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1d
comment Am I correct to say: “After integration, be sure that you have updated all the above mentioned changes as per HTML Pages given”?
as per is neither English nor Latin and in any case does not seem to fit here, while "the above mentioned changes" would read better as "the changes mentioned above".
Jul
24
comment Not beginning a sentence with “For”
I might prefer "afterwards" rather than a naked "after". "For" at the start would be an improvement if all you have is a comma between the two parts of the sentence.
Jul
24
comment Why do people put 'had' in front of past tense verbs?
To take the start: "The etched glass goblet sat on an exquisite marble countertop. ... The hotel hadn't placed it there. Someone else had." This is fine, describing what had and had not happened before the start of the story. The word placed is a participle.
Jul
18
comment On the specifics of illegitimate children
nothus, notus or gnotus literally means known and should decline in agreement with its noun. In this context it should be for illegitimate children recognised by their fathers. If unrecognised, ignotus would be the better Latin.
Jul
13
comment Improvement on James while John had had
Your first example is meaningless without punctuation: it is in effect two sentences and so need a conjunction or at least a colon or semi-colon. In your later examples, the repeated use of the past perfect or pluperfect (more than just a past participle) seems unnatural without any use of the simple past tense, as does the lack of contrast between James and John or with what the teacher liked.
Jul
7
comment What does “soda” mean in places where it doesn't mean soft drink?
Soda water would traditionally from a syphon.
Jul
7
comment What does “soda” mean in places where it doesn't mean soft drink?
In the UK and Canada, soda water now has sodium bicarbonate as a flavouring, as a distinction from plain carbonated water. Hence a Whisky & soda
Jul
5
comment “On the equivalence of A and B” or “between A and B”
@Scott: I do not think you can say that as a definitive rule. See an earlier question
Jul
5
comment could be or could have been stolen?
The original frame, which was made of gold, was replaced with a marble one before it could be stolen also means the frame was replaced before it had the opportunity of being stolen
Jul
4
answered Is usage of “Yours sincerely” still appropriate?
Jul
1
comment What to call the area where the hair directions all change on the head?
Wikipedia calls this a tuft
Jun
17
comment Accents of characters in Downton Abbey
Just for the record, Downton Abbey is an ITV production, and has nothing to do with the BBC
Jun
16
awarded  Constituent
Jun
12
comment Hypernyms for restaurant dishes
In the US, the main course is often called the entrée, just to confuse Europeans
Jun
12
comment Hypernym for “import” and “export”?
and sometimes just trade, as in "balance of trade"
Jun
9
awarded  Caucus
Jun
3
comment An Exocentric compound for Children
@pavja2: I suspect he means something like the "Holy Roman Empire" which was said not to be holy, Roman or an empire. But something children would appreciate.
May
31
comment What would you call a person from India?
In English "Hindu" (like the Spanish "Indú") traditionally used to mean "of India", as in the lingua franca "Hindustani" or the mountains of the "Hindu Kush". But now it is taken to be religious.
May
28
comment Is there a word which describes being unable to see the stars because of the brightness of the moon?
It may be difficult to show outshined is the common usage, except perhaps in a shoe-shining competition
May
24
comment That's the way it worked
@Mike: You can shorten that has to that's as in "That's worked", giving you a past (or perfect) tense.