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Aug
31
comment “The Germans were attacking, and the French”. Why is it wrong?
"The Germans were attacking, and [the Germans were] French." It's as grammatical as the rest, just not with the intended meaning.
Jun
30
comment What is the word that means to accuse someone of a crime, to divert attention from the guilt of the accuser
What does biblical etymology even mean? That the word was coined by someone translating a Christian bible? Why would new words be coined in that context?
May
17
comment Is there a word to describe a person who's addicted to downloading stuff from Internet?
To be clear, inventing words is not allowed on this site. Also, a "miser" is more properly someone who avoids spending resources, not someone who collects junk.
Apr
29
comment Is there a word or an idiom for people who only spend their families' money and fool around?
I don't think "babe" is feminine. If it sounds so, say "baby."
Apr
21
comment Expression for becoming homeless, which has the word 'street' in it? How about “pushed to the streets”?
@SvenYargs Not much. Also, there's "The men will cheer and the boys will shout. The ladies they will all turn out."
Jan
8
comment Is “sub-project” more like “support project” or “child project”?
@Ooker There's no English ambiguity. The dilemma, if any, involves how things are organized in your work, and we have no idea about that. (I'd guess, though, that your boss isn't amused by taking time from your workday to quibble over her terminology.)
Jan
8
comment Is “sub-project” more like “support project” or “child project”?
This is a question about Vietnamese usage. The English usage is not in question. Seems off-topic.
Dec
23
comment Is there a word for a 60th of a second?
Tierce is an obsolete term in English for a sixtieth of a second, loaned from French. Unambiguous enough for a well-due revival, IMHO.
Sep
7
comment Difference between 'oxymoron', 'paradox', 'contradiction' and 'misnomer'
Um, king crabs are crustaceans.
Aug
18
comment Opposite of “to my credit”?
Ngrams results may be misleading. "To my shame" will include "… added to my shame," "cut to my shame," "spoke to my shame," and other incidental uses. The other alternatives to "shame" are simply less generally common.
Jul
17
comment Binary counterpart to decade
So the answer here is "power"? Given a context where many similar words are being used canonically, coining such a new definition, however closely related to existing usage, would be very confusing.
Jul
16
comment Binary counterpart to decade
@JohnY Yep, it's possible that's all that was "ringing a bell," no pun intended :) . I'll select this answer, I just invented my own specific terminology for my application. It's a numeric software library, with no relation to frequency or electronics.
Jul
15
comment Binary counterpart to decade
I'd like "binary decade" to be a real term, but Googling it only turns up references like Gnawme's, referring to decimal arithmetic implemented in binary technology. I'll accept this answer given a reference mentioning logarithms as opposed to logic circuits.
Jul
14
comment Binary counterpart to decade
@Gnawme In that source, "binary decade counter" is only a decade counter (counts by ten) which happens to be implemented in binary logic.
Jul
14
comment Is there a word which means “having a frequency of decades” or “per decade”? What about century and millennium?
"Decadal" would be an adjective for something that occurs every decade, but all the other words on this page are adverbs. "Decadally" might be a stretch.
Jun
14
comment What word best represents “academic status”?
"Educhievement."
Jun
14
comment Word for software which has been killed or is no longer supported
"Standard" has a meaning besides that something is common practice. I don't believe there is a formalized, legal definition of end-of-life so the term is not literally an industry standard.
Jun
14
comment Word for software which has been killed or is no longer supported
"Sunset" refers to a period of lingering support for previously-supported users. Use of this term tends to suggest that the vendor has internalized problems with support, that there may be a dedicated legacy-support department whose personnel motivate such euphemism. "Discontinued but supported" (or "support contracts honored") are far more understandable.
May
28
comment Participial clauses
+1. By the way, the solution to such a non sequitur is to break the sentence into two. "Harvard was founded in 1636. It is one…"
May
28
comment Is the opposite of 'within', 'without'?
@JanusBahsJacquet That usage, and other similar songs of the era, make equal sense with the word taken in the other sense as a pun. "Life flows on in your absence."