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seen Jun 17 at 14:30

Sep
5
comment When did the term “flip flop” displace the term “thong” in North America for a type of sandal?
As an American, I am absolutely baffled by the idea that Australians have no contribution to the English language. Why must Australia's contribution cease in 1780 and yet America can still show its influence in 1970? I don't even have words for such foolery.
Aug
2
answered Help in deciphering the meaning of this convoluted sentence
Aug
1
answered Is “field field” a correct phrase?
Aug
1
answered “I'd-a lost”? What does this contraction stand for?
Aug
1
comment “I'd-a lost”? What does this contraction stand for?
Just want to point out that the lyrics are from a John Lee Hooker song called "House Rent Boogie." Thorogood himself grew up in a decidedly middle-to-upper class non-country setting and is affecting Hooker's style. In the original, it sounds a lot more like "I done lost..."
Aug
1
comment Etymology of “byte”
Andrew's answer below is correct, but it should be mentioned that "bit" is the past-tense of "bite" and also means "a small thing." "Bit" to mean a Binary Digit was used by Shannon for information theory and was well-established by the time (1962) Bucholz wrote/edited the document which wikipedia footnotes.
Aug
1
comment Etymology of “byte”
this is an answer which addresses one possible definition of byte but does not address the question itself.
Jul
2
comment We got you surrounded. What use of GET is this?
More often than not they say "We've got" but the "'ve" is so quick it is sometimes inaudible.
Jun
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
6
answered Is there a word for someone born through incest?
May
30
comment origin of new meaning of whitewash
I take you point, but pandering is certainly a qualitative assessment. At the risk of expanding the discussion beyond what is required, most people find it difficult to accept their own racism and your "middle way" is in fact the way that most people take. It is the classic "if only you understood the reasons why I chose to make this bad decision, you would too" excuse, and it isn't restricted to the topic at hand.
May
23
answered what does “off-the-shelf” mean?
May
16
comment Is the phrase “congenital birth defect” redundant?
I did some very very cursory digging, and there is a little of both. Seems like a grey area, but I am no longer confused about what you meant. It is certainly outside of my expertise as well.
May
16
comment origin of new meaning of whitewash
I can't address the specific questions, but the act of whitewashing is never undertaken by someone who believes that it is not required. Accusations of whitewashing are leveled against people who appear to be making a (negative) qualitative assessment about the color or nationality of a group of people. I think it is obvious that someone who levels such an accusation does not share that negative assessment.
May
16
comment Is the phrase “congenital birth defect” redundant?
I am confused about your assertion that there are birth defects which are not congenital. What am I missing?
May
8
comment The ( changed ) meaning or classification of words in programming
They are called "string literals" and are for the express purposes of presentation for the user. It is arguable that "code" is what they are, and I think you might find that they are considered "data." In any event, I think you should take note that everyone has construed your question as misguided. Perhaps you should edit your question slightly to emphasize that you are referring to strings which are presented to a user.
May
8
comment The ( changed ) meaning or classification of words in programming
code != localization strings
May
8
comment The ( changed ) meaning or classification of words in programming
This is really off topic IMO. Also, you should not be using a spell-checker on source code. Ever. Use an IDE with syntax highlighting or use Notepad++ (etc etc)
Apr
30
comment A water circle of few radius is around the park
I think that moat accurately conveys the "surrounding nature" of the feature, and also allows the OP to say "few feet wide" without needing to reference the size of the park itself. An annulus requires 2 radii to describe, or one absolute radius and a width. The original proposed statement (in the question) suggests a park which is smaller than a hot tub. Note also that while it is debatable whether "radius" is used in common speech, I would bet money that annulus is virtually unknown in common parlance.
Apr
30
comment “I have a question for you” Vs “I have a question to you”
Note also that "The question to you is..." is common. Especially in debate or court proceedings. I suppose this is a case where "put" is inferred, but not said.