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Jan
11
comment Allegedly/Presumably/Supposedly - what's the difference?
Would you say that the example "She said the club was still open at the time, allegedly for a private party." from oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/allegedly is one of these unfortunate uses?
Dec
21
comment What's the origin of the word 'noise' in photography?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(signal_processing)
Nov
30
comment In which countries would “tags” be understood to mean “License plates and stickers that show the registration is currently valid”?
@AndrewLeach, the German word for such a sticker is “Plakette”.
Nov
10
comment If you can be “discombobulated”, is it possible to be “combobulated”?
On the other hand, recombobulate has been used a bit more recently, probably humorously.
Oct
4
comment When to use “nude” and when “naked”
And German has only nackt (although we have Nudisten, i.e. adherents of Freikörperkultur).
Sep
24
comment Why do we use the article 'a' when referring to 100 items? But we don't use it when referring to any other plural count?
english.stackexchange.com/questions/10521/…
Sep
24
comment Why do we use the article 'a' when referring to 100 items? But we don't use it when referring to any other plural count?
a dozen, a score(?)
Sep
10
comment Is “act like a mensch” too localized for ELU readers (U.S. and/or British English)?
Thanks, @aparente001, you are quite right. I do of course recognise the word from my native language, and I am aware that German seeming words that I encounter in American(?) English may be Yiddish. I remember an American colleague using to shlep (if that is how you spell it). Now I could not have said whether I have actually heard mensch on the Gabfest (thanks for looking it up) but since the show is partly from New York and two of the three regular hosts are Jewish, that was not unlikely. I guess I just wanted to remark that more factors are at play here than being English or American.
Sep
7
answered Is “act like a mensch” too localized for ELU readers (U.S. and/or British English)?
Sep
2
comment How do I translate “Zwangsrouter”?
Your first link seems to be to a machine translated text, the second is to a text apparently from Germany with no clear authorship.
Aug
6
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
25
comment What is the US English for “soppy”?
Excess can be desired: Need really soppy romcoms to watch!!
Jan
14
comment Is it correct to start a sentence with “Ad question one…”?
This is indeed a German habit, I was not aware that it should not be used in English. duden.de/rechtschreibung/ad
Mar
29
comment Wer, wie, was, wieso, weshalb, warum, all start with W in German. In English they don't, why?
Just looking at wieso, weshalb, warum, it seems more plausible that German has lost an original word for why and had to construct substitutes.
Jan
26
comment What does “spam in a can” mean?
One more source: books.google.de/books?id=OZ_jQVH3oMwC&q=spam%20in%20a%20can
Jan
15
comment Is there a word for false false friends?
I am confused. As far as I can tell “falls flat” and “fällt flach” do not mean the same thing, but “write sth. off” and “etw. abschreiben” may.
Jan
14
comment Origin of the name “Rijndael”?
And for me the Google preview of the first result had “It is based on the Rijndael cipher developed by two Belgian cryptographers, Joan Daemen and Vincent Rijmen [...]”. From there, one might be able to guess ;)
Jan
14
comment Is it proper to say “I earned -1 points today” when I lost 1 point?
The only grammatical issue here is whether -1 demands singular or plural.
Dec
31
comment What is a person who smells things called?
I assume you meant olfactory sense instead of olfactory smell, which would be doppelt gemoppelt (just throwing in another germanic language for no particular reason).
Dec
5
comment Should a mathematical variable at the beginning of a sentence be capitalized?
My answer as a mathematician: The variable names should never be capitalised, x and X can very well be different variables. And variables at the beginning of a sentence should usually be avoided in writing. I wanted to add that something else that should be avoided are consecutive formulas without words or at least punctuation between them, but then I could not come up with an example, it seems to be more of a problem in German than in English.