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seen Apr 16 at 21:38

Mar
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
12
comment “I just ate them” and “I've just eaten them” — What's the difference in American and in British?
+1: That is how I would use the phrases using British English. The second could also take an ambiguous simply meaning in "What have you done with the apples?" "I've just eaten them, nothing else" but the a moment ago would still probably be more common.
Mar
12
answered “It would not do to confuse the nurses with the patients”
Mar
11
comment UK English: Is “dived” a valid word?
Dove is certainly rare as a verb in British English. I had a mathematics teacher who used it as an affectation, so much so that he sometimes even used it as the present tense; he also wrote shew rather than show, for much the same reason.
Mar
11
comment What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?”
But you could say "Why has this painting been valued at $3 million? I don't think it's really worth $3 million", and I would have thought valued at $3 million would be an adjectival phrase, making worth $3 million an adjectival phrase in the same position, and worth an adjective as the core of the phrase.
Mar
11
answered What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?”
Mar
11
answered What is the difference between “abduct” and “kidnap”?
Mar
11
comment “Everybody is not” vs “Not everybody is”
The usage may be common, but it is ambiguous and to me an indicator of careless speech.
Mar
10
answered Biweekly, bimonthly, semi-confused
Mar
10
comment Arrange, settle, reconcile — could these words be used before “their differences”?
Try using "their accounts" instead of "their difficulties" to understand the differences in meaning. Only settle really has the implication of ending them.
Mar
9
comment What's the difference between these sentences?
In the last, being doen't make much difference; including it may slightly increase the suggestion that he did not pick the books up. But I think the earlier two suggestions flow better.
Mar
9
answered What's the difference between these sentences?
Mar
9
comment Are there any rules governing what we call people from different countries?
people from Sweden = Swedes is an alternative
Mar
8
answered What is the distinction between “role” and “rôle” [with a circumflex]?
Mar
8
comment Is it 'Close to the chest' or 'Close to the vest'?
I have never personally heard close to the vest in the UK, and would have guessed it was American prudery of the kind which got The King's Speech an R rating from the MPAA. Some searching suggests that the vest version is in fact much rarer than chest and is used both sides of the Atlantic.
Mar
7
comment Using “allium” as an adjective
What's wrong with garlicky?
Mar
7
answered Correct usage of “parallel” versus “in parallel” versus “parallelly”
Mar
7
comment What does “punch line” mean?
That is how I read it.
Mar
7
answered What does “punch line” mean?
Mar
6
comment Are “zugzwang”, “catch-22” and “catch-33” synonyms?
@Peter Shor: as I said, it is formally defined otherwise. But with good chess players, one is in zugzwang because the other has planned to get to a winning (or in some cases drawing) position and has realised the consequences of the particular position earlier.