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age 51
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen 49 mins ago

Jul
1
comment What to call the area where the hair directions all change on the head?
Wikipedia calls this a tuft
Jun
17
comment Accents of characters in Downton Abbey
Just for the record, Downton Abbey is an ITV production, and has nothing to do with the BBC
Jun
16
awarded  Constituent
Jun
12
comment Hypernyms for restaurant dishes
In the US, the main course is often called the entrée, just to confuse Europeans
Jun
12
comment Hypernym for “import” and “export”?
and sometimes just trade, as in "balance of trade"
Jun
9
awarded  Caucus
Jun
3
comment An Exocentric compound for Children
@pavja2: I suspect he means something like the "Holy Roman Empire" which was said not to be holy, Roman or an empire. But something children would appreciate.
May
31
comment What would you call a person from India?
In English "Hindu" (like the Spanish "Indú") traditionally used to mean "of India", as in the lingua franca "Hindustani" or the mountains of the "Hindu Kush". But now it is taken to be religious.
May
28
comment Is there a word which describes being unable to see the stars because of the brightness of the moon?
It may be difficult to show outshined is the common usage, except perhaps in a shoe-shining competition
May
24
comment That's the way it worked
@Mike: You can shorten that has to that's as in "That's worked", giving you a past (or perfect) tense.
May
16
comment “Rogative” root (as in prerogative, derogative, interrogative)
Prerogative is "one person one vote" taken to an distorted extreme: the person with the prerogative is asked first and then nobody else is asked.
May
3
comment How do you denote date and time in written English?
It is a matter of personal style. I would say "Could we meet on Wednesday 28 May at 1:45pm?" and I would expect to be understood.
Apr
23
comment This is [adj] is what this is
"This is humiliating beyond belief" would be standard English.
Apr
16
comment A word for old-fashioned, dirty bar/place (spit-and-sawdust)
The Regency Café in your picture is rather smart in an art deco style, with a wider menu and fresher food than most greasy spoons.
Apr
16
comment A word for old-fashioned, dirty bar/place (spit-and-sawdust)
In Britain many public houses (pubs) used to have two bars: a public bar and a saloon bar. The saloon bar would be more up-market, perhaps have a dress code, and possibly higher priced drinks.
Apr
2
comment How to say formally 'once he paid off all the debt'
debt to rather then from
Mar
29
answered List semi-colons?
Mar
13
comment Is “statistics” singular or plural?
I do not see the first version as correct. You could have "Statistics shows how to handle data systematically", but the academic study of statistics does not show how fertile people are over time; only the numbers show that.
Mar
12
comment Negation of auxiliary
How would you parse "He isn't right"? "He is clever but not right"?
Mar
9
comment When to use “has lived” vs. “lived” vs. “had lived”
By the way, Jim died in 2013 aged 93.