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I am a language and IT specialist. My current activities include:

  • development of various web sites, including the compilation and back-end development of language dictionaries and learning materials (incorporate Java Servlets and MySQL);
  • software development, including various titles published for iOS;
  • language translation, with a focus on specialist IT translation between French, Spanish and English;
  • web articles devoted to Java programming with a focus on performance.

Please message me privately for information about potential collaboration.


Jan
16
comment Correct use of Though
@davecw It seems to me you're just talking about a typographical preference (and one essentially irrelevant to the spoken language, of course).
Jan
16
comment Correct use of Though
I think the OP means when you use "though" effectively to mean "that said". For example: "My favourite colour is blue. Though, I like red too."
Jan
11
answered Three inches of snow is/are expected?
Jan
4
comment Use of subjunctive in Britain vs North America
@tchrist In the UK it would be a normal usage, including, say, in the formal written usage of national "quality" newspaper journalists. I should say, though, that actual corpus data suggests that it is also common in US usage. (That's not to say that in the UK you don't also find "...that he leave" -- that would also be perfectly normal, acceptable usage in a formal context-- it's just that either is perfectly possible.)
Jan
4
answered Use of subjunctive in Britain vs North America
Jan
4
comment “I think she is not right” - is this sentence correct?
Thanks -- didn't realise that this had been dealt with before. Incidentally, there are differences between the Romance languages in how automatic it is for the subjunctive to be triggered under particular circumstances wrt these verbs, and the two phenomena (negative raising vs subjunctive selection) may well be separate phenomena. Isn't verb raising essentially a separate phenomenon too?
Jan
4
answered “I think she is not right” - is this sentence correct?
Dec
16
comment Subject–verb agreement — two schools of thought?
Honestly, if think you need a corpus study every single damn time you want to decide whether to use a singular or plural verb, then I would suggest a vocation other than as a writer because life is going become pretty impractical sooner or later...! Seriously, it is possible to take a general survey of usage and opinion and then, as a writer, Take A Stance.
Dec
5
comment “Runtime”, “run time”, and “run-time”
@reinierpost My point wasn't that the spelling "runtime" applies only when used inside another compound, but more that the the OP's worry about the spelling needing to change if it was an 'adjective' was essentially a red herring. To answer your other question, I can't personally think of a case where I'd write "designtime", though not for any ideological reason but simply because I don't think I've seen it used and so it could look strange/hard to decode for readers.
Oct
31
comment Is the use of “would” valid when describing a hypothetical, future situation?
Re your "generic linguistic definition of subjunctive that covers all imaginary...": the general definition of "subjunctive" is ideally not so wishy-washy. The linguistic definition that linguists strive for is one that hones it down to something much more precise, e.g. "the grammaticalisation of non-assertion through a verbal paradigm". The idea is also to hone it down for all languages: it defeats the point if you precisely define a phenomenon but then say "ah, but in English, we'll use the word to mean something more wishy-washy instead".
Oct
31
answered Is the use of “would” valid when describing a hypothetical, future situation?
Oct
30
awarded  grammaticality
Oct
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
15
revised What does “canonical” mean?
deleted 1 character in body
Sep
12
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
12
comment Are these double negatives? “No it is not. No I don't think so.”
Probably apocryphal-- every time somebody tells a version of this story, the actual words they quote (be it "Yeah, sure" or whatever) seem to be different. And in any case, this wouldn't be a "double negative" in the syntactic sense so it's a slightly pointless anecdote whether true or not...!
Sep
11
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
5
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
5
awarded  Nice Answer