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Apr
23
answered Does “oath” have an implied religious connotation?
Apr
22
revised Does English have “plural” verb forms?
3 p sing
Apr
22
answered Does English have “plural” verb forms?
Apr
22
comment Is there a version of brunch for a meal between dinner and lunch?
Dinner has traditionally been the largest meal of the day, whatever time it is eaten
Apr
21
comment Analyzing Will Ferrell's “I Thought” joke
@LarsH: My view is that to get your meaning you need the final "I thought". Even if what he had originally thought was not what he thought he had originally thought, it was (by definition) what he had originally thought.
Apr
21
comment What does “There but for the grace of God — goes God.” mean?
@Louis: The Marxist evangelical Christian Stafford Cripps was often seen as puritan and sanctimonius, particularly by Churchill who was his opposite both in politics and lifestyle; Churchill was suggesting that Cripps thought of himself as being as good as God, or perhaps better.
Apr
20
answered What's a good word for displayed non-frozen non-canned vegetables in the grocery store?
Apr
20
comment “Touch base” vs “Touch bases”?
Might it be a Baseball idiom?
Apr
20
revised “of the feudal Estates type” or “of the feudal-Estates type”?
verb typo
Apr
18
comment “Why …?” vs. “Why is it that … ?”
You have to be more careful with the negative of the first question because it is more convoluted: I think "Why isn't it that everybody wants to help me?" would be wrong while "Why doesn't everybody want to help me?" is fine.
Apr
16
comment What do “Tea-Paw” and “Tea-Paw Tax double header” mean?
Tax just means his speeches were about taxation, a topic of particular interest to the Tea Party. The original Boston Tea Party was a protest organised by smugglers objecting to cheap legal tea undercutting their business.
Apr
15
answered What do “Tea-Paw” and “Tea-Paw Tax double header” mean?
Apr
15
answered Is the conditional a mood or a tense?
Apr
12
comment Why do they say “love fifteen,” in tennis?
You have had explanations of love. The fifteen may come from a clock and means you have a quarter of the points needed to win the game. Or it may come from positions in the French jeu de paume.
Apr
12
comment Why do they say “love fifteen,” in tennis?
The French don't use love, but more oddly they don't use deuce (à deux) either.
Apr
12
comment Why did this Brit say “took a punt”?
In Rugby football, a punt can be picked up by the same team if they get there first (which is unlikely but not impossible), and so is not the automatic turnover that it is in American football. Try from 0:49 of this
Apr
11
comment Are any of the t-glottolization, th-fronting, h-dropping, etc. in English a phonological complex?
You can see centuries-old h-dropping and th-fronting among the educated in Gulliver's Travels when Swift uses both Redriff (Pepys and Evelyn used Redriffe) and Rotherhith (now Rotherhithe) as Gulliver's home.
Apr
9
answered Other words/expressions for “mathematical equation”
Apr
6
answered How to properly use “lump sum”
Apr
5
revised When to use “has lived” vs. “lived” vs. “had lived”
another past example