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Apr
12
revised Is there a term for “mains power” in American English?
added 227 characters in body
Apr
12
awarded  Scholar
Apr
12
awarded  Critic
Apr
12
accepted Is there a term for “mains power” in American English?
Apr
12
comment Is there a term for “mains power” in American English?
AC power is very suitable, unless there is another AC power source in the device. Grid power also works, unless the device interfaces with the actual grid side. I guess I just happen to be in a confusing position…
Apr
12
awarded  Student
Apr
11
comment Is there a term for “mains power” in American English?
Well… if the generator powers the wall outlets…
Apr
11
asked Is there a term for “mains power” in American English?
Apr
7
comment Is there a difference between “vice”, “deputy”, “associate”, and “assistant” as descriptive job titles?
@Matt: True, and I see Colin has some other examples above. Anyway, "executive and subordinate" still holds. Vice-principals are executive in theory at least, although in most cases deputy would really fit better, and some schools do call them assistant principals.
Apr
7
answered Is there a difference between “vice”, “deputy”, “associate”, and “assistant” as descriptive job titles?
Apr
7
comment Is there a difference between “vice”, “deputy”, “associate”, and “assistant” as descriptive job titles?
Vice usually combines only with president, as far as I know. Because the word has another meaning, a "vice manager" sounds like someone who would be fun, but I unfortunately don't work in that kind of industry.
Feb
28
comment “Weapon platform” or “weapons platform”?
What? What does this all mean? The plural of a noun can also be used a modifier, right? Also, "64-bit" cannot be used as a noun, supposing that's the intent of the first example.
Feb
28
answered “Weapon platform” or “weapons platform”?
Feb
16
comment Is there a word to describe a highly desirable cursed treasure?
Always reminds me of Homer Simpson, "mmmm, forbidden doughnut." Forbidden fruit fits very well for certain kinds of curses.
Feb
12
comment Too, two, and to
Five ways, then: Phonetic /tu/ is certainly a spelling. Of course, there's really just one way to spell each word.
Feb
11
comment A word which comes with meaning like “something that works in parallel”
@infant: Concurrence means two things happen at the same time, simultaneously. Complementary means they benefit each other. The meanings are quite different, so be sure to choose what you mean.
Feb
10
answered A word which comes with meaning like “something that works in parallel”
Feb
10
comment Too, two, and to
That makes four ways…
Feb
7
answered Why is New York City also called “the Big Apple”?
Feb
7
comment Origin of the meaning of joe
@Kiam: It is not used with "average," but neither is it used alone. It is an idiomatic phrase.