26,657 reputation
842113
bio website http://-
location United States
age 42
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 5 hours ago

native speaker of American English (AmE)


5h
answered TH sound, is it continuant or stop?
13h
comment What word can I use instead of “tomorrow” that is not connected with the idea of the rising sun?
Just to make sure, you're trying to be historically accurate about Saxon vampires? Then this is gen ref.
15h
answered Is “notations” a proper English word?
2d
comment He nearly drowned
@JanusBahsJacquet: I disagree. If I heard "I nearly/almost drowned" means you were in the water."I nearly/almost died today" means you were in a car wreck but survived, not that you could have been in the car wreck.
2d
comment He nearly drowned
Those all apply to the first setting (getting water in your lungs) but not the second. It's only in a humorous manner in which you might say that. It's like saying the guy who was captain of PT 108 almost became president (because JFK was captain of PT 109).
Jul
20
comment What's the word for a tiny sharp piece of wood under your skin?
You can also call the metal thing a 'metal splinter'.
Jul
18
comment Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
For once, I would suggest, against my better judgement, that you consult Urban Dictionary to see if this really matches.
Jul
18
reviewed No Action Needed To Be Used Of/For
Jul
18
reviewed No Action Needed Use of brackets in legal writing
Jul
18
reviewed No Action Needed Too serious to take seriously
Jul
18
reviewed No Action Needed Is “life is hard without jam” in use?
Jul
18
reviewed Close Meaning of “get off the hammock”
Jul
18
reviewed Close How should one punctuate “upper right most”?
Jul
18
reviewed Close Grammatical Voice Problem
Jul
18
reviewed Leave Open A word for high level officials in the government
Jul
18
reviewed Leave Open Phrasal verb/adjective
Jul
17
comment Replacing “yes” with “absolutely”: multiple “w” ' s
@FumbleFingers Piss. Taken. You obviously didn't look up everything.
Jul
16
comment Replacing “yes” with “absolutely”: multiple “w” ' s
THe word 'absolutely' only really started being used when Rita Hayworth, April 1 1946, used it once in the movie Gilda, and everybody has been using it since. Look it up.
Jul
16
reviewed Leave Open 'as of' in ‘Excusal as of right’
Jul
16
reviewed Leave Open Other words for the cadaverous blue?