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Mar
10
comment “Finnish Swedes” or “Swedish Finns”?
@HotLicks: No. "Swedes living in Finland" does not mean the same thing.
Jan
25
comment Is there a word or term to describe when someone focuses on a specific example, rather than the problem at large?
When someone argues a point, and gives an example that is wrong, it might not be unreasonable to question if that person really knows what he is talking about. When pressed for time, you might even want to stop listening. I don't know if it applies here, but it would be interesting to know if there is a suitable English expression for that view of this scenario.
Dec
23
comment Opposite of “trendy” without a negative meaning
Maybe "established"?
May
10
awarded  Yearling
Jan
8
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
26
comment What does“low wattage” mean in “A politician not being mocked for low wattage”?
As I am reading this, another window is playing a video with tests of computer performance, talking about power consumption in the processor. That metaphor fits very well too!
Sep
22
awarded  Critic
Sep
1
awarded  Yearling
Sep
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
31
awarded  Editor
Aug
31
revised What do we call people who go to the gym?
added 72 characters in body
Aug
31
awarded  Teacher
Aug
31
answered What do we call people who go to the gym?
Aug
31
comment What do we call people who go to the gym?
To me, a "gym rat" is a person who goes to the gym often and has been doing so for a long time. I think what is requested here is a more general term?
Aug
29
comment What word describes someone who offers unsolicited advice?
I wonder if the German word "Besserwisser" is ever used in English? It's been imported into some other languages, such as Swedish, and I think it would fit well here.
Sep
26
comment Is “of” instead of “have” correct?
@drɱ65 δ: Newness to English? Really? I learned English as a second language, and I don't think anyone who has painstakingly learnt "I should have" and "that must have" would make this particular mistake. Instead, I see this as a rather sure sign of a native English speaker.
Mar
7
awarded  Supporter
Feb
25
comment What do you call it when a group of neglected people spontaneously forms a cruel society?
Hm. "Bullyarchy"?
Feb
7
comment What words have “‑ei‑” (except in “‑cei‑”) pronounced [i:]?
Seizure seizure? And I don't think "weird" and "being" fit?
Feb
7
awarded  Autobiographer