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May
15
awarded  Critic
Apr
7
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
11
comment Where does the Irish idiom “at all at all” come from?
@JonHanna If I understand your answer correctly, it would imply that the two examples I gave in my question aren't correct, because the "at all" is not being used for emphasis - something like "I haven't any money at all, at all" would be more correct. Do I have it right?
Feb
11
awarded  Student
Feb
11
awarded  Scholar
Feb
11
accepted Where does the Irish idiom “at all at all” come from?
Feb
11
comment Why does English spoken by a native Spanish speaker sounds pleasant but not so pleasant when spoken by a native Indian/Arabic/Chinese?
@BarrieEngland Thanks!
Feb
11
comment Why does English spoken by a native Spanish speaker sounds pleasant but not so pleasant when spoken by a native Indian/Arabic/Chinese?
@BarrieEngland That is interesting, do you have a link to those experiments?
Feb
11
comment Why does English spoken by a native Spanish speaker sounds pleasant but not so pleasant when spoken by a native Indian/Arabic/Chinese?
It could still be the case that some or most native speakers find the accent of native speakers of X to be more pleasant than that of Y, in which case it's interesting to ask why the distributional variations exist.
Feb
11
comment Why does English spoken by a native Spanish speaker sounds pleasant but not so pleasant when spoken by a native Indian/Arabic/Chinese?
I think it's a valid question (it seems as though there are differences in how 'pleasant' people find the accents of non-native speakers in English... and I assume in any language) but your personal experience may not be representative of everybody. For example, I find the accented English spoken by many native Arabic speakers to be quite pleasant.
Feb
11
asked Where does the Irish idiom “at all at all” come from?
Jan
24
comment Can or should you use two ellipsis points in one large quote?
@Kris Perhaps I am misunderstanding. I agree with your comment, and your guidelines about how you should quote. But Adam is suggesting that in this case, it might be better not to quote at all, but to paraphrase instead (in which case editing is acceptable, because you are not ascribing words to the original author, but instead describing what they said.)
Jan
24
comment Can or should you use two ellipsis points in one large quote?
@Kris Adam isn't suggesting that this is a quotation. It's paraphrasis.
Dec
30
revised Idiom or word for a very crowded place
Included an image of Piccadilly Circus.
Dec
30
awarded  Editor
Dec
30
revised Idiom or word for a very crowded place
Removed censoring of "assholes"
Dec
30
suggested approved edit on Idiom or word for a very crowded place
Dec
30
suggested approved edit on Idiom or word for a very crowded place
Dec
30
comment Idiom or word for a very crowded place
I think that "like Piccadilly Circus" also has connotations of being extremely busy and lively, and not simply being full of people. A funeral could be packed, but it wouldn't be like Piccadilly Circus.
May
11
awarded  Supporter