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age 18
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Apr 2 at 15:21

Feb
27
awarded  Commentator
Feb
27
comment Is there a plural for logic?
Why not loadLogicUnits?
Feb
27
comment Is “legit” a legitimate word?
A noun? How so?
Feb
25
awarded  Teacher
Feb
25
awarded  Yearling
Jan
11
accepted What is the correct pronunciation of “AJAX”?
Nov
24
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
4
comment Why is there a “ph” in “cipher”?
So does this fit with the other answer?
Oct
3
accepted Why is there a “ph” in “cipher”?
Oct
3
asked Why is there a “ph” in “cipher”?
Feb
23
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
3
comment First syllable of “gravity”
So, you're saying that English generally doesn't end syllables with /æ/, and that is why the /v/ is placed after it, in the same syllable. I'm usually fine ending syllables with /æ/, or it might be that I change it to /ə/.
Dec
3
accepted First syllable of “gravity”
Nov
8
asked First syllable of “gravity”
Aug
29
answered What is the proper usage of “quite a few”?
Aug
29
comment Changing a quotation so that the original is recognised, but has been given a new meaning
I think the difference here is that no-one was famously quoted saying "got milk?". I'm not really aware of the phrase, could you give some examples of use (I'm not from N America, despite my last tag for this question, "humor" being the one the site chose as the main one; I originally added 3 tags, "quotations", "humour" and "humor", in that order).
Aug
29
answered What is the correct usage of “myriad”?
Aug
29
comment Changing a quotation so that the original is recognised, but has been given a new meaning
I think reference/allusion is the closest answer so far. It doesn't exactly describe the practice, but maybe we just don't have a word for it. If you say "to reference Spock on Star Trek, 'it's counting, Jim, but not as we know it'", people will probably know what you mean. Indeed, you could probably put in any vaguely-related infinitive and people would work out what you mean. I will not mark this as an answer yet, maybe tomorrow.
Aug
29
comment Changing a quotation so that the original is recognised, but has been given a new meaning
As it happens, I thought it was "paraphrasing" at first, then I looked it up and Wikipedia said that it was basically stating what a quotation implies. The quotation being talked about is separated from the paraphrasing by a phrase such as "that is", or "meaning that". Possibly people misuse the word.
Aug
27
asked Changing a quotation so that the original is recognised, but has been given a new meaning