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9h
comment Hypernym for “bark”, “meow”, “roar”
@zencv in that case you want something short and to the point. "Cry" fits perfectly, and the class name gives the context I was imagining, just in code rather than user space.
9h
comment Hypernym for “bark”, “meow”, “roar”
@zencv then you have to consider context. If you have a table with a column headed "animal" the next column could be headed "sound" or "cry" (or similarly some sort of character stats display). In that case a very broad hypernym becomes less broad due to context, If "bark" is the first suggestion of sound/animals rather than the outside of a tree, you need to be more specific.
12h
comment What is the word used to describe the redundancy of using two synonyms to define one thing?
In your particular example "baby" adds a little more than just emphasis. If a lamb is "a young sheep", a "baby lamb" is younger still -- not much more than a newborn (and presumably too cute to taste good -- yet).
12h
comment Usage of 'we' by companies
How else would a company refer to itself in the first person?
May
22
comment Proper name used for memorializing
To be honest I'd consider this a question more of culture (and family circumstances) than one of language as it stands.
May
22
comment What is a good antonym for “redundant” (engineering)?
Critical works quite well here, mission critical really doesn't.
May
20
comment Colloquial English word for: a “Remote control”
Clicker is rare. These days it's more likely to refer to a remote control for giving power point presentations. Zapper used to be common but remote is probably more common now. (Southern England)
May
19
comment Can you sort by random?
@Catija, never say never -- I know /dev/random pushes the limits of randomness obtained from deterministic input, but there are devices based on atomic decay, diode noise, even a lava lamp IIRC.
May
19
comment Can you sort by random?
The process being describe is indeed shuffling, but it's accomplished, as @vsz says, through sorting by a (random hash of keys).
May
13
answered Is there a word for someone who is a regular computer user but not an expert?
May
11
comment I've sent an email asking for a reference from a professor, and got a reply which is a bit confusing
Your professor could easily have been dealing with some emails on their phone while in transit or waiting. If that's the case a reply thanking them will act as a reminder. I would assume to the typo and not mention it - maybe that says more about me than about what you should do.
May
9
comment Carry “on camping”
It's not just "on holiday" but "--vacation", "--safari", "--a journey", etc., even "on a campsite". We might be on a train or bus but not a car. We might "go on a hike" or "go hiking". I'm not sure there's much logic to it. But there are probably several questions (new and old).
May
9
comment Possible double negative sentence explanation
Is this meant to be an almost parodic, long-winded easy of describing the author's long-windedness?
May
9
answered Carry “on camping”
May
9
answered Word for the falling action of a stick with one end is at the ground, not falling freely in the air
May
8
comment Single word that unambigously describes the product of folding
Some nice ideas here, I rather like "structure" though it would be better introduced as "folded structure"/"resulting structure" with subsequent references to "structure". "Structure" has meanings in many fields, so it may not be appropriate.
May
5
answered Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise?
May
5
comment Leftovers that haven't been eaten?
Example 1: you've used "extra", which works. "Spare" could also work especially if they knew someone would want it but not who. Example 2: you've just made your lunch in advance.
Apr
28
comment 'Male'/'female' is to 'gender' as 'left-handed'/'right-handed 'is to…?
@boileau historically and etymologically that may be true, but in terms of current usage it's not -- I'm currently using a Logitech G300 'ambidextrous' mouse. Elsewhere it's described as symmetrical, which is also true. I chose it because I'm -- here's a nice neologism for you -- ambimousetrous.
Apr
28
awarded  Great Answer