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seen Jun 5 '13 at 18:38

May
5
comment Should “append to” be “append too”?
@rhetorician. Attach and append mean different things, although their connotation is similar. To attach means to lay hold of, or to seize. The implication is that when you lay hold of something, the two are not separate (so long as it is held). To append means to hang or suspend something upon something else. The implication is that the weight is borne by something else. By further extension, we gain the (very old) legal term to append, which means roughly to make a thing possessed. I suppose in your example it is possessed in terms of legal responsibility.
May
5
comment Technicalities about “%”?
Collectives may take either a plural or a singular noun according to whether they are considered one thing (of which there are many parts) or many things (which are alike in kind). Also, as was pointed out in the original question, the % sign is short hand for the propositional phrase "per one hundred." But such a prepositional phrase has no bearing on the number of the subject (and therefore the plurality of the verb), nor on any following prepositional phrase (such as the partitive genitive in this case).
May
3
answered “Sent” vs “sent off” vs “sent out”
May
2
answered “1–2 minutes” or “1–2 minute(s)”
May
1
answered Can we say “probable” where we have to say “possible”?
Apr
30
awarded  Teacher
Apr
29
answered Understanding “as of”, “as at”, and “as from”