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Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
30
answered “You and me against the world” vs “You and I against the world”
Sep
30
comment practice vs practise sentence question
So for example "She needs more English practice" and "He needs to practise English more"
Sep
26
comment Opposite of “Save” with respect to saving in a list
You might do better at ux.stackexchange.com
Sep
23
comment Can “Mr”, “Mrs”, etc. be used with a first name?
40 years ago, "Mrs Anne Marks" would have suggested she was a divorcée. Usage has changed since then.
Sep
19
comment “Quyer” When and why did the spelling change so drastically?
The carol The Holly and the Ivy had the refrain "The playing of the merry organ, sweet singing in the quire" though apparently "choir" started to be the spelling of the final word from the late 19th century.
Sep
19
comment Is the plural form of “Mercedes” a disused word?
In the original Spanish, Mercedes is already a plural form, literally (Mary of the) Mercies, as are the names Dolores (sorrows) and Nieves (snows)
Sep
19
comment Why are Leicester & co pronounced as they are?
Then there is Leominster, pronounced Le'm'ster
Sep
5
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
3
comment Single word for “more than once”
Patent law is not a good guide to English usage. For example you cannot make multiple claims in a single statement, discouraging the use of or such as in phases like "It uses fluorine, chlorine or bromine". The patent lawyers then rewrite this as "It uses one of fluorine, chlorine and bromine" thereby undermining both the legal rule on multiple claims and the standard use of English.
Sep
3
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
12
comment “Disbalanced” vs. “unbalanced”
The ngram is very strange as it tells me 'Search for "disbalanced" yielded only one result' even though it then gives me over 200 examples
Aug
12
comment “Disbalanced” vs. “unbalanced”
@virmaior: try Google books for recent examples though the names of many of the authors suggest English might not be their first language
Aug
6
comment Which is correct, “sales price” or “sale price”?
And indeed, a quick search shows numerous examples contrasting sale price with purchase price where sale price does not imply a discount.
Aug
6
comment Which is correct, “sales price” or “sale price”?
I would not regard that distinction as being authoritative, as both are clearly ambiguous, at least in the UK. Personally I would expect "sales price" to be suggestive of a discounted price during the post-Christmas "sales"
Jul
18
comment On the specifics of illegitimate children
nothus, notus or gnotus literally means known and should decline in agreement with its noun. In this context it should be for illegitimate children recognised by their fathers. If unrecognised, ignotus would be the better Latin.
Jul
7
comment What does “soda” mean in places where it doesn't mean soft drink?
Soda water would traditionally from a syphon.