184 reputation
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visits member for 1 year, 4 months
seen Nov 12 at 12:29

Dec
16
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
2
accepted Ambiguity in usage of the word “Distend”
Oct
2
comment Ambiguity in usage of the word “Distend”
Hmmm, Interesting but still the OALD could have used a little more sensible example for such word. Thanks anyway
Oct
2
comment Ambiguity in usage of the word “Distend”
@curiousdannii Couldn't it be that the OALD confused the meaning...
Oct
2
comment Ambiguity in usage of the word “Distend”
What on earth is the reason of the downvote?
Oct
2
asked Ambiguity in usage of the word “Distend”
Jul
20
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
9
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
13
accepted What does this sentence mean ? “Heaven and earth, are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted?”
Dec
13
comment What does this sentence mean ? “Heaven and earth, are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted?”
@Kris, It looks like some users of this site harbor a strong ambition for closing questions... All I'm asking is the meaning of the phrase in plain English. Does this post really seems to you,I don't know, faint?
Dec
12
comment What does this sentence mean ? “Heaven and earth, are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted?”
What does "heaven and earth" mean? Why did the Lady used "thus pollured" if the marriage had not taken place yet?
Dec
12
asked What does this sentence mean ? “Heaven and earth, are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted?”
Sep
16
accepted Is there a connection between *miser* and *misery*?
Sep
15
asked Is there a connection between *miser* and *misery*?
Sep
12
comment What do you call an event that happens without a cause?
@Izkata xkcd.com/1240
Sep
10
awarded  Teacher
Sep
10
answered The single word for “Volume per second”
Sep
10
awarded  Commentator
Sep
10
comment Difference between “acute”, “chronic” and “obtuse” in the sense of illness
@TrevorD What could it be? Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary. Did you even read the post?
Sep
9
accepted Difference between “acute”, “chronic” and “obtuse” in the sense of illness