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10h
comment Why “thanks” Can Never Be Singular as a Noun?
I don't think you want 1 half of a pair of pants.
14h
answered Is “I like dogs but cats” a valid sentence?
15h
comment Want to know the components in a sentence, clause, and phrase
'Apples are red in color': syntax and semantics interact, the choice of word affects syntax. So both rules work, but depend on the words used.
16h
revised Informal way of saying “on the contrary”?
changed punctuation
1d
comment Is there a word that means “having to do with genre” or “with respect to genre”?
'Genric'? Sounds wrong before and after hearing what it is intended for. And it will be jarring even if you define it explicitly.
1d
comment Is there a word that means “having to do with genre” or “with respect to genre”?
Are you looking for 'specific to a genre' (without having to say which genre it is) or do you want a word/term for all genres in the abstract (as opposed to non-genre writing)?
1d
comment A verb for “letting one be in some mental state”
You have some very specific conditions. Why must it be a single word? Why must it use a preposition? Isn't your situation more like a person takes a particular medication and what follows is a change in mental... something (reduces anxiety, causes tinnitus, removes pain)? How about this as a generic example: "The drug Amphilaxinib induces euphoria". Does that fit your desired pattern?
1d
comment How to pronounce the polish name “Aronszajn”
Ask the moderator of your section. Or pick one and be confident with it and then ask in discussion afterwards. It'll be good food for discussion that will make the talk memorable.
1d
answered Informal way of saying “on the contrary”?
1d
comment Informal way of saying “on the contrary”?
I agree with @speedyGonzales, 'bullshit' means something very different than 'on the contrary'. 'Bullshit means that you think they are intentionally saying things you know are not the case. 'on the contrary' just registers a difference of opinion.
1d
comment Is there a word for ordinal numbers which enumerate non-overlapping periods of time?
I don't think I understand. Do you have exactly one sequence of in-out times? <0,1>, <5,19>,<20,23>,... where the pairs are never overlapping? Do you want to label the time spans with an ordinal or what?
1d
comment Referring to someone's country of ancestry in an informal way?
'fatherland' and 'motherland' are interesting. They are (obviously) English words, and used in English for the country/place where a person comes from but never for English speaking people. Which implies that they are only used to translate similar terms from non-English languages. In English culture, an English speaking person from, say, Devonshire or Iowa or Queensland never refer to that place as 'fatherland' or 'motherland', but probably simply 'where I grew up' or if noun is preferred, 'my birthplace'.
2d
comment How do you denote written slang?
Both '[sic]' and scare quotes meet the intended purpose of showing that you are intentionally doing something special (different meanings though: '[sic]' is usually interpreted to mean that you consider it a mistake, scare quotes if you meant it sarcastically). However, artistically, I find either inappropriate, too knowing. If you're going to be low register, just be it, don't point out how you're being clever.
2d
comment Is Grammar An Exact Science?
Linguistics is the least exact of the true sciences, or the most exact of the social sciences (well, maybe economics or psychology are more). Grammar, a different thing and one small part of language study, is very much rule based and strict, but there is a lot about it that gets confused with style which is purely a humantiarian concern.
2d
comment Is Grammar An Exact Science?
Nice analogy with meteorology.
2d
comment Meaning of no more likely
'A is no more likely than B' -> 'A is not > B' -> 'A <= B'. Your '1' is correct. '2' is include as part of your '1'
Apr
14
comment What does “make off campus” mean in following sentence?
'off campus' is a location (in distinction to 'on campus'). The idea probably also didn't make it in New York.
Apr
14
comment Colloquial term for “irritable bladder”
You're right, using 'irritable bladder' (not particularly colloquial) with 'dude' is an incongruous mix of styles, so would most likely not be used (except by maybe physicians speaking informally). But for someone who has to 'go' a lot (not necessarily irritable), 'small bladder' is often used (this is not terribly technical, but is not really colloquial either). I can't think of a term in the register you're thinking of.
Apr
13
comment What do you call the wooden bridge-like structures that make up a harbor?
@Mari-LouA I don't know if google is taking AmE and BrE differences into account. Or maybe it is and you're seeing the BrE version.
Apr
13
comment What do you call the wooden bridge-like structures that make up a harbor?
@FrancisDavey 'groyne' is unfamiliar to me. I suspect 'breakwater' is the same in both. This whole Q/A has taught me that jetty is different. In AmE, a jetty is not for em- or dis-barcation at all (so I think no overlap there) at least in my own idiolect. The connection (that infer) is they're both manmade things sticking out in the water.