132 reputation
5
bio website linkedin.com/in/crntaylor
location London, United Kingdom
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Aug 27 at 12:55

I'm broadly interested in very applied math. I try to apply ideas from mathematics, statistics, machine learning, formal systems and computer science to solve real-world problems. Mostly in applied finance/quantitative trading, but in other areas if the mood takes me.


The following is for my own use, but feel free to borrow it -

Hi. It looks like you are new here. We are generally very willing to help, but we like users to show the work that they've done towards solving the problem on their own first. If you can edit your question to show the code you've written so far, and where you are stuck, then you will get a much better response.


Feb
11
comment Where does the Irish idiom “at all at all” come from?
@JonHanna If I understand your answer correctly, it would imply that the two examples I gave in my question aren't correct, because the "at all" is not being used for emphasis - something like "I haven't any money at all, at all" would be more correct. Do I have it right?
Feb
11
awarded  Student
Feb
11
awarded  Scholar
Feb
11
accepted Where does the Irish idiom “at all at all” come from?
Feb
11
comment Why does English spoken by a native Spanish speaker sounds pleasant but not so pleasant when spoken by a native Indian/Arabic/Chinese?
@BarrieEngland Thanks!
Feb
11
comment Why does English spoken by a native Spanish speaker sounds pleasant but not so pleasant when spoken by a native Indian/Arabic/Chinese?
@BarrieEngland That is interesting, do you have a link to those experiments?
Feb
11
comment Why does English spoken by a native Spanish speaker sounds pleasant but not so pleasant when spoken by a native Indian/Arabic/Chinese?
It could still be the case that some or most native speakers find the accent of native speakers of X to be more pleasant than that of Y, in which case it's interesting to ask why the distributional variations exist.
Feb
11
comment Why does English spoken by a native Spanish speaker sounds pleasant but not so pleasant when spoken by a native Indian/Arabic/Chinese?
I think it's a valid question (it seems as though there are differences in how 'pleasant' people find the accents of non-native speakers in English... and I assume in any language) but your personal experience may not be representative of everybody. For example, I find the accented English spoken by many native Arabic speakers to be quite pleasant.
Feb
11
asked Where does the Irish idiom “at all at all” come from?
Jan
24
comment Can or should you use two ellipsis points in one large quote?
@Kris Perhaps I am misunderstanding. I agree with your comment, and your guidelines about how you should quote. But Adam is suggesting that in this case, it might be better not to quote at all, but to paraphrase instead (in which case editing is acceptable, because you are not ascribing words to the original author, but instead describing what they said.)
Jan
24
comment Can or should you use two ellipsis points in one large quote?
@Kris Adam isn't suggesting that this is a quotation. It's paraphrasis.
Dec
30
revised Idiom or word for a very crowded place
Included an image of Piccadilly Circus.
Dec
30
awarded  Editor
Dec
30
revised Idiom or word for a very crowded place
Removed censoring of "assholes"
Dec
30
suggested suggested edit on Idiom or word for a very crowded place
Dec
30
suggested suggested edit on Idiom or word for a very crowded place
Dec
30
comment Idiom or word for a very crowded place
I think that "like Piccadilly Circus" also has connotations of being extremely busy and lively, and not simply being full of people. A funeral could be packed, but it wouldn't be like Piccadilly Circus.
May
11
awarded  Supporter
Feb
9
awarded  Autobiographer