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I am a language and IT specialist. My current activities include:

  • development of various web sites, including the compilation and back-end development of language dictionaries and learning materials (incorporate Java Servlets and MySQL);
  • software development, including various titles published for iOS;
  • language translation, with a focus on specialist IT translation between French, Spanish and English;
  • web articles devoted to Java programming with a focus on performance.

Please message me privately for information about potential collaboration.


Jul
14
answered Proper Names Functioning as Adjectives
Jul
14
answered Adding “-ing” to a verb ending with a pronounced “e”
Jul
13
reviewed No Action Needed similar to & the same as
Jul
12
answered “I'm going to help you like I promised.” Good English? Informal? Only colloquially acceptable? Wrong?
Jul
12
awarded  verbs
Jul
4
comment Infinitive of purpose or “for verb-ing”
...It doesn't matter terribly much what you call it, but the point is that "cleaning" in this case ostensibly on the "noun-like" end of scale, whereas it would need to be more towards the "verb-like" end to be conjoined with "repairing" rather than "repair".
Jul
4
comment Infinitive of purpose or “for verb-ing”
@tushain You're taking an informal definition of "gerund" which is sometimes adopted, but doesn't help us here. It is possible for an "ing" form to take on a combination of verbal and nominal features but where the verbal features essentially win out in various respects. That is what I and many linguistics would strictly refer to by "gerund" and is essentially the usage that would lead one to expect "repairing" rather than "repair" here...
Jul
4
comment Infinitive of purpose or “for verb-ing”
@tushain The word "cleaning" isn't a gerund in this case-- a gerund would be modified by an adverb, whereas "cleaning" would be modified by an adjective in this case: "closed for scrupulous cleaning"/"*closed for scrupulously cleaning".
Jul
4
answered Infinitive of purpose or “for verb-ing”
Jul
3
comment Is “nothing but birds and a few insects” singular or plural?
@keshlam Not even sure what it would mean for a choice that is never used to be "technically" correct...?!?
Jul
1
comment Redundant definite article?
I suspect that this is a "picture-of" construction, which precludes the possessive construction as such, but a conditioning factor is nonetheless that it is not a generality but rather attributable to a specific individual. (Obviously this is a broad off-top-of-head a posteriori observation-- I haven't come up with anything close to a strict theory or distinguishing criteria...!)
Jul
1
comment Redundant definite article?
I guess that part of the issue is that your native language arbitrarily conditions you to what is the "default" expected use of articles. To a French speaker, it can seem that English is "missing" the articles in many cases expressing generality, whereas to an English native, it can seem that French unnecessarily includes the article. To a native French speaker, it is completely logical to say "prendre l'apéritif" (def. article), whereas to an English speaker, the logical thing to have is "an" aperitif...
Jul
1
comment Redundant definite article?
As well as simply arbitrary idiomatic habit as you say, isn't part of the difference that in "I can't stand the sight of him", the presence of the article suggests that it is specifically "the sight belonging to him" that you can't stand?
Jul
1
answered Redundant definite article?
Jun
24
comment Is this Adverbial a complement or an adjunct?
Agree with John -- I think these "classifications" muddy the waters by confounding what are essentially different dimensions of categorisation. I think it's more useful to concentrate on classifying constituents according to (a) their essential category (e.g. if something is phrase headed by a preposition, call it Prepositional Phrase); (b) as a parallel dimension, their structural position within the sentence as a whole (e.g. whether they are an argument/complement of the verb, or an adjunct to the verb phrase, an adjunct to the sentence as a whole, etc.).
Jun
24
comment Conundrum: “cleverer” or “more clever”, “simpler” or “more simple” etc
@AndrewC So let's say that chain of events is true for the sake of argument... but the thing is-- and this is my essential point-- that it's an unreliable indicator when it comes to coming up with rules for the present-day situation. Take your rule and then compare the situation of, say, "hotel" (where the "h" is now pronounced in English) or "herb" (where it is or isn't in different dialects of English). Over time, analogy and other processes of language change are likely to become more dominant factors than historical origin.
Jun
24
comment Conundrum: “cleverer” or “more clever”, “simpler” or “more simple” etc
@AndrewC - The reason that speakers don't pronounce the "h" in "heir" is because... speakers don't pronounce the "h" in "heir". If you're proposing some model of language acquisition that relies on granddad setting you down on his knee and recounting some story about the Normas on order for you to detect and internalise a phoneme pattern... I think there's seriously little evidence for it!
Jun
21
revised Pronunciation of foreign words by foreign speakers
added 496 characters in body
Jun
21
answered Pronunciation of foreign words by foreign speakers
Jun
17
comment There is vs There are
Basically, you've committed a logical fallacy. You've made an a priori assumption that the language works in a particular way or conforms to a particular invented logic. But in reality, the language doesn't conform to that logic.