26,740 reputation
842113
bio website http://-
location United States
age 42
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 8 hours ago

native speaker of American English (AmE)


1d
revised “More loudly” vs “louder”. Correct usage
removed tendentious language
2d
comment Aberrant usage of the adjective “incredulous”
Pam - If that is truly your interpretation, I find it very difficult to make sense of. So yes, I think it is wrong.
2d
comment Aberrant usage of the adjective “incredulous”
@Pam I don'r understand your alternate interpretation. Are you thinking that the sentence could mean that it is incredulous that she asked at all?
2d
answered Aberrant usage of the adjective “incredulous”
Jul
26
comment From a non-native's standpoint: Which dictionary should I pay attention to when I find semantically contradictory definitions of a word?
Dictionaries do not define well. They miss so much: all the aspects of the word, all the contexts it could appear in, all the nuances, all the connotations, the social appropriateness.
Jul
26
comment Sentence in which “its” and “it's” can be interchanged without changing the meaning?
Without changing the meaning? That seems a sstretch. How about just both grammatical?
Jul
25
comment TH sound, is it continuant or stop?
Aprendice, sorry if I'm not being clear. I do understand that the 'th' is difficult to pronounce correctly if you didn't grow up with it and there will be a great tendency to pronounce it as you do. What I'm trying to tell you as that to remove you confusion, things are as I said, 'th' is never a stop. That is not confusing at all. It is still very difficult for you, I get that. It's just very simple,'th' is always a fricative. Difficult to do but very easy to understand. If you find yourself wanting to do 'th' as a stop (plosive) then that is wrong. Always a fricative. Never a stop. Easy.
Jul
25
comment TH sound, is it continuant or stop?
Aprendice, no matter what your teachers say and no matter what you hear and do, colored by your years of experience with your native language, it's never a stop in standard English, fast or slow, in between vowels, beginning or end of words, or next to other consonants.
Jul
25
comment What are the most common ways to say “die”, i.e. pass away?
"Personally, I've never heard or read this before." - but the how did it pop into your head to ask about here? What other option is there?
Jul
24
answered TH sound, is it continuant or stop?
Jul
23
comment What word can I use instead of “tomorrow” that is not connected with the idea of the rising sun?
Just to make sure, you're trying to be historically accurate about Saxon vampires? Then this is gen ref.
Jul
23
answered Is “notations” a proper English word?
Jul
21
comment He nearly drowned
@JanusBahsJacquet: I disagree. If I heard "I nearly/almost drowned" means you were in the water."I nearly/almost died today" means you were in a car wreck but survived, not that you could have been in the car wreck.
Jul
21
comment He nearly drowned
Those all apply to the first setting (getting water in your lungs) but not the second. It's only in a humorous manner in which you might say that. It's like saying the guy who was captain of PT 108 almost became president (because JFK was captain of PT 109).
Jul
20
comment What's the word for a tiny sharp piece of wood under your skin?
You can also call the metal thing a 'metal splinter'.
Jul
18
comment Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
For once, I would suggest, against my better judgement, that you consult Urban Dictionary to see if this really matches.
Jul
18
reviewed No Action Needed To Be Used Of/For
Jul
18
reviewed No Action Needed Use of brackets in legal writing
Jul
18
reviewed No Action Needed Too serious to take seriously
Jul
18
reviewed No Action Needed Is “life is hard without jam” in use?