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Mar
19
comment “Who” vs. “whom” in tricky sentence
@RodneyAtkins - Inasmuch as that is true, a rule to artificially add "m" to "who" in presentday English is still arbitrary: it is not part of the language as "naturally" acquired by native speakers; the circumstances under which "whom" is prescribed are essentially arbitrary; no other word in the language is given this special treatment; and no other vestiges of historic forms of "who" are prescribed.
Mar
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
12
awarded  Yearling
Jan
10
comment Nouns and determiners
It sort of does, doesn't it? -- the questioner asks if you can get countable nouns without a determiner, and the thrust of the answer is "yes you can, and these are broadly the circumstances when you do". Relevant extensions/improvements are welcome, though...
Dec
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
15
revised “like I” or “like me”?
added 3 characters in body
Sep
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
10
awarded  Famous Question
Jun
13
revised “Who wrote … ?” or “Who did write … ?”
edited body
Apr
9
answered Present simple Passive - Change in the meaning when translate from active to passive or Vice versa
Mar
17
revised “like I” or “like me”?
Corrected typos
Mar
15
comment “If I would go there, I would be in trouble” - correct?
@Constantin - I think the case you mention is effectively analogous to cases such as "The car won't start", "Will you marry me?" where "will" and associated modal forms are used with a meaning close to 'want to', rather than a purely "functional" use.
Feb
18
comment What is the grammatical subject in these phrases: “what is there to eat?” and “who is at the door”
Saying that "there" is an adverb is also essentially an exercise in "wanting to identify the word as one of the traditional categories but having nowhere else to stick it".
Feb
18
comment What is the grammatical subject in these phrases: “what is there to eat?” and “who is at the door”
Re "linguists have chosen to call there the subject...": I think you may be confounding concepts. In modern theories, there isn't necessarily a single entity called a "subject". A verb can have an argument from which it draws certainly inflectional features such as singular/plural, which traditionally make that argument the "subject". And syntactically, there are structural postions that coincide with what we traditionally conceive of as the "subject". But it doesn't necessarily even make sense (or isn't terribly useful) to identify one single entity as "the subject" of a sentence/verb.
Feb
12
awarded  Yearling
Jan
28
comment Comma usage - am I working with coordinate adjectives or cumulative adjectives?
Incidentally, you can't coordinate "streaming" and "simple" with 'and'. While they're both sort of "adjectives", they're adjectives of different types to the extent that coordination doesn't work. (It's a bit like if you try to say "He left in a hurry and a car" -- "hurry" and "car" are both nouns, but that isn't a sufficient condition for being able to coordinate them with "and".)
Jan
28
comment Comma usage - am I working with coordinate adjectives or cumulative adjectives?
It's not so much "correctness", but more that they mean different things. "Simple streaming music" means "simple music that is streaming", whereas "Simple music streaming" means something like "a simple method for streaming music". The latter is a more usual thing to talk about, at least in, say, the field of IT...!
Jan
27
comment Comma usage - am I working with coordinate adjectives or cumulative adjectives?
Do you mean "simple music streaming"?