224 reputation
27
bio website xurble.org
location Burbank, CA
age 40
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Aug 19 '12 at 17:51
Just zis guy, you know?

Dec
9
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
14
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
4
awarded  Popular Question
May
15
comment How did the pronunciation of the word “derby” evolve?
I have never heard a brit say der-bee. FWIW I used to live on the Derbyshire/Yorkshire border. Oh and yes, I never even thought about it, but the same thing does happen with Berkeley: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTeiYN_Vq6E
May
15
awarded  Yearling
May
14
asked How did the pronunciation of the word “derby” evolve?
Jan
2
comment Why does American English pluralize certain singular nouns?
I probably wasn't clear enough. But when I hear "a savings" in the US, it's in the context of a price reduction. Ie the amount you saved compared to the original price. I'm not sure if I've heard it in the context of money saved in the bank or not.
Sep
4
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
8
comment Why does American English pluralize certain singular nouns?
I'd say winnings but never "a winnings".
Feb
6
comment Why does American English pluralize certain singular nouns?
That's interesting. It never occurred to me that it conveyed emphasis. I've actually lived in a few different parts of England (predominantly the north), so I'm relatively sure that this usage is not widespread, if it exists at all.
Feb
6
comment Why does American English pluralize certain singular nouns?
I think my use of "such and such" ( answers.com/topic/such-and-such ) is confusing my question, I've changed it.
Feb
6
awarded  Editor
Feb
6
revised Why does American English pluralize certain singular nouns?
I think I confused people with "such and such" as an expression and had it badly corrected.
Feb
5
awarded  Supporter
Feb
4
awarded  Student
Feb
4
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
4
asked Why does American English pluralize certain singular nouns?