29,492 reputation
1149126
bio website http://--
location United States
age 43
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 4 hours ago

native speaker of American English (AmE)


22h
comment Single word or phrase - conspiratorially exchanging glances
a "knowing" glance.
23h
comment A new use for the word Alibi
Does your meeting leader have any military background?
1d
comment Meaning of “Back on their heels”
@Sabuncu I'm sorry to hear that you will leave. Andrew and J.R. are despite your feelings, considered both very fair, well-reasoned, and helpful. The other mods too. If it'll help, stay awhile and just read to get a feel for the place (and meta too). And compare with other sites. Then judge.
1d
comment “None of who’s” vs. “none of whose”
@JohnLawler - I can hear the apostrophes...in the screams of my grade school English teacher.
1d
comment Meaning of “Back on their heels”
@Sabuncu: I think you took the advice of the mod the wrong way. He was just giving advice on how to make your question better and fit with local culture. Sometimes honest constructive criticism is taken as rudeness. I know this may sound too blunt, but you're not special. Meaning that no one is out to get you in particular. No knows you and so all we can go on is the content. And so that was what was being commented on, not you personally. No personal attack was intended. But it's the effect on you that matters not the intent. The mods are surely learning from this interaction.
2d
comment Meaning of “Back on their heels”
This is an excellent question. What is the provenance and more accurate meaning of the phrase?
2d
comment Does the word zealous have an implicit religious connotation?
yes, 'zealous' has a religious connotation but not very strong. It all depends on context. If you're talking about politics of drought in northwestern South Sudan and someone is zealous about damn building, then its not religious. If you're talking about Methodists in 17th c England, then it's religious. If you're talking about 1st c Palestine under Roman control, then it's almost literal.
2d
comment the Virginia public school district
Try removing Virginia. Do you need 'the' then? (yes, you do).
2d
comment “As for me” in the beginning of the sentence
Yes, you can do that, it's perfectly good idiomatic English. If you're writing a newspaper or journal article, style guides recommend avoiding the first person.
2d
comment Is there a list of syllables contained in US English?
Excellent question. For some languages this is straightforward, for example Mandarin has a very regular syllable structure (a small set of consonants to start with, a small set of vowels, and a very small set to end with (or nothing), and they (mostly) change independently. English (and most Indo-European languages) aren't so simple. I have seen a regular expression for English syllables...it is a mess.
Jan
25
comment Pronunciation of Fete as in Village Fete
How do you pronounce 'athlete', 'concrete', 'complete', 'delete', etc etc? From examples, one would expect '...ete' to rhyme with '...eet'. But anything goes when borrowing from another language, and so there is free variation in English with 'fete' sounding like 'let' or 'late', and never with 'elite'.
Jan
24
comment Single word for a person who hates their birthday
Evol, I wonder why you'd need a single word so badly because a few words are just as good or better, and I don't see why a single word would be useful at all if you're just curious if one exists. Therefore, I infer that you must need it badly. Like the Joker is threatening your family unless you come up with one.
Jan
23
comment Etymology for “loganamnosis”
That someone created a word, implying a psychiatric illness, for when someone asks more than once what a person's name is, that sounds like its own morbid preoccupation with other people's minimal personality quirks.
Jan
23
comment Does it sound right in English?
It sounds better with 'crossroads'. A 'crossroad' is a road that crosses another. A 'crossroads' (what you meant) is the intersection where two roads cross each other.
Jan
22
comment Subject or Object Pronoun
Yes, 'I' is formally correct. In informal contexts it's OK to use 'me'.
Jan
21
comment For medicine we need a prescription; for having medical tests, what do we need?
Medica, are you saying that a single test is always a prescription, and that more than one must be an order?
Jan
21
comment Martini, Extra Dirty
PbxMan, just because someone says it in a movie doesn't mean that anyone in the real world would have a clue as to what was meant. The explanation works...as an explanation of what the writer probably meant. But I can't imagine any bartender understanding that sentence in any context.
Jan
21
comment Computer Science: When we say spawn a process, why use spawn?
Atupal, this is as good as it gets for an explanation. Some random person thought it would sound catchy and it does.
Jan
21
comment He dies when he is
Normally, totally out of context, and in most real contexts, it should be "...died...was...". But in the context of the story there may be very particular circumstances where dies/was works.
Jan
21
comment Is there a word meaning “awardtion”?
Is the award guaranteed or are you just extremely confident that in competing for the award you are the best and will most likely win?