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visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Dec 21 at 0:16

I am a language and IT specialist. My current activities include:

  • development of various web sites, including the compilation and back-end development of language dictionaries and learning materials (incorporate Java Servlets and MySQL);
  • software development, including various titles published for iOS;
  • language translation, with a focus on specialist IT translation between French, Spanish and English;
  • web articles devoted to Java programming with a focus on performance.

Please message me privately for information about potential collaboration.


Dec
16
comment Subject–verb agreement — two schools of thought?
Honestly, if think you need a corpus study every single damn time you want to decide whether to use a singular or plural verb, then I would suggest a vocation other than as a writer because life is going become pretty impractical sooner or later...! Seriously, it is possible to take a general survey of usage and opinion and then, as a writer, Take A Stance.
Dec
5
comment “Runtime”, “run time”, and “run-time”
@reinierpost My point wasn't that the spelling "runtime" applies only when used inside another compound, but more that the the OP's worry about the spelling needing to change if it was an 'adjective' was essentially a red herring. To answer your other question, I can't personally think of a case where I'd write "designtime", though not for any ideological reason but simply because I don't think I've seen it used and so it could look strange/hard to decode for readers.
Oct
31
comment Is the use of “would” valid when describing a hypothetical, future situation?
Re your "generic linguistic definition of subjunctive that covers all imaginary...": the general definition of "subjunctive" is ideally not so wishy-washy. The linguistic definition that linguists strive for is one that hones it down to something much more precise, e.g. "the grammaticalisation of non-assertion through a verbal paradigm". The idea is also to hone it down for all languages: it defeats the point if you precisely define a phenomenon but then say "ah, but in English, we'll use the word to mean something more wishy-washy instead".
Oct
31
answered Is the use of “would” valid when describing a hypothetical, future situation?
Oct
30
awarded  grammaticality
Oct
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
15
revised What does “canonical” mean?
deleted 1 character in body
Sep
12
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
12
comment Are these double negatives? “No it is not. No I don't think so.”
Probably apocryphal-- every time somebody tells a version of this story, the actual words they quote (be it "Yeah, sure" or whatever) seem to be different. And in any case, this wouldn't be a "double negative" in the syntactic sense so it's a slightly pointless anecdote whether true or not...!
Sep
11
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
5
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
3
comment Is the word “formulæ” valid English?
@tchrist What you say is essentially true from the RAE's perspective. I'd just remind readers that the RAE isn't in possession of a magic button that it can press to instantly change the collation standard adopted by every single Spanish speaker and sort implementation on the planet. The reality is that you will find a variety of opinions on whether ch and ll are considered separate letters and where they are placed in the alphabet (if only because there are a variety of routines installed on the world's computers-- I dare say few people actually care).
Sep
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
5
comment When to use “myself” or “me”
It's maybe worth mentioning that "myself" is sometimes used for contrast or emphasis. So you may find e.g. "Please register myself but not Jim" being used by some speakers.
Aug
5
comment adjective-born or noun-born?
Both constructions exist. I have to say that "France-born" sounds a bit odd to my ears for some reason, but e.g. "England-born" or "English-born" sound fine (as do "Texan-born" and "Texas-born").
Aug
1
answered Should I use “or” or “nor” in the following case?