317 reputation
1410
bio website stackoverflow.com/questions/…
location Earth, TX
age 44
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Feb 4 at 17:37
Oh gawd, I never fill these out

Jan
20
accepted “Leave for <time>”
Jan
19
comment “Leave for <time>”
Nope, the speakers agrees with what I heard, and definitely intended "be there at 6:30pm". Speaker was Canadian of Ukrainian/Irish ancestry (a few generations removed). There is some odd colloquialisms that come out of the Ukrainian side: Open/close the light. Borrow me a pencil. Reach me the glass
Jan
17
comment “Leave for <time>”
It was actually said to me. It could be a colloquialism particular to the speaker's ethnic group. My interpretation was that they wanted me to leave BEfore 6:30p.m. - if you leave any time before 6:30p.m., you will be on time. They actually meant I needed to arrive at 6:30p.m. What was omitted is was "to get there" between leave and for.
Jan
17
asked “Leave for <time>”
Apr
19
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
5
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
2
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
11
awarded  Good Question
Jul
31
awarded  Caucus
May
4
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
17
comment Why A is pronounced differently in “opacity” and “opaque”
Argh... another rule in English learned by route rather than being explicitly stated. I did a review of some of the other words ending in "[aeiou]city", and agree they all soften the vowel.
Nov
17
accepted Why A is pronounced differently in “opacity” and “opaque”
Nov
17
awarded  Editor
Nov
17
revised Why A is pronounced differently in “opacity” and “opaque”
Fixed the list in the V+que pattern section
Nov
17
suggested suggested edit on Why A is pronounced differently in “opacity” and “opaque”
Aug
30
asked Why A is pronounced differently in “opacity” and “opaque”
Aug
16
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
14
awarded  Yearling
Jul
13
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
13
comment Can a sentence start with “Because”?
@Atomix - which reminds me of the famous Victor Borge Phonetic Punctuation youtube.com/watch?v=lF4qii8S3gw