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User 2188028: Zibbobz.


20h
revised “Here's looking at you, kid” meaning?
Attributing which answers I'm referencing, since there are now more than three
23h
answered Is “layman” an offensive term?
23h
awarded  Nice Answer
2d
comment “Here's looking at you, kid” meaning?
@NateEldredge True, but the OP was asking for the meaning in the context of Casablanca. So while it is good to point out that it isn't always flirtatious, in this case, it is.
2d
answered “Here's looking at you, kid” meaning?
Jan
22
comment Ending a clause with “but”
@FumbleFingers I'd consider that a complete answer to this question.
Jan
22
comment Ending a clause with “but”
@EdwinAshworth Neither of these carry the meaning I want to convey. The first doesn't indicate an exception to the clause being presented, and the second doesn't indicate that this is an additional point following separately but added to any previous point.
Jan
22
asked Ending a clause with “but”
Jan
15
answered Is there an English idiom for trying to do two things at the same time and failing at both of them due to splitting your effort?
Dec
5
answered Why can I use 'guys' in the plural but not in the singular vocatively
Dec
3
comment Smoking, drinking and eating are not allowed
@Domokun Quick, get a cup of soup!
Nov
17
revised What is the opposite of an exhaustive list?
added 481 characters in body
Nov
17
comment What is the opposite of an exhaustive list?
@NoahSpurrier It still implies the list is incomplete, or based on what is known to be necessary so far. Assuming the user's intent is to indicate that the list has not yet been finished. You are right to say that sometimes items may be removed from the list, but it is much more common that the 'tentative' or 'provisional' nature of a list indicates items that are known to be needed, in the case of getting grocery items as an example (though in cases like picking people for a sports team, you are right that items might be removed).
Nov
14
revised What's an item called that was required to progress in a video game, but now isn't?
added 533 characters in body
Nov
14
comment What's an item called that was required to progress in a video game, but now isn't?
It sounds like the real issue here is not whether or not an item can be sold if it is a key item - that seems to differ from game to game (and may rightly be pointed out as a design flaw). The real difference here is that the item appears to be a key item, but it actually isn't relevant to advancing the game.
Nov
13
answered What is the opposite of an exhaustive list?
Nov
13
revised What's an item called that was required to progress in a video game, but now isn't?
added 17 characters in body
Nov
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
12
answered What's an item called that was required to progress in a video game, but now isn't?
Nov
12
answered Should I use comma, or dashes, or braces here?