169 reputation
6
bio website andy.roon.us
location Michigan
age 38
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Sep 11 at 18:27
Mostly harmless network administrator at a small company.

Sep
11
awarded  Critic
Sep
11
comment A little brain fart
Generally 'having a moment' refers to someone having a tantrum or otherwise being unsuitable for the company of others, no?
Dec
11
awarded  Scholar
Dec
11
accepted How (and when) was it that the verb 'go' began to mean 'say' in common usage?
Nov
15
comment How (and when) was it that the verb 'go' began to mean 'say' in common usage?
@Chris Agreed. That, I'm sure, is why my teachers didn't like it. It enables expressive, if not intellectual laziness. On the other hand, as FumbleFingers notes on Lawler's answer below and Hugo above, in many ways we embody our message, i.e. we can 'be all' <message>. That, in essence is (I think) what Lawler was getting at with the metaphorical topics he brought to the table.
Nov
15
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
14
comment How (and when) was it that the verb 'go' began to mean 'say' in common usage?
Purely awesome. I suppose I was thinking of the metaphors and the underlying constructs, and I did think of the "He's like..." construction being related, but your other references are great at pinning down what I was actually thinking. Thanks for a well-put answer, with lots of great additional material!
Nov
14
comment How (and when) was it that the verb 'go' began to mean 'say' in common usage?
Wow. That is not what I expected. Interesting. I suppose the first thought I should have when wondering about language usage is "probably Dickens."
Nov
14
comment What is the term for those cylindrical metal or plastic protrusions?
Often colloquially referred to by myself and other fixers-of-things as 'pins' if smaller than, say, pencil-sized.
Nov
14
awarded  Student
Nov
14
asked How (and when) was it that the verb 'go' began to mean 'say' in common usage?
Mar
30
comment Is it acceptable to use “especially” at the beginning of a sentence?
+1 for 'makes you look like a twit'
Jan
28
awarded  Supporter
Jan
28
comment Is there a word that means “doing the right thing for the wrong reason”?
I agree wholeheartedly on the second half, about getting a correct result from incorrect presumption: unwittingly is a perfect word for that. But acting unwittingly carries a connotation (to me) of acting with incomplete knowledge versus a wrong reason. I agree it's probably the best word so far, +1.
Jan
28
awarded  Autobiographer