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Oct
25
comment “Authorization” vs “Authorisation” - I'm in some real dilemma
Oxford's use of -ize and -ization is one of the areas where it does not reflect common current British usage
Oct
16
comment Confused about the verb “relax” which means “make or become less tense or anxious”?
I would have thought (2) might suggest "I am not tense or anxious"
Oct
14
comment “To be prepared” - Verb tense question
Most people who prepare do it before the event. Indeed the pre- prefix suggests this.Alternatively, compare the correct "you are more prepared" with the incorrect "you are more prepare".
Oct
8
comment What is the origin of the exclamation mark?
Not having a separate typewriter key was nothing special: 1 (one) could be replaced by l (lower case L) and 0 (zero) by O (upper case o).
Oct
6
comment Is it correct to say “the last word but three”?
@bib I do not need credit.
Oct
6
comment Is it correct to say “the last word but three”?
@bib: I am not sure why you have a hyphen in preantepenultimate
Sep
26
comment If God did not exist, He would have to be invented
Especially since Voltaire did not say "Si Dieu n'existait pas, il faudrait l'inventer" in English.
Sep
26
comment What is the correct way to write the word “back-end”?
Google ngrams suggest that back-end and backend have increased in popularity recently
Sep
23
comment Blank Questions in GRE
It needs to fit the "since the subject matter ... high art" part too, and irrelevant does not.
Sep
23
comment Blank Questions in GRE
For the same reason as surprising being the best fit in my comment. The other two do not quite fit.
Sep
23
comment Usage of 'can't'
It rather depends on whether you have already done the other questions or not. Grammatically, both are correct, but they mean different things.
Sep
23
comment Blank Questions in GRE
Given the GRE style of question, it is not ________ that the answer is surprising, as the other two might read oddly in the context.
Sep
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
8
comment Why does English have an indefinite article?
Examples of definite articles only include Icelandic and (arguably) Ancient Greek. Icelandic almost developed an indefinite article in the 16th and 17th centuries under Danish influence but this was later reversed with the rise of linguistic nationalism.
Sep
8
comment When is “Mains” or “grid” no longer the correct electrical term?
Mains means connected to the external utility network (electricity, gas, water, sewerage etc.). So in your example, a "mains" car would have to be connected to the wall permanently: the length of the electrical cable might restrict its operating range.
Aug
31
comment What is the plural form of “status”?
@ShreevatsaR radii
Aug
30
comment Is the word “acronym”, in fact, clearly defined?
There are many English words which different people use in different ways. Acronym is an example, as your post and the introduction and first section of the Wikipedia article state. It can be clearly defined, but other people will go on using it in different ways, and English has no accepted prescriptive authority.
Aug
30
comment is it correct to use 'often a times'?
As far as I can tell, "oftentimes" (or "ofttimes") can almost always be replaced by "often", and probably should be. By contrast I would suggest that "often at times" is best used as part of a longer phrase such as "They always went to church at least once a week, more often at times" or "She reported from many countries, often at times of conflict".
Aug
25
comment Is there a word for a 'person who likes bubbles'?
@SomethingDark: looking at the Greek usage, I would guess more like pompholugophile with a -g- in the stem
Aug
11
comment that clause and omitting relative pronoun
You have omitted "that was", not just "that"