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May
29
comment Is it common to use the borrowed noun-adjective form for borrowed French phrases?
It does, but before 2006 the UK had the plural issue of courts martial and solved the problem by only having one.
May
29
answered Is it common to use the borrowed noun-adjective form for borrowed French phrases?
May
29
answered Origin of “hating on”
May
29
answered Which term is correct — “Afghan” or “Afghani”?
May
28
comment What's the difference between a jumper, a pullover, and a sweater?
This reminds me of the children's joke. What do get if you cross a sheep with a kangaroo? A woolly jumper.
May
27
awarded  Nice Answer
May
26
awarded  Enlightened
May
25
comment How did the letter Z come to be associated with sleeping/snoring?
i.e. an onomatopoeia for snoring
May
25
answered Put two and two together…and got five?
May
25
answered What do you call a letter saying that you are amenable of a request?
May
24
answered Alternative to “lossily compressed”
May
24
answered “Today I've darkened 59 appropriate circles”?
May
23
comment Grandma and Nan, origins and differences?
I suspect the grand- is more Romance than Germanic: compare French grand-père with German Großvater. On the other hand great-, as in great-grandfather, is Germanic.
May
23
answered Can you actually “stand to the right” on escalator?
May
23
answered Is there a way to transform “found” to stand for “things which have been found”?
May
20
comment In “Winnie the Pooh”, Why isn't the Hundred Acre Wood plural?
From the title, I thought you were going to ask about the alternative Hundred Acres Wood — to which the response would have been that nouns used as adjectives tend not to decline, e.g. multi-million dollar project.
May
20
comment What is the origin of “your mother” as an answer to any question?
In Mexico, foreigners are advised never to say madre (standard Spanish for mother). Use the less controversial term mama or mamá instead. There are a few idioms or set phrases where it is acceptable, but they are so specific that it is better not to use the term at all.
May
20
awarded  Enlightened
May
20
comment Why would the “wind blowing in the East” be considered a bad thing?
@PLL: Over the last five years the typical wind direction in Cambridge has been South South West
May
18
answered Is it “flavor saver” or “flavor savor”?