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Sep
14
comment What article do we use before a symbol? Is it “an @” or “a @”?
@JanusBahsJacquet you're correct. I hadn't thought of that one. One thing to note: this only need apply to hanzi, since kana and hangeul characters & jamo have unique phonetic names. With hanzi, I guess one has to take the phonetic value (and dialect) from context.
Sep
9
comment Sieve vs filter? Are they opposites?
For what it's worth, functional programming (the only context in which I use the verb "filter" regularly) has the convention of filter being a function that selects the elements from a list that satisfy the given predicate. sieve is not used. Following this (and common usage, I believe) one filters the whole set of inputs. One filters for or out primes. Having said that, “one filters the naturals out primes” sounds wrong, since “out” isn't a fully-fledged preposition.
Aug
16
comment How and when did American spelling supersede British spelling in the US?
As @TimLymington points out: be careful with “tire” (“fatigue” is one synonym). Otherwise, great answer!
Jul
14
comment What article do we use before a symbol? Is it “an @” or “a @”?
@BogdanAlexandru I'd be surprised if many people in the UK used “pound”, since we already have the ‘£’ symbol. If anything, it'd be the other way round. Note that ‘#’ appears on US keyboards where ‘£’ is on UK keyboards.
Jul
14
comment What article do we use before a symbol? Is it “an @” or “a @”?
It's rare to use articles at all with Hanzi characters. They're words, after all. It'd be “How do you write “字”?”, like “How do you spell “character”?”. The occasion on which they may get an article is if one sees the character written somewhere and wants to say “I saw an\? ‘字’.”.
Jun
17
awarded  Caucus
Jun
14
comment When do I pronounce a non-existing “r” between adjacent vowel sounds?
As for why it's included in those phrases, I'll take your first example: “I saw a movie”. In non-rhotic accents, “saw” is homophonous with “soar” - /sɔː/, with the “dawn” vowel. The ‘r’ isn't pronounced because it's in the syllable coda. But when ‘r’ can become part of an onset, as in “We soar over the fields”, it sometimes is pronounced (“soar over” -> /sɔːɹˈəʊvə/). Hence, non-rhotic speakers sometimes get into the habit of using /ɹ/ as a buffer consonant between a long vowel and another vowel, because the long vowel sounds as if it was followed by a silent ‘r’. Hence /sɔː ə/ -> /sɔːɹə/.
Apr
21
comment Is the use of future tense (especially “will” and “shall”) going out of grammar?
On “shall” vs “will”: the issue is usually covered up by condensing them both down to “'ll”. It's rare to hear “I will”, rather than “I'll” (unless “I will.” is the whole sentence). In writing, I may prefer “name will” to “name'll” because it looks better, and some people might speak like that. For me, it's [əɫ] in any case.
Feb
27
awarded  Commentator
Feb
27
comment Is there a plural for logic?
Why not loadLogicUnits?
Feb
27
comment Is “legit” a legitimate word?
A noun? How so?
Feb
25
awarded  Teacher
Feb
25
awarded  Yearling
Jan
11
accepted What is the correct pronunciation of “AJAX”?
Nov
24
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
4
comment Why is there a “ph” in “cipher”?
So does this fit with the other answer?
Oct
3
accepted Why is there a “ph” in “cipher”?
Oct
3
asked Why is there a “ph” in “cipher”?
Feb
23
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
3
comment First syllable of “gravity”
So, you're saying that English generally doesn't end syllables with /æ/, and that is why the /v/ is placed after it, in the same syllable. I'm usually fine ending syllables with /æ/, or it might be that I change it to /ə/.