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7h
reviewed Close How did “but” mean “only”?
7h
reviewed Close What do we call a non-technical person?
7h
reviewed Close “Should be done by” or “should have been done by”?
7h
reviewed Close What is the difference between “tried closing my eyes” and “tried to close my eyes”?
7h
reviewed Close What is the practice of using elaborate introductions to one's idea called?
7h
reviewed Close Comma usage (ex. His sister, Anne, was not feeling well.)
7h
reviewed Close preposition confusion in or on
7h
reviewed Close Is the word “by” necessary when modifying a percentage figure
7h
reviewed Close Infinitive or gerund
8h
awarded  Famous Question
14h
comment Looking for a word like “eulogy”, but for a person that has not died?
Easily confused with meconium
14h
comment What is a good word I can use for the talking I do with myself in my mind?
Dialog is more common than dialogue, but monologue is still more popular than monolog
14h
comment What is a good word I can use for the talking I do with myself in my mind?
Try the more accurate -ue- endings for monologue: books.google.com/ngrams/…; Dialog is more common than dialogue, but monologue is still more popular than monolog
14h
comment What is a good word I can use for the talking I do with myself in my mind?
A 'stream of consciousness' is probably what the OP is doing, but the literary/psychological term is usually associated with inarticulate rambling. The OP probably wants something that makes it seem more like a coherent narrative (the narration/monologue of the movie of his own life).
15h
comment GRE Sentence Completion -2
Manish: good point, and that's exactly the kind of nuances it is good to make explicit when answering these kinds of questions. But the closer opposite of 'no surprise' is 'unexpected' rather than just 'negative' ('confusing' has too many other meanings beyond negative which are not related to the positive of 'no surprise'). So 'no surprise' is perfect but 'confusing' isn't. If 'unexpected' weren't a choice, 'confusing' might be the best of the remaining, but that still doesn't make it good; it just seems irrelevant (like the others).
17h
comment What is the opposite of argumentative?
What did your thesaurus say? I like 'conciliatory'.
18h
revised Is there any relation between “genius” and “ingenious”?
word usage
19h
comment Is there a synonym for “thesaurus”?
There's a definition of thesaurus in a dictionary, and there's a synonym of dictionary in a thesaurus. I think that's as far as the etiquette needs to go. Don't you think it's a bit vain of dictionaries to define themselves?
19h
comment GRE Sentence Completion -2
'on the other hand' should introduce a direct contrast. 'unexpected' is the best counterpart to 'surprise'. 'confusing' is not right because it is somewhat on the same side as 'surprising' in this context.
20h
comment Is there different word corresponding to “teatime” in American English?
Wilber82: 'teatime' does not mean 'sex' in the US. There might be some extremely narrow slang where there might be some relation, but don't take Urban Dictionary seriously. That is one possible (and very dubious) meaning out of many. As @Catija mentions, if the word is spoken rather than written, it's most likely to be understood as the time when you're going to start a game of golf.