y?' and the correct answer is 'both' but it is unexpected.
Aug
24
comment “Was” or “were” in subjunctive clauses
@JanusBahsJacquet which pair? Both you would say because they both show 'were' more common. Anyway, I don't hear it in speech anymore.
Aug
24
comment “Was” or “were” in subjunctive clauses
@JanusBahsJacquet Link? is that "If I was you" vs "If I were you"? or just "If I was" vs "If I were"
Aug
24
comment “Was” or “were” in subjunctive clauses
@JanusBahsJacquet ...'“if I were you” is a correct example (which it is)', correct in your idiolect (mine too!) but not in all; most people don't use it these days.
Aug
24
comment Can “some” be more than 50%?
@JanusBahsJacquet all these measure terms are vague but with their different nuances: one, a couple, few, a few, some, several, many, most, all (that's how I order them). Of course with any particular set they may overlap, and some of one set may be more than most of another set. But for one set, 'some' if forced at gunpoint, is usually not more than 50%. In that instance one would use 'most'. Of course, in logic/math, 'some' means anything more than 'at least one' up to 'all' which is more than 50%.