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9h
comment What does Antichronic mean?
If it's not a 'word' yet, then how could it mean anything? Since this sounds like a neologism, this is primarily a discussion topic on opinion.
9h
comment The ultimate 'Heart' and 'Brain' question
Given @choster's comment, maybe a better place to ask this is on philosophy.stackexchange.com
11h
comment Word for a non-subscript symbol
superscriptand?
11h
comment Can you start a sentence with “Hopefully,…”?
possible duplicate of What's the correct usage of "hopefully"?
11h
comment Can you start a sentence with “Hopefully,…”?
Which is a long way to say, on SATs you probably don't want to use 'hopefully' as a sentence adverb, but most everywhere else is OK with that. Hopefully.
11h
comment Can you start a sentence with “Hopefully,…”?
Sentence adverbs are perfectly legal "Lately, I've come to appreciate the follies of youth". But 'hopefully' is problematic. Some people say that it should only be used to modify a verb directly or that you should just say 'I hope...' instead. Others say it is OK. Grammar Girl has the best advice to help you on SATs but not necessarily real life. I guess the editor at the New Yorker might have a tiz fit if you used it as a sentence adverb; they also avoid splitting very splittable infinitives.
14h
comment What is a list of words that can be used to describe tone and not mood and vice versa?
What are the definitions you're using? Can you put those in your question?
15h
comment What is the opposite of superficial?
What did a thesuarus suggest, and what was not good about those?
15h
comment Synonym request for Alpha Female
@TusharRaj "isn't standard". Nothing else here is going to be standard either. It's going to be opinion based because there is no exact equivalent currently (well the claim is that 'alpha female' is), and any answer will then just be speculative. Just because UD says it doesn't mean it's wrong.
15h
comment Synonym request for Alpha Female
Joe, the text of your answer is full of opinion and personal judgement. Can you edit to remove all the irrelevancies and leave just the answer?
15h
comment Synonym request for Alpha Female
@TusharRaj I think this is saying that 'alpha female' does work, despite your feeling that it doesn't.
15h
comment Synonym request for Alpha Female
@JoeBlow Words can have more than one meaning. Some of those might be scientific and stipulated. Others might be circumscribed by context (e.g. 'circumscribe) 'Alpha male' has a scientific meaning for animal behaviorists as you note. It has a metaphorical, cliched meaning for others, 'the big man on campus' or 'the dude who always has to be in charge'. The OP seems to be asking about the metaphorical usage.
16h
comment What is the difference between “poverty” and “poorness”?
'Poorness' is a word? What does a dictionary say about the two? Which is to say, 'poorness' is rare.
16h
comment What should EFL students learn? U.K. or U.S. English?
The simplest answer is it depends. If you just want to read the newspapers and listen to news, the difference is negligeable. If you expect to talk to Americans then AmE, UK people BrE. Based on population, and not knowing where you or your students come from, that would mean AmE.
16h
comment What's the difference between notorious and infamous?
'Notorious' is also negative. It may appear in more ironic contexts than infamous, but it is still negative.
17h
comment Synonym request for Alpha Female
'Alpha female' is perfectly fine, if you really must use such cliches.
1d
comment Is “a whole nother” grammatical?
This answer is supported by the OED's entries on 'nother' and 'another'.
1d
comment Is “a whole nother” grammatical?
This analysis, though compelling, is not supported by the OED's entries on 'nother' and 'another'. 'nother' is attested in this usage back to Middle English (1300's).
1d
comment Is “a whole nother” grammatical?
'A whole nother' is exactly the way to say it in very informal or regional varieties of English (at least AmE). In standard more formal American English you would say 'a whole other', but that phrase is so reminiscent of 'a whole nother' that you'd probably want to say something entirely different, like 'an entirely different thing'. Re: grammatical: both ways are 'grammatical' in their different contexts (informal vs formal). If I know what you're getting at with 'grammatical', no, you should not use 'a whole nother' in written or spoken English unless you want to sound very colloquial.
1d
comment when using the titles of Dr. should it be followed by their first name or last name
From this answer the OP will expect to use Dr. Firstname as a default. That is quite the outlier in my experience.