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visits member for 3 years, 2 months
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I am a language and IT specialist. My current activities include:

  • development of various web sites, including the compilation and back-end development of language dictionaries and learning materials (incorporate Java Servlets and MySQL);
  • software development, including various titles published for iOS;
  • language translation, with a focus on specialist IT translation between French, Spanish and English;
  • web articles devoted to Java programming with a focus on performance.

Please message me privately for information about potential collaboration.


Apr
13
answered Is the English-speaking Internet community moving towards Americanized spelling?
Apr
13
answered “I hope this computer work”?
Apr
13
comment “I hope this computer work”?
@ArlaudPierre But I think John's stance is that there's essentially no reason to even dream of it being a subjunctive in the first place, so that issue then disappears.
Apr
11
comment Does “In the event of …” take the genitive case?
@tchrist Yes: if you call 's a "genitive" in English, then we really need a different term to refer to the genitive in languages that actually have an overt Case system...!
Apr
11
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Apr
11
answered 'Have had,' auxiliary & main verb
Apr
8
answered Usage of Me or I
Apr
7
answered Why are there a lot of different types of the same verb?
Apr
6
comment What's the reason, words like “Thou” and “Thee” are no longer used in English language
True, but among languages such as these that make a T/V distinction, there is considerable variation. (Indeed, there can be within the same "language", e.g. in some varieties of Spanish, "usted" is actually comparatively rare, whereas other varieties have at least a 3-way formality distinction...) One way of seeing things is that the distinction disappearing completely is simply "one end of the spectrum".
Apr
5
comment What's the reason, words like “Thou” and “Thee” are no longer used in English language
It's actually not that astonishing. Languages are complex systems that evolve in a Darwinian way, with changes being the result of multiple competing factors. If anything, it would be astonishing if you COULD attribute the change to one specific factor.
Apr
2
revised comma before “if you will”?
Corrected typo "pronunciation" > "punctuation"
Apr
2
revised comma before “if you will”?
added 263 characters in body
Apr
2
answered comma before “if you will”?
Apr
2
comment Grammar knowledge - cause for low knowledge
@rogermue In principle, I think you could re-phrase your question to ask about actual facts/research, but as it stands I agree with those who have voted to close as what is being asked is simply a matter of opinion.
Apr
2
comment Proper way to cite Wikipedia according to the Chicago Manual of Style?
Presumably somebody has mandated that you adhere to the Chicago Manual of Style in the first place. So why not simply ask them which style they prefer where? (And if nobody has mandated that you use it, then which form do you prefer?)
Apr
1
comment Use of the subjunctive mood, “be”
I wonder if it's an example of an overenthusiastic editor (assuming O'Reilly have such a thing)?
Mar
3
comment Is “like” used as an adjective by native speakers?
@StoneyB So I think the answer to that would be: "it depends on what's useful and consistent for your analysis". As a point of reference and to cut a very long story short, if in "Don't throw [good money] after [bad -]" you say for the purpose of your analysis that 'bad' is "still an adjective" (with some syntactic wrapping around it), then maybe that would make you lean towards saying that 'like' is "still an adjective" in "compare like with like". But... it's arbitrary. What I don't think we can do is simply jump to an unqualified statement that it's "definitely a noun".
Mar
3
comment Is “like” used as an adjective by native speakers?
@StoneyB What makes you jump to that analysis? (It's one possible analysis, but another is that they are adjectives. And actually, neither is necessary satisfactory. But I think it's still reasonable to class it within the list of cases that "might" be analysed as adjectives.)
Mar
2
answered Is “like” used as an adjective by native speakers?
Mar
1
comment Why hasn't the pronunciation of w been shortened?
@PeterShor I wonder if 'w' is "shortened" per se, or if what is happening is essentially a phonetic/phonological process that you also get language-wide in e.g. "[double y]our time" etc.