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I have a degree in Linguistics, but I work as a programmer. Most of my expertise about English is self-taught, plus lots of random trivia I've acquired here and there.

This is my favorite EL&U comment ever:

This isn't really a question about English so much as a question about hugs. Source


Jan
29
revised If the letter J is only 400–500 years old, was there a J sound that preceded the design of the letter?
reworded for correctness on the first iteration of J/I
Jan
29
comment If the letter J is only 400–500 years old, was there a J sound that preceded the design of the letter?
@Cerberus, I didn't know that about the origin of J. I'll update the answer. In French, at least, the pronunciation of J was originally [dʒ], later reduced to [ʒ], and English retains the older version. I'm not sure if Spanish ever actually had [dʒ]; the Wiki on en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Spanish_language suggests that it didn't.
Jan
29
revised I have no/I don't have any
edited tags
Jan
29
comment If the letter J is only 400–500 years old, was there a J sound that preceded the design of the letter?
@Cerberus, also, the letter I was pronounced as both [j] and [i] since antiquity, and I believe that even the earliest usage of J was for [j] and not [i]. Are there early examples of the J glyph which clearly indicate [i]?
Jan
29
comment If the letter J is only 400–500 years old, was there a J sound that preceded the design of the letter?
@Cerberus French, as Ledda mentions, and also Spanish. In medieval Spanish j spells [ʒ], which subsequent sound changes have changed to modern [x].
Jan
28
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
28
comment If the letter J is only 400–500 years old, was there a J sound that preceded the design of the letter?
@Bruce is Yeshu something other than a late variant of Yeshua?
Jan
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
28
revised When should an adjective be followed by a comma?
edited tags
Jan
28
revised Where does the period go?
edited tags
Jan
28
revised “Went and got” — is it grammatically correct?
edited tags
Jan
28
comment Because of in the beginning of a sentence
What in particular do you think is wrong?
Jan
28
revised Because of in the beginning of a sentence
edited tags
Jan
28
revised Why does the *dirty* in *dirty mind* refer to sex instead of any type of immoral thought?
edited tags
Jan
28
revised Answering or calling in response to a job posting?
Retitled and fixed tags
Jan
28
revised Using three examples with “range from”
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Jan
28
revised “All X-related things” / “All things X-related” / “All things X related”?
edited tags
Jan
28
revised Is there a non-sexual phrase for sleeping with someone?
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Jan
28
comment If the letter J is only 400–500 years old, was there a J sound that preceded the design of the letter?
@BruceJames To begin with, Jesus' name in his native language was probably Aramaic, not Hebrew (which by Jesus' time was solely a liturgical language, not a spoken language). That said, I don't think there's any real controversy over the fact that Jesus' name was the Aramaic version of ישוע Yeshua.
Jan
28
answered If the letter J is only 400–500 years old, was there a J sound that preceded the design of the letter?