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seen Aug 13 at 22:53

Mar
22
answered “Influence of media in our lives,” or “influence of media on our lives?”
Mar
22
comment “Leaving a field intact for a season”
In the European Union bureaucracy, the modern word is set-aside, part of paying farmers not to grow things.
Mar
22
answered Is this grammatical?
Mar
22
comment Is this grammatical?
It is clearly nonsense. I might almost understand something like 'If I had had to have, having previously had had, it wouldn't be so difficult. But since I have not had to have, not previously having had had, it will be difficult.' But this is not what you had.
Mar
21
comment Differences between “technic” and “technique”
@HuBeZa: Apparently Hemmingway used it once, so I would hesitate to say it cannot be used in normal speech. I could imagine a speculative fiction novel where members of the engineering class are called Technics. It is the stem of words like pyrotechnics and polytechnic. But I think it should be avoided in normal use when techniques can be used instead.
Mar
21
answered Differences between “technic” and “technique”
Mar
21
comment “Chair” or “chairman?”
I once saw a conference report which said "the floor withdrew its support from the chair and the platform" prompting ideas of physical collapse. But, within reason, you should call people what they want to be called.
Mar
21
answered What expression do you have in English as a counterpart to Japanese saying “Earthquake, Thunderbolt, Fire and Father"?
Mar
20
comment What is the difference between American and British pronunciations of “world” and “girl”?
@Neil Coffey: You are probably right. I am used to various Irish and Shropshire relations who change register and become less rhotic and more London RP as they become more careful in their speech; it sounds to me more of a fading away than a shift - so much so that I cannot tell when it has gone.
Mar
20
answered What is the difference between American and British pronunciations of “world” and “girl”?
Mar
19
comment “ou” versus “o” in spelling words like “color”/“colour”
In I asked him what colour he wanted, and he said "I'm no good at picking colors" it is beyond subtly to use the change of spelling simply to imply an American accent for the whole phrase.
Mar
19
comment Contemporary native English words with diacritics
whereäs has been used, most recently in 1997 by some Japanese scientists. So it is very rare. I would not use it.
Mar
19
answered Usage of hyphen in “oft-cited”
Mar
19
comment Contemporary native English words with diacritics
See this old discussion of whereäs
Mar
19
comment Contemporary native English words with diacritics
That depends on what you mean by modern, native and indeed English. There are invented proper names such as Mötley Crüe or Häagen-Dazs, designed to look exotic. There are fiancé and fiancée which, like blond and blonde, have an unpronounced gender distinction. But I would not characterise any of these as modern native English.
Mar
18
answered Contemporary native English words with diacritics
Mar
18
answered Difference between “stir up” and “provoke”
Mar
17
comment How should I use “passive-aggressive” as an adverb?
@MrHen: There are plenty where the first adjective applies to the second, though use of the hyphen varies. Small-minded man, double-barrelled name, and upper-class accent might be examples.
Mar
17
comment Are there pangrams shorter than ‘the quick brown fox jumps over a lazy dog’?
The quick brown fox jumps over a lazy dog
Mar
14
answered What does the word 'carcareal' mean when referring to policies?