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seen Nov 24 at 19:55

Jul
11
comment Translation of German “Bolzplatz” – what's the name for an outdoor area whose purpose is to provide room for soccer/football?
Baseball field? Maybe it's regional, but where I'm from, it's a baseball diamond, or just ball diamond.
May
5
comment Best word for “Dr. Einstein, <blank> of the theory of Special Relativity.”
Why not "Albert Einstein was the originator of the theory..."?
May
11
comment Why is it ‘A God,’ not ‘God' in Mark Sanford’s “I want to acknowledge a God not just of second chances, but third, fourth, eighth chances”?
@BraddSzonye; I don't really find henotheism in the Bible. Scripture will refer to the gods of other religions as "gods", but the claim isn't simply that the God of Israel is better or the one they choose to worship--rather that they they are "no gods" or "false gods" and that the God of Israel is "the only God". I think this could be a good question for hermeneutics.stackexchange.com though!
May
10
comment Why is it ‘A God,’ not ‘God' in Mark Sanford’s “I want to acknowledge a God not just of second chances, but third, fourth, eighth chances”?
That said, his sons would have ranged in age from about 3 to 9 at the time Veggie Tales release the Jonah movie, which contained the song @JonEricson references. It is not at all unlikely that his exposure to that song was far greater than a sermon or political reference from years prior.
May
10
comment Why is it ‘A God,’ not ‘God' in Mark Sanford’s “I want to acknowledge a God not just of second chances, but third, fourth, eighth chances”?
Earliest reference I could find to the phrase is from a sermon from 1985, but there it is "the God of second chances", which is a bit different from the "a God of X" form. Bill Clinton used "a God of second chances" in 1994 on World News Tonight. Surely he's not the first politician to turn disapproval around with references to Christianity, but he does seem to have set the precedent doing so with this particular phrase.
May
31
comment A different word for “meaninglessness”
Nonsense also means lack of sense or meaning, e.g., in Logical Positivism, it can be said that anything but definition and tautology is "nonsense" or meaninglessness; thus theology and metaphysics are meaningless nonsense. This is of course a rather technical meaning, and likely not what is intended in the provided sentence
May
31
comment A different word for “meaninglessness”
Also, "He who loves money will not be satisfied with money, nor he who loves wealth with his income; this also is vanity." (Ecclesiastes 5:10 ESV)
May
31
comment A different word for “meaninglessness”
The refrain from the book of Ecclesiastes "vanity of vanities... all is vanity" is sometimes translated as "meaningless, meaningless... everything is meaningless." To that "he discovered the vanity of consumerism and work" certainly fits both in that sentence and in the sentiment of the Ecclesiastes, e.g. " What has a man from all the toil and striving of heart with which he toils beneath the sun? For all his days are full of sorrow, and his work is a vexation. Even in the night his heart does not rest. This also is vanity." (Ecclesiastes 2:22-23 ESV)
Dec
8
comment How to ask a question to get an ordinal number answer
To clarify, Obama is the 43rd individual to be president, holds the 44th presidency, and the 56th presidential term.
Dec
8
comment How to ask a question to get an ordinal number answer
-1 for factual inaccuracies. Though Obama has the 44th presidency, he is not the 44th individual to be president of the United States. Grover Cleveland was #22 and #24, which throws things off a bit. We have had 43 presidents, and 42 presidents preceded Obama.
Jun
29
comment When should “farther” and “further” be used?
What about metaphorical distance? As in "I was told to walk a mile in his shoes, but I walked [farther/further]". How about "'Did you get very far?' 'Yes, even [farther/further] than I expected to.']
Feb
2
comment What's the opposite word for “sin”?
I don't mean to get so deep here. The question sort of begs it, though.
Feb
2
comment What's the opposite word for “sin”?
The Greek word ἁμαρτία (hamartia) is one of the words used in the Bible for sin, and it does come from archery as paul mentioned. I don't believe the connection remains in English, however.