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Any code of mine that I publish anywhere on stackexchange.com I hereby place in the public domain to the extent governable by law. Explicitly, I place it under the CC0. This also applies to documentation/instructions etc.

Opinions I post are mine and mine only unless clearly stated.

Attribution (especially if I say anything clever) is appreciated where reasonable - but specifically not demanded.


Jul
26
awarded  Yearling
Jun
17
comment What does “Nothing doing as he took it right to him” mean?
It reads to me like speech written down. Without intonation or much punctuation it's not really very clear
Jun
13
comment Usage of the definite article with the abbreviated name of an equipment in a user's manual
@GrahamBorland or a mass noun -- in the sense of zombie food.
Jun
10
awarded  Caucus
Jun
3
answered Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley
Apr
22
comment Using “decadent” to describe a building or town in neglect or ruin
Or in its currently more common form down-at-heel ([(ngrams)[books.google.com/ngrams/…) -- for all corpora except only American English (for which the 2 variants are roughly equal) the version without the is more common.
Apr
14
comment What would you call size that fits between small and medium?
+1 for the steaks reference
Apr
14
comment Term for main part of desktop computer
+1 for base unit
Apr
2
comment An aeroplane, when it leaves the ground, 'takes off'. What does a bird do?
OT but on a motorway I'd disagree with the fitter - pheasants avoid the noise more than some other birds (I've nearly hit them within a few hundred metres of the M5 many times on lanes, never even seen them from that stretch of motorway). The other options is some form of corvid - common around the motorway because of the roadkill and not very scared of cars. A pheasant in flight looks like a ball with a head and tail sticking out - a lot of tail if it's a male, which it normally is because the females hide.
Apr
1
comment Usage of diffuse vs. defuse
In my sort of English they're also not quite homophones - the first syllable is longer in defuse.
Apr
1
comment Usage of diffuse vs. defuse
I think the vast majority of uses of diffuse are intended to be defuse. Applied to an angry crowd for example either could apply - but the crowd would diffuse, defusing the situation.
Mar
26
comment What is an unambiguous single word for a five-pointed star without enclosure?
-> "pentastar" to coin something (you'll probably find a better neologism but I doubt you'll find a single word that's unambiguous without defining it)
Mar
25
comment What's the antonym of “prioritize”?
Your example is really bump... down though - "bump" alone could mean increase or decrease the priority.
Mar
22
comment Word for answering the question you wish had been asked not the one asked?
A comment rather than an answer as (a) it's a phrase not a single word, and (b) it's almost in your question: a Politician's answer (google it with quotes) would be widely understood as what you're meaning. Maybe a "proper/real politician's answer" if it's a particularly fine example from a real politician.
Mar
19
comment Why are knobs called “pots” by some sound designers?
@supercat - I've heard senses - the digital-resistive sense in the wikipedia article I linked (EE usage) and the "it's like a pot but it's clearly digital because it clicks and changes a digital display" like a modern car radio volume knob (user usage, quite possibly a niche misinterpretation).
Mar
18
comment Why are knobs called “pots” by some sound designers?
@SpehroPefhanyI'd heard of trimpot but not helipot -- but I only wanted to add a little footnote to your nice clear answer, and I could easily have written too much for a comment. Btw I've even heard a variac weighing about 20kg but built in to a panel being described as a pot!
Mar
18
comment Why are knobs called “pots” by some sound designers?
@AndrejaKo... and rotary encoders are often referred to in the field as digipots, as they can appear the same to the user.
Mar
18
comment Why are knobs called “pots” by some sound designers?
Just to expand on that a little - that's how a volume control works and the same component is likely to be used in analogue hardware for tone and balance controls - i.e. most of the knobs on an analogue mixer. By extension the term is used for digital hardware, to the extent that the term digipot has come into use.
Mar
14
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@BenMiller, that's a sad story. Though the solution is sufficiently obvious to occur from reading just your link to it.
Mar
14
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
Upvoted because this is actually more relevant in many cases than the gender, and (@T.E.D.) may be a good answer to the spirit if not the letter of the question.