Reputation
35,622
Next tag badge:
393/400 score
100/80 answers
Badges
13 65 149
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~4.4m people reached

2h
revised Specific name for double PhD
expanded 'no' for clarity.
2d
answered Does the “she was found in violation of…” <-> “she was violated” equivalence have a name?
2d
revised Does the “she was found in violation of…” <-> “she was violated” equivalence have a name?
tags
Apr
27
reviewed Leave Closed Is “I was who sent you the letter” grammatically correct?
Apr
27
comment Opposite of Hoarder
LIke the Buddha, an 'ascetic'. You'll get other suggestions from a thesaurus (which provides antonyms)
Apr
26
comment “Abstract nonsense” — does it have negative meaning?
'nonsense' rather is not positive. In the mathematical contexts where you'd see this phrase (in discussions of category theory), you're more likely to expect this phrase to be disparaging. But it may also be used in a backwards way, almost sarcastically, as a compliment.
Apr
26
comment Difference between 'prank' and 'hoax'
A prank is a small trick usually played on an individual intended to be discovered and laughed at. A hoax is a lie on many people intended not to be discovered. A particular UFO story would be a hoax if the story was made up in order to deceive.
Apr
26
comment Slang meaning of “sheltered workshop”
@HotLicks Even though I've never heard it before, it seems, from Google NGrams, that it was a popular term in the US and UK in the 70's and 80's. BrE, AmE
Apr
26
comment Slang meaning of “sheltered workshop”
@HotLicks the disparaging usage makes sense to an AmE speaker with explanation, but without that explanation it is not disparaging ('sheltered workspace' is not a set phrase in AmE; it sounds like a place where you work that has a lot of oversight). I don't know what is the or if there is a corresponding term in AmE.
Apr
25
comment English for “ayudante de cátedra”
TA or teaching assistant is common for this in the US
Apr
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
25
comment Why is a young man called “son,” but a young woman is never called “daughter”?
The usage of 'son' is not necessarily acceptable in all situations. It may be considered too patronizing, especially in mixed race situations. 'boy' is even worse.
Apr
23
comment How to pronounce GUID
@Pacerier I give a sad little choking sound
Apr
22
comment Man who confused word order
Ajit: add this content to your first answer, and then delete this
Apr
22
comment Abbreviation for “Master?”
@Mazura How is it not an answer? The OP asks for an abbreviation, and this answer says there isn't one. That's a perfectly acceptable answer.
Apr
22
comment Politer word to refer to a 'cleaner'
Yes, this seems to match more closely than any other what the OP requested. 'cleaner' by itself (or with modifiers) is not impolite or disparaged at all. And the people who come late at night to clean offices after hours are currently called 'office cleaners'. 'Janitor' has become a bit disparaging and 'custodian' is used more often nowadays instead. An office cleaner often implies female, and janitor/custodian male.
Apr
22
comment 'café' pronunciation
Pavel: I've edited to include content fro OD. Please check to make sure I've preserved your intent. Have you really heard this second pronunciation previous to now on the BBC?
Apr
22
revised 'café' pronunciation
added content from OD site
Apr
22
comment Jamaican version of English explanation
As interesting as this is, we don't really do translation requests, or broad explanations of texts.
Apr
21
comment What to say instead of “Ladies and Gentlemen”?
@Elian 'Gentlemen, Madam' though very formal, does sound idiomatic for addressing people directly.