333 reputation
1313
bio website pignuoli.blogspot.com
location Rome, Italy
age 46
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 2 days ago
I am a mathematician and a translator from Italy.

Aug
15
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Apr
9
comment It never rains but it pours
Perhaps the meaning that is nearer to the one you describe, and that I meant is the one Wikipedia attributes to the use in statistics: «In statistics, the phrase "the rich get richer" is often used as an informal description of the behavior of Chinese restaurant processes and other preferential attachment processes, where the probability of the next outcome in a series taking on a particular value is proportional to the number of outcomes already having that particular value.»
Apr
9
answered It never rains but it pours
Mar
21
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
11
awarded  Nice Question
May
21
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
14
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
24
accepted “I have made an X to make an X”
Sep
23
comment “I have made an X to make an X”
English is not my mother tongue. Is “decision” one of the meanings of “call”? Or is it in the phrase “make a call”? I can't seem to find it in my dictionaries.
Sep
23
revised “I have made an X to make an X”
Colon
Sep
23
asked “I have made an X to make an X”
Aug
20
comment When should the word “English” be capitalized?
No, it is not obvious that a language's name is a proper noun, at least to a non-English mothertongue. Why should it be for a language and not, say, for a plant (Birch) or a tool (Hammer)? (To add something, in Italian proper nouns are capitalised too, but a language's is not considered a proper noun.)
Aug
20
comment “As old Buffle used to say”
Thanks a lot to both of you, and thanks for Shaw's quotation as well. Do you have some source, or some rationale, to believe that “Buffle” refers to Buffon in Chesterton's case?
Aug
20
comment “As old Buffle used to say”
...why the downvote?
Aug
19
asked “As old Buffle used to say”
Aug
9
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
5
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
4
comment The meaning of the word “impediment” in this context?
@brilliant: To be more on-topic: the original answerer, as you are well aware by now, was only making the point that, if one agrees with the special powers attributed to the saints, hearing many people at once is not more difficult or impossible - hence the notion of an impediment - than everything else saints are credited with (and which you apparently accept).
Mar
4
comment The meaning of the word “impediment” in this context?
@brilliant: Thanks for answering, but I still don't get it (it's me, of course). I truly do not understand what's so special about that particular word, more than about any of the other words your original answerer or everybody here use. From out here, it looks like that word, or the sentence in which it was used, has something special for you. Then again, we are not here to read in other people's mind. I hope the answers you got clarified the matter for you.