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Jul
26
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
9
awarded  Yearling
Dec
16
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
22
answered He nearly drowned
Jul
22
comment Too serious to take seriously
The elephant in the room, the ostrich with its head in the sand, and the emperor with his new clothes all evoke part of what the question is getting at. For me, the supplement above that cites the proverb, there's none so blind . . ., nails it.
Jul
18
comment Do I so often encounter simple past for past participle (e.g., “I have went,” “what was did to her”) because of where I am or when?
Perhaps because of where you are, but if so it's fairly local. It's not familiar from Moorhead, Brainerd, Ely, or the Greyhound bus that used to ply U.S. 10 between the Cities and Fargo. Is there any of it in early Dylan, before Hibbing's influence had faded?
Jul
9
awarded  Yearling
Jul
9
answered Is “balanced literacy” a generic term, or elementary education specific?
Jul
9
comment Can “no problem” ever replace “OK,” “yes, of course,” etc., when the respondent has been called to task?
Thanks for that context, Thomas. I'll understand it that way whenever possible, and will hope that that's the context in which it's offered.
Jun
18
comment Synonym for “such as”
Consider your audience. Unless you have high confidence that they know that "e.g." can be thought of as "for example" and that "i.e." can be thought of as "in other words," do not use either one. An advanced degree is no assurance that the audience understands this distinction, which seems to cause far more confusion than enlightenment.
Jun
18
comment A way to express an overreaction to something positive
If not for "unable to control your emotions" in the final sentence of the initial question/request, I'd vote for gush. But gush has connotations of superficiality, impermanence, and inauthenticity as well as of excess, while loss of control of one's emotions can reflect deep, genuine feeling. If excess is what Peter555 is getting at, gush is fine. If loss of control is important here, avoid the perjorative and use one of the other expressions below.
Jun
18
comment “Are” vs. “is” for proper nouns which sound plural (such as band names)
If they were the White Socks, being a White Sock would work, as Socks is a straightforward plural noun, just as Yankees is. The Sox spelling seems to be complication here. Curious about whether it works the same way in Boston, home of the Red Sox.
Jun
10
answered Starting a sentence with two subordinating conjunctions
Jun
10
comment Homonyms/homophones and proper nouns
Just be careful. I always thought Don and Dawn were homophones, but it seems they are not in other parts of the U.S. Do they sound alike or different where the rest of you are?
Jun
10
comment A slang word for people who live in “fantasy land”
Since I can't think of a noun denoting a person who is in la-la land (the other term that instantly came to mind), I'm backing space cadet. Plenty of other terms apply, but they either aren't the right kind of noun or are awfully ephemeral. Oddly, the earliest reference to Space Cadet I can recall is as the title of a Robert Heinlein sci-fi novel for young adults, referring in all earnestness to a student in training for a career in space--written long before astronauts and cosmonauts before them made it out of the atmosphere.
Jun
10
comment Where is great in “Great Britain” coming from?
In terms of political geography, the Isle of Wight, etc., are part of the United Kingdom. In terms of toponymy, Great Britain is the big island, not including the wee bits off its shores. Similarly, on this side of the Atlantic, Long Island refers to one island, not also the wee bits such as Fire Island that lie just off its shores.
Jun
10
awarded  Caucus
Jun
10
comment Where is great in “Great Britain” coming from?
It will be fun reconstructing the diagram (like one I've used with my staff) if/when Scotland goes its own way.
Jun
10
comment An Exocentric compound for Children
Hamburg-er, like frankfurt-er, originally denoted a German city of origin, not the content of the food.