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Jul
13
answered Does “value-maker” here imply “artist”?
Jul
6
comment Idiom for someone who buys all the best gear to do something before they even have a basic proficiency?
Unrelated, but sounds like Mr. Dink from Doug.
Jul
6
answered What is it called when a highly respected person commits an immoral act but people don't believe that he committed the act?
Jul
6
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
28
awarded  Yearling
Jun
22
answered Alternative for “manning” a station
Jun
22
comment Word for winning because the competitors were miraculously all worse
Or as Matt Groening would have you call it, "Pulling a Homer".
Jun
17
comment Her complexion was 'beautiful'?
@LittleEva True, but things like 'beauty' and 'exquisite'ness are subjective - which is why I'm against them. If it's clear that it's part of a narrative where the narrative character does feel that way though, then it's totally valid.
Jun
17
comment Her complexion was 'beautiful'?
@TusharRaj Note that I wrote this answer before you wrote that comment. ;) I'm leaving this here, because I think it's still useful, but I won't begrudge you for wanting to use something that's more abstract, especially if it's completely intentional.
Jun
17
comment Her complexion was 'beautiful'?
Incidentally, if you need to modify it for skin tone, "her complexion was fair and smooth" works as well as "her complexion was dark and smooth" or "her complexion was tan and smooth", all depending on the actual tone of her skin. "Green and smooth" might be a little odd, but I won't judge. ;)
Jun
17
answered Her complexion was 'beautiful'?
Jun
17
comment Her complexion was 'beautiful'?
The problem with a phrase like "her complexion was beautiful" or "her complexion was attractive" or even "her complexion was alluring" is that, while colorful purple prose, none of them actually describe any details about the person's complexion - just like how "her complexion was ugly" doesn't describe if she has a scar under her right eye, a blemish on her left cheek, a missing eyebrow with a burn mark over it, or any real details about the person's face. It's a very...empty phrase.
Jun
16
comment Word for going to a university class but without being enrolled?
Keep in mind that for an Audit in the US, you typically still have to pay some part of the course fee to attend. You can't just 'show up'.
Jun
12
accepted Is there a word for being overwhelmed by noise?
Jun
12
accepted Something that is easy to learn, but rewarding to master
Jun
12
comment Word for describing moderate movement speed
@bizzy For what purpose do you need a single-word replacement? Context could help us figure out what word would fit best. Also, why does it need to be a single word?
Jun
11
comment Is there an idiom for being consistently unlucky through no fault of one's own?
@Mari-LouA I disagree - this is asking about an individual who is unlucky, rather than a string of bad luck or a series of unfortunate events.
Jun
4
accepted What is the etymology of the phrase “Lovely weather for ducks”?
Jun
3
comment What is the etymology of the phrase “Lovely weather for ducks”?
@KristinaLopez Admittedly I was a little busy when I wrote this, so it wasn't much. idioms.thefreedictionary.com/Lovely+weather+for+ducks
Jun
2
comment Is there a word for being overwhelmed by noise?
That's...actually pretty good. I usually think of it in the former meaning, and it completely blinded me to the latter meaning. But can it also mean deafened in the sense of being overwhelmed by a single, brief, loud noise?