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Probability, finance and due diligence - @EllieAsksWhy


Mar
21
revised the USA vs the US
added 5 characters in body
Mar
21
comment the USA vs the US
@DougM Yes, but I didn't convey it too well! I just edited my answer, and tried to make it clear. Thank you so much for noticing!
Mar
21
revised the USA vs the US
More clarity per DougM's good comment!
Mar
21
answered the USA vs the US
Mar
21
reviewed Reviewed “Do You Dreams Come True”: A clever pun or just bad English?
Mar
21
revised “Do You Dreams Come True”: A clever pun or just bad English?
Added missing spaces; fixed typo's etc.
Mar
21
reviewed Reviewed How do we differentiate long vowels from short vowels in English
Mar
21
comment How do we differentiate long vowels from short vowels in English
Could you clarify, i.e. more directly explain how this answers the question?
Mar
21
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Term to describe quality of one's day
Mar
12
revised Word for a person who loses or has lost faith?
Added comment by OP http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/156501/word-for-a-person-who-loses-or-has-lost-faith/156505?noredirect=1#comment326379_156501
Mar
12
comment Word for a person who loses or has lost faith?
Crestfallen is used to describe a fleeting emotion. It might be no more than a few second's duration. To lose faith in a person, process or belief system (whether in the context of religion or not) is different. It might not be permanent, but losing faith is not used to describe casual matters.
Mar
10
revised Word for a person who loses or has lost faith?
slight grammar, more consistent formatting; corrected spelling of disillusioned to match cited defn; still has too much punctuation...? Maybe not...fussy OCD me ;o)
Feb
12
awarded  Yearling
Feb
9
comment Provoke in a good way
They are somewhat masculine examples e.g. Pittsburgh Steelers, sports team coaches, tech start-up's (which shouldn't be gender-specific, but generally are), but I'm not complaining. I am a woman, and wouldn't find spur to be a word of positive encouragement. Most prose is not gender-specific though, so spur is probably just fine in a general sense. It is much better than "stimulate", "lure" or "arouse"!
Feb
8
comment Is this correct English or is it slang from a particular region?
@JanusBahsJacquet There's nothing regional about it. I don't think dialect is the correct tag here.
Feb
8
comment Is this correct English or is it slang from a particular region?
@Susan You're right! It IS awful. I always pause, to figure out what they are asking, then hesitate to disclose the information to anyone who asks for it like that, as it makes me feel suspicious.
Feb
8
comment Provoke in a good way
The question asked for positive words of encouragement. Spur is hardly positive in most contexts. Spurs look cool, but no one wants to be goaded in the ribs with spurs.
Feb
8
comment Provoke in a good way
The question asked for positive words of encouragement. Spur is hardly positive in most contexts. Spurs look cool, but no one wants a goad in the ribs with spurs.
Feb
8
comment Provoke in a good way
Who are you? It makes me feel happy to read this. It is ethical and fair and honest and true and just so good in every way.
Feb
7
comment What are “pushing horns”?
@T.E.D. What looked to your "non-FFA eyes"... does FFA mean "Future Farmers of America"? I took horticulture classes in high school (it was mandatory for vocational ed requirements), and placed in entomology contests at the college, but never qualified for one of the blue, wide-waled corderoy FFA jackets with my county in yellow on the back. I still want one, even now.