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location Wichita, KS
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seen Aug 26 at 14:12

Jun
16
awarded  Caucus
May
28
awarded  Scholar
May
28
accepted What do you call this (these) writing “fallacies”
May
28
answered The clock (has kept/kept) precise time for over forty years?
May
28
awarded  Student
May
28
comment What do you call this (these) writing “fallacies”
@Mitch agreed, but in something as structure and rote-centric as language and grammar I expect something English specific I suppose.
May
28
comment The clock (has kept/kept) precise time for over forty years?
Best I could say then: 1753+40 = 1793 implying that it did keep, or kept accurate time but does not imply that the clock has kept accurate time for 261 years.
May
28
comment The clock (has kept/kept) precise time for over forty years?
Was it stated the clock no longer works?
May
28
comment What do you call this (these) writing “fallacies”
@medica fair enough, I just can't recall ever covering fallacies in any English class at least as fallacies.
May
28
comment “In the mid of 1990s” Is it grammatically correct?
@Neil as an American, I have never heard "in the mid of"
May
28
comment What do you call this (these) writing “fallacies”
@medica this is the right track! Other thoughts: tangentiality - although not as a symptom of a disorder, Fallacy of the undistributed middle, red herring, "train of thought" and derailment, or knights move thinking. Is there an English or grammar term for these not tuned more to logic and philosophy?
May
28
comment What do you call this (these) writing “fallacies”
@Jim Hrm, well yes. That just doesn't seem accurate or narrow enough for what I am hoping a word or phrasing can provide. You are certainly right, but the phrase fails to paint the mental image of what is wrong with the writing style there.
May
28
asked What do you call this (these) writing “fallacies”
Feb
11
comment Way to describe entering old password out of habit?
We jokingly call it "finger memory" at work.
Nov
22
comment Why European, South Asian, Arabian learn English much faster than East Asian (Chinese, Korean, Japanese)?
Is there any actually evidence to support your claim? I spent much of my formative years around foreigners speaking English and I never saw a discernible difference in their English abilities. Differences, yes. Advantages, not so much.
Sep
28
comment Why do certain words have the same type of spelling but different pronunciation?
Also note, cut, but and put are pronounced the same if put is as in golf, but not as in to place...
Sep
16
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Sep
16
comment How do they express the time, in American and British English?
@Jim, it is not common. I spend a fair amount of time with foreigners and the DOT convention seems more natural to me, especially in electronic form, where the . is a habit from code / scripts / files and what not, but : is almost never used... even :: is more common if I ever use : at all.
Sep
16
comment How do they express the time, in American and British English?
As an American I use both past, for quarter past noon, and the DOT in my times. Its 20.43 right now central time... Or a quarter til 21.00
Sep
16
awarded  Commentator