Reputation
13,044
Top tag
Next privilege 15,000 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
2 27 45
Impact
~1.1m people reached

Dec
7
comment The Equivalent Term for Pharmacy in the UK
In the 19th century there was a difference between a pharmacy and a chemist and druggist's shop. The later term became shortened to a chemist's, often with a pharmacy counter within it. Sir Richard Robinson was an example of a chemist and druggist who owned pharmacies and employed pharmacists
Dec
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
27
comment What's a common phrase that means “To put it simply though not 100% correctly”?
Handwaving might fit this list
Nov
17
comment Pronunciation of “I'd like” and “You've got”
For some readers, gotta (as opposed to the more careful got to) would be pronounced with a glottal stop.
Nov
16
answered Genre restrictions
Nov
15
comment 'The Underlying Ethos'
I suspect you are correct, but it also conveys an impression of unstated, as any attempt to describe what lay behind Thatcherism tended to be superficial or incomplete.
Nov
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
3
answered How did 'undertake' evolve to mean 'take on'?
Oct
31
comment A one-off action or a series of actions in the past?
Think about "When Jack finished all the shopping, he went to the café" and whether it suggests a single event
Oct
12
answered Why does U sound like W in words like “penguin”?
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
30
answered “You and me against the world” vs “You and I against the world”
Sep
30
comment practice vs practise sentence question
So for example "She needs more English practice" and "He needs to practise English more"
Sep
26
comment Opposite of “Save” with respect to saving in a list
You might do better at ux.stackexchange.com
Sep
23
comment Can “Mr”, “Mrs”, etc. be used with a first name?
40 years ago, "Mrs Anne Marks" would have suggested she was a divorcée. Usage has changed since then.
Sep
19
comment “Quyer” When and why did the spelling change so drastically?
The carol The Holly and the Ivy had the refrain "The playing of the merry organ, sweet singing in the quire" though apparently "choir" started to be the spelling of the final word from the late 19th century.
Sep
19
comment Is the plural form of “Mercedes” a disused word?
In the original Spanish, Mercedes is already a plural form, literally (Mary of the) Mercies, as are the names Dolores (sorrows) and Nieves (snows)
Sep
19
comment Why are Leicester & co pronounced as they are?
Then there is Leominster, pronounced Le'm'ster
Sep
5
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
5
awarded  Nice Answer