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Jun
17
answered A person who isn't skilled in a particular field, a common (wo)man
Jun
16
comment What does the road name 'Meend' mean in English?
Third link now - this page has gone to the top.
Jun
15
comment Is there a name for the abbreviated syntax used in signs?
@TimRomano that depends heavily on the publication (as well as the style of sign)
Jun
14
comment How to use hyphen to form new adjectives?
The presence of vacancies at sites normally occupied by a particular element in a material is a rather specific fact about it. Sticking to a form which mentions the vacancies explicitly is probably a good idea. Two alternatives: rich in oxygen vacancies, a high density of oxygen vacancies.
Jun
11
comment When “you” is being used as a dummy subject
@MrWonderful: incorrect - no. Overly formal, old fashioned - yes. Especially in speech.
Jun
10
comment Meaning of “rendition” in the phrase “rendition camp”
Rendition has an almost opposite meaning to detention. As @WS2 says, rendition is about moving a person; detention is about keeping them. So a rendition camp is one in which someone is put as part of the process of transferring them from one authority to another. Unlike the more usual judicial extradition, rendition is an executive/paramilitary action.
Jun
10
comment Meaning of “rendition” in the phrase “rendition camp”
As rendition is derived from render, you may want to have a read of the definitions of render. You'll see that many have to do with handing over, so the process of rendition is that of handing over a person to another authority. (Summary/hint -- the answers are good but I think this is worth mentioning upfront)
Jun
4
answered Period after period (abbreviation at the end of a sentence)
Jun
4
comment Does “invertebrate” have a figurative meaning?
Weak-willed would be more appropriate than weak-minded. Your 2nd example seems odd. It only makes sense to me if she saw that her baby was under threat and her will to resist the threatener was destroyed. Even that's a stretch.
Jun
4
comment How common is the term “boondoggle”? And what is its origin?
As @Hotlicks says, dongle is probably a red herring. Also dictionary.com has oversimplified in their primary definition. They give 2 meanings which are both subsets of the IT use which could be roughly defined as "a small hardware device attached to a computer or similar equipment to achieve a specific purpose". Their own example of the (HDMI) chromecast doesn't fit either of their definitions as (2) specifies USB.
Jun
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
3
comment How are you spelling, or how do you spell?
@WS2 I've a feeling there's somewhere in these islands where this is also common, but I can't think where. Presumably though that would be likely to pair with an accent that you would have picked up.
Jun
3
comment Respectful way to refer to people with some disabilities
This isn't actually independent of system design -- do you want one system that works for all, or some set of alternatives with the aim of covering as many disabilities as possible? (Of course these may affect the security or provide new points to attack).
Jun
3
comment Respectful way to refer to people with some disabilities
Cognitive is tricky -- where do you draw the line? Does your user need to be able to read/comprehend speech? Do they need to be able to form words? Sentences? (They may of course not be able to do any of those in a specific case due to a language barrier). The downside of my last suggestion is that some people may struggle but use your system without assistive technology - perhaps they have no control over the system they're using. The "universal access(ibility)" from @David Pugh's comment may be more fitting, but can imply settings that the user must customise - nothing universal about it
Jun
3
comment Who needs a haircut?
@Josh61"Have to"=="Imposed" in my reading, and someone has to do the imposing. There are often other possibilities that have been ruled out or exercised before the haircut is imposed anyway -- refinancing at a lower interest rate/longer term in which the creditor still has a hope of recovering the principle; the creditor taking ownership of (assets of) the debtor, etc. Saying "make real numbers match reality" means you are accepting "reality" as defined by (in the Greek case) the more powerful creditors -- and their "reality" is politically-defined.
Jun
3
comment Who needs a haircut?
@Josh61, I don't think it has much to do with beheading either. But I don't find a metaphor based on a furtive act by someone with no power to weaken someone strong particularly relevant to the case of a government or other strong body openly exercising power to remove property from someone with less power. This is why I think something equivalent to "top-slicing" is more likely. There's something recurrent in this type of metaphor though -- we also have scalping.
Jun
3
answered How are you spelling, or how do you spell?
Jun
3
comment Respectful way to refer to people with some disabilities
I think setting up a situation where you have to have an opposite to "disabled" is problematic. If you're referring to physical disabilities only you can use "physically able" or "able bodied" if you really have to. Sensory disabilities don't lead to an obvious equivalent. There's a bit of a move towards phrases like "people with disabilities" rather than "disabled people": people first, then with a particular attribute, rather than "disabled" as a defining characteristic (in some circles). I'm not an expert on the use of inclusive language though, just picked up a few themes.
Jun
3
comment Who needs a haircut?
I wonder where Safire gets that idea from. Conversely it's easy to see "haircut" as meaning "a little off the top", and to extend that to "a lot off the top", a euphemism for beheading. A "70% haircut" as quoted in the question would refer to cutting off everything above about the knees.
Jun
3
comment Who needs a haircut?
@FumbleFingers (@Josh61) If you search wikipedia for "Roman Art" I suggest that it will show that the Romans styled their hair -- In particular ringlets from Roman Egypt