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answered Fire meet gasoline: is it correct?
8h
comment Is the word “palaver” in common use anywhere in the English-speaking world?
Since this is the one 'data' oriented answer, would you happen to have done a vocab frequency search for palaver in COCA?
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reviewed Leave Closed Etymology of 'remit' {noun}?
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reviewed Leave Closed What does “Shall be” mean?
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reviewed Reopen Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back?
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comment Is “incorrect facts” an oxymoron?
Or I see everywhere the pleonasm 'true facts'.
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comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
If you're saying that 'fact' has slipped in usage to mean something metaphorical like 'factoid' (in analogy with 'literal' slipping in meaning to mean something like 'really a lot', then I've come to accept that that is possible, but I don't see that it is happening. I see it is more that people believe they're using it about facts, but are actually not (the Great Wall example). I realize that this is not terribly different from the situation with 'literally' but I don't have enough examples of the faulty usage that you see. Can you give more?
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comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@reinierpost I am agreeing with you that Tom's usage isn't wrong (he is using the word 'fact' correctly for his beliefs), but that he is objectively wrong (the statement " 'The Great Wall can be seen from space' is a fact" does not accord with ... the real world (other people's beliefs supported by objective data). I'd also say Tom is not using the word wrong, even if he is lying or bullshitting; he's trying to get across the idea that a statement is true (whether he believes it or it is or anything).
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revised Is the word “palaver” in common use anywhere in the English-speaking world?
deemphasized Dutch sidebars
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comment Is “It's not a second, seven seconds away” a kind of idiom in English?
(Almost) anything goes in poetry and lyrics, in order to fit meter or rhyme scheme or whatever. Also, these words are not reminiscent of any kind of idiom.
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comment What doe Ev. followed by a number mean in a footnote?
Can you give an example? (type it out)
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comment Is the word “palaver” in common use anywhere in the English-speaking world?
This is a fascinating comment. But it is about Dutch right? So it's not really about English. Please move to a comment.
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comment Words to describe a person who is arrogant
Also, what did a thesaurus tell you and why weren't any of those suggestions what you're looking for?
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revised What would you call a word that doesn't exist in or translate well into another language?
meaningless change
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comment A neutral word to describe ones ability to bypass social expectations in interpersonal interactions?
This is still unclear. Your title and text are at odds. The first leans towards cold/impersonal/autistic spectrum/sociopathic but the second is more about integrity/morality/principled. I think so far there are lots of suggestions but no indication if any are hotter or colder. Also, do you care about noun vs adjective, because if 'integrity' is a perfect noun, there's no exact adjective counterpart (though 'scrupulous', 'ethical' can still fit). So which ones so far are closer? (also check a thesaurus for more suggestions)
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comment A word for “lack of a word”?
@EdwinAshworth but that question is about having the word in your language, but the target foreign language does not. For example, English has a lexical gap for Schadenfreude in German, but there's no word in German for describing the fact that the German word Schadenfreude cannot be translated to English. That is, for the concept matched by the German word Schadenfreude, English-centric there's a 'lexical gap', but German-centric there's no word for English not having the word (in English). Or maybe you can just forget '-centric' and say that English has a 'lexical gap' there.
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comment A neutral word to describe ones ability to bypass social expectations in interpersonal interactions?
All the suggestions are in the right area, but 'professional' fits just right in your examples: professional = not letting personal feelings to sway decisions on what is best for the company. It is very neutral (or maybe even positive).
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comment Is there an English equivalent to the Chinese saying, 君子之交淡如水 …?
@PapaPoule Watson is a computer using published writings for its sources. Instead of actually trying to translate word for word, the computer probably found some older human translation. Because of the radically different semantic ranges of comparable words in English and Chinese, there is often in such translations selections of words that are tone-deaf.
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comment Felicitated- pragmatics and connotations
It sounds like a malapropism for 'facilitated'. But when read literally it sounds like a back formation from 'felicitations' (congratulations) and so sounds very inappropriate for a memorial service. But in context of a military memorial, congratulations may be considered appropriate for the ultimate military sacrifice. (and maybe that's how it is used in IndE. I don't think it is used at all (or 'congratulate' for that matter) in US or UK military memorials.
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comment Is there an English equivalent to the Chinese saying, 君子之交淡如水 …?
'insipid'? I don't think that means what the translators want it to mean.