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2d
comment Meaning of “False Positive”
Also the effect of a false positive depends on the severity and risks of the treatment.
2d
revised What should I call a person from New Zealand?
"New Englander" thanks to ab2
2d
comment What should I call a person from New Zealand?
@ab2 of course it is. Edit on its way.
Feb
8
comment What did Terry Pratchett mean by “avec”?
I got a similar impression that avec had a specific (if unspecified) flavour. English prejudice might suggest garlic but I'm sure that wasn't stated.
Feb
8
comment What should I call a person from New Zealand?
@WayneEra I think that's common to many nicknames for people from a particular country when there's no engative connotation.
Feb
8
comment What does “Take care sweets” mean?
@jamesqf but note that the use of terms of endearment between non-partners is highly variable (see my answer at english.stackexchange.com/a/293430/48571 and the discussion following it)
Feb
8
answered What should I call a person from New Zealand?
Feb
5
comment What's the difference between “rent” and “hire” in British and American English?
(I know this is old) from the use of "pernickety" they're British - Americans would use "persnickety". Presumably there are exceptions.
Feb
5
comment Quotes vs. colon convention
@SwankyLegg "brake" as a synonym for "halt" would just about make sense but would be an odd choice.
Feb
5
comment Pronouncing vote as voyt?
This isn't how it's pronounced in any British English I'm familiar with. The premise of your question is wrong.
Feb
4
comment Should one hyphenate 'shoulder width' in this context?
@HotLicks that's not commonly used, "wide apart" would be used instead. It's a description rather than a unit of measure.
Feb
4
comment Should one hyphenate 'shoulder width' in this context?
@Hotlicks that would be unusual in UK usage, especially as the implication is "your own shoulder width".
Feb
1
comment A word for a military unit still functioning?
I thought it was something like that -- I (too-) often comment a caveat on word-choice answers that I think are good but not the best fit.
Feb
1
comment A word for a military unit still functioning?
It may be be techniczlly correct for me to say this, but "fighting fit" implies a unit near peak performance, while merely "operational" can include this and a unit that's suffered but not so much as to be out of of comission.
Feb
1
awarded  Civic Duty
Jan
31
comment What's another word for “grind thoroughly” or “grind smoothly”?
Other options include lap for solid surfaces. But if you're talking about grinding to a powder, that wouldn't work.
Jan
31
comment Word for attending lectures without seeking a degree
"Auditor" is (as good as) unknown in this sense in the UK.
Jan
30
comment hungry is to starving as thirsty is to?
But not uncommon in the UK, where context is important in distinguishing real thirst and thirst for alcohol.
Jan
29
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
I was thinking that, but the financial element appears to be missing in dictionaries online (despite how I've heard it used). Anyway, +1 and welcome
Jan
27
answered Would it be more correct to say “active winter holidays” or “winter activity holidays”?