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Jan
4
comment What is the proper usage of “Y'all” in southern American dialects
I would have thought a closer Spanish equivalent of y'all might be vosotros (you and others) rather than ustedes (your graces, a 3rd person construction).
Jan
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
4
comment Why “the powers that be”?
@Araucaria: because that is how certain people wrote English in the 16th century, translating a present participle from Greek that might be read more literally as something like "authorities in being". I have no idea of the exact nuance: perhaps it suggests not just the Roman authorities at the moment Paul was writing in the 1st century but also those that later came into existence.
Jan
3
answered Why “the powers that be”?
Dec
17
comment What is the meaning of active service and active services in the context of corporations?
I might guess that active services could refer to services provided outside the corporate group and its employees
Dec
17
comment What is the meaning of active service and active services in the context of corporations?
Context might help
Dec
15
comment Using ' – ' in a sentence?
See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dash#Parentheses-like_use for this kind of use of the em dash
Dec
10
comment Can anyone locate the paragraph from Laurence Sterne (1700's) on the word “cool”?
archive.org/stream/worksoflaurences00ster#page/152/mode/2up/… will give some pointers (at the bottom of the page) to Sterne's use of the word "cool"
Dec
4
comment declined to override a veto - is that a Yes or a No?
Was the veto confirmed or not overturned? Article V Section I Paragraph 14 of the New Jersey constitution hardly helps.
Dec
4
answered How can I replace the verb references here?
Dec
1
comment Is there a male counterpart to being a virgin?
@otakucode: When? The 13th centrury barely counts, while maiden is a rather different word
Nov
30
comment Pronoun in English without specific referent
I have also seen French and Spanish speakers use an impersonal one excessively in English and make it seem too formal. Informally an impersonal you is commonly used, but this does not work in academic writing. Some writers default to we to mean the writer(s), reader and everybody else.
Nov
30
comment When did men start to lose their “virginity”?
@Rathony: that is rather the point. Three lines earlier you have the explicit "whether it be man or woman, that lives in virginity"
Nov
30
comment When did men start to lose their “virginity”?
Not that it helps much, but there are several versions, with four of them published together. This quote can be seen near the bottom of this page
Nov
27
answered Is 'had have + past participle' a correct grammatical form?
Nov
22
comment What is Josh doing?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joshua_Reynolds to read more about Sir Joshua Reynolds and see some of his other self-portraits
Nov
22
comment “Cry foul” - is foul a noun?
Foul is a noun in the Laws of the Game of association football, especially Law 12. So crying "Foul!" can be using an adjective or noun (or perhaps as an imperative verb, inciting cheating),
Nov
21
comment Why don't we say things are pervious?
According to Google ngrams, pervious used to be more common than permeable until about 1867, and is still used
Nov
17
answered what does “to which it is a party” mean in this setence?
Nov
16
comment “Scalp a Ticket” vs “Resell a Ticket”
"Ticket scalpers" in AmE are "ticket touts" in BrE