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 Yearling
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8h
answered Pence in the pound
1d
comment What are the title capitalization rules for rarely used prepositions like “down”, “up”, “off”, etc.?
I suggest that song titles and writing style guides belong to different fields and aren't easily compared. Your examples use a variety of case styles; the only conclusion I would draw is that articles are (almost) never capitalised. Also note that initial caps may be used for emphasis - this is a Good Thing and may apply in song titles/lyrics. A Down/Up contrast may be worth emphasising.
Jul
26
awarded  Yearling
Jul
17
comment Grammar - Scientific English (Physics)
@Silenus, yes, I was only commenting on their use as names
Jul
17
comment Grammar - Scientific English (Physics)
@Silenus w.r.t "Figure" etc. One of the major style guides disagrees with you. Chicago I think. I have been convinced by the others.
Jul
10
comment A word for a scrawny, ghastly but wise and academic or studious person
@Rok I thought I'd take on the alliteration challenge in the answer using the suggestions in the comments.
Jul
10
reviewed Approve subjective or objective role of “let alone…”
Jul
10
reviewed Reject Is it correct to use 'Forgot password' or 'Forgotten password'
Jul
10
comment A word for a scrawny, ghastly but wise and academic or studious person
Wizened wizard?
Jul
9
comment Headline for a subsection that refers to a summary for the whole section
I think this unnamed summary subsection idea is used, but only when the summary is very short (a single sentence up to a short paragraph), in order to avoid very short sentences. I think I've seen unnumbered (sub-)sections just entitled "summary" at the end of a parent section/chapter in some textbooks, though I can't think of an example off the top of my head.
Jul
9
comment Two plural nouns in a row
@ChrisSubagio I see where you're coming from, but having worked in a systems engineering group, with both "systems engineers" and "systems designers" maybe I've seen it from a different point of view. Convince me that's just HR jargon (which I don't much like) and I'll agree with you!
Jul
9
revised Headline for a subsection that refers to a summary for the whole section
typo
Jul
9
comment Headline for a subsection that refers to a summary for the whole section
"Section" is sometimes used to mean both a level 1 "section" and a level 1.1 "subsection". This won't necessarily lead to confusion as a subsection which is a summary must be summarising something larger than itself. The most likely target is then the parent section.
Jul
9
answered Headline for a subsection that refers to a summary for the whole section
Jul
9
answered Two plural nouns in a row
Jul
6
comment Can shoving someone be nonviolent?
Would you regard "shoving him out of the way of the approaching bus" as violent?
Jun
17
answered A person who isn't skilled in a particular field, a common (wo)man
Jun
16
comment What does the road name 'Meend' mean in English?
Third link now - this page has gone to the top.
Jun
15
comment Is there a name for the abbreviated syntax used in signs?
@TimRomano that depends heavily on the publication (as well as the style of sign)
Jun
14
comment How to use hyphen to form new adjectives?
The presence of vacancies at sites normally occupied by a particular element in a material is a rather specific fact about it. Sticking to a form which mentions the vacancies explicitly is probably a good idea. Two alternatives: rich in oxygen vacancies, a high density of oxygen vacancies.