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2d
revised Is it correct to use elipses in a formal essay?
mathematical use, counterexample etc.
2d
comment Is it correct to use elipses in a formal essay?
@Deadrat, on an "is ... correct in formal writing" question, pedantry is probably more to be welcomed than forgiven. The mathematical use is probably the most common for me, yet it didn't even occur to me to mention it here. I considered making a clarity-based argument to offset the "sparingly", which I meant as advice but I may have given the impression that it was a rule. Further edit to follow now I'm on desktop
2d
revised Is it correct to use elipses in a formal essay?
Halting speech, specific example.
2d
revised Is it correct to use elipses in a formal essay?
Halting speech
2d
comment Is it correct to use elipses in a formal essay?
@deadrat reported speech is another case in the "direct quote" category, but a good point I shouldn't have ruled out. Barring typos, I meant to say that a list with missing items is fine so long as it doesn't change the meaning of the quote.
2d
comment Does 'no useful info' unequivocally mean 'some info is present?
So I am a physicist with some understanding of quantum information. I avoid physicsforums and to a lesser extent physics.se as places where my time disappears. Without getting as far as your "notes" your option c summarises my answer - except, but reading just a little further in the new version, the possibility of useless information being transmitted doesn't really exist because of the type of experiment.
2d
comment Does 'no useful info' unequivocally mean 'some info is present?
This answer applies to the original version of the question. I'm leaving it intact for now although it may not be directly applicable to the current version.
2d
answered Is it correct to use elipses in a formal essay?
2d
answered Does 'no useful info' unequivocally mean 'some info is present?
Apr
27
comment Why is it “ladies and gentlemen” instead of “gentlemen and ladies”?
It's not universally "boys and girls" (ngram has 4:1 "b&G":"g&b" in 2000, peak of 16:1 in the 30s). The pattern is rather different for "ladies and gentlemen": diverging rather than converging.
Apr
25
comment Am I RICEing my injury?
@ruakh perhap it was over-compressed into a comment. A familiar pre-existing word may encourage adoption (of a spelling or pronuciation), but there's an opposing pressure to avoid ambiguity. (The "S" was careless, btw)
Apr
25
comment Am I RICEing my injury?
@ruakh, I suggest this is less common for acronyms that would be homonyms or common words (such as RICE, Navy SEALS). In fact there are plenty of initlialisms and similar abbreviations that could be pronounced as a common word but are spelt out (ID, to use an example already here).
Apr
22
comment A swallow does not make a summer … or a spring?
@Josh61 without "swallow" (which makes it too long) "does not make a spring" is useless. E.g. "does not make a spring day warm/pleasant/wet", "does not make a spring stiffer/more flexible", "does not make a spring run dry". Each could be individually vanishingly rare but with "spring" having so many meanings and everything else common they all add up. However it's perfectly possible that I've just been in the wrong place at the wrong time to hear (or remember) the "swallow...spring" version.
Apr
22
comment A swallow does not make a summer … or a spring?
I've never heard the version with "spring" in Britain.
Apr
22
comment A swallow does not make a summer … or a spring?
The first solitary swallow sighting near the Mediterranean is quite likely to be a premature migrant as (many species of) birds cross at fairly narrow routes when the weather is favourable and so appear together. In Britain, apart from the transit time (and swallows fly quite fast), unless you're near a nesting site your first swallow of the year is likely to be an early breeder catching insects on a warm spring day that feels like but isn't summer. This isn't to disagree with @PeterShor but to suggest a pressure to stick with "summer" as the words drift in meaning.
Apr
21
answered What to say instead of “Ladies and Gentlemen”?
Apr
16
comment What does “Pudding for supper..” mean in this context?
Don't forget that pudding has many different meanings in different traditions.
Apr
16
answered Real parents vs biological parents
Apr
5
answered What is an online “shop” that provides only software available for free?
Apr
1
comment Clear terminology for “single”, “return” and “return-only” journeys
@EdwinAshworth, when you combine popular usage with bureaucratese, strange things happen to the language.