11,151 reputation
41957
bio website zanyphoto.com
location San Jose, CA
age 42
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen yesterday

Software engineer, photographer, musician, and gamer.


Nov
10
comment Why was Tokyo sometimes called “Tokio”?
It's implied, but for folks who don't already know Japanese it's easy to misunderstand the difference between Japanese kyo-o and English ki-yo. Not sure how important that is, just thought you might want to be more explicit in comparing the two.
Nov
10
comment Why was Tokyo sometimes called “Tokio”?
One subtlety that's easy to overlook here is that not only does Tokyo have more "syllables" in Japanese, they're also split up differently. The Japanese is roughly To-oh-kyo-oh, rather than the Toh-ki-oh common in English.
Sep
9
comment Why is it that Frisian is considered the closest related language to English?
@JanusBahsJacquet I replaced the bogus factoid with some stuff that is hopefully more accurate!
Aug
25
comment What is the meaning of “A.C. or D.C.?”
There’s a notable use in the Sweet song “AC/DC” which has been covered by Joan Jett in 2006 and Vince Neil in 2010.
Aug
25
comment Numeric abbreviations in business quotes
As Patrick M notes in his answer to my question, M and K actually are ambiguous in some contexts and require more than a general reference to explain.
Aug
25
comment Numeric abbreviations in business quotes
Thanks for pointing that out! I'd never heard of it. Since it appears to be technical jargon rooted in Latin, it might still be off topic, but it's good to have the information. Maybe I'll edit my answer if I have time.
Aug
15
comment 'Enjoy the rest of your day'. What is the name for such expressions?
Parting phrases are usually called valedictions rather than salutations, but I suppose that either word could fit here.
Aug
15
comment 'Enjoy the rest of your day'. What is the name for such expressions?
The pleasantries at the ends of letters (“Sincerely yours”) are also valedictions. The greetings at the beginning are called salutations.
Jul
18
comment How to understand these verses from the poem “The road not taken” by Robert Frost
I've heard that Frost wrote this poem to tease a friend who was very indecisive, and so it's meant to be taken literally, except for the last line which is sarcastic.
Jun
11
comment What do you call someone who is so inappropriate that they are appropriate?
I know a few people like this. Some are seen as charming/funny, some merely tolerated. +1
Jun
7
comment Origin of “riff”
Wow, thank you for the excellent review of the available evidence! The verb/gerund examples are especially interesting, as they imply a somewhat different meaning than the word has now. Thanks!
Jun
7
comment Origin of “riff”
That seems plausible. Any references you may have would be useful, although I understand that they're often problematic when it comes to jazz jargon.
Jun
7
comment Origin of “riff”
@rhetorician Yes, that’s one of the possibilities mentioned in the question. I’m more interested in the evidence backing each of the options and whether any of it is potentially conclusive.
Jun
7
comment Origin of “riff”
@JohnLawler I agree – and there’s a pretty good discussion of some of that in the references linked from my question, like the bit on other artists “riffing.” I’m just hoping that there might be something more solid in literature or less accessible references.
Jun
6
comment Connotations of Letter 'X'
Thanks for expanding on that! I didn't know about the circle. Anyway, I suspect there is a lot of cross-pollination, mutual influence, between all of these loosely related "unknown" uses of X.
Jun
6
comment Connotations of Letter 'X'
Do you have any idea whether "x marks the spot" or X for signing names/marks is connected to these other reasons?
May
24
comment Shoot and intentionally miss
@Peteris Warning shots are generally still quite near the target, to make sure that the target is aware of the warning and your ability to shoot on target. This usage seems fine for the context.
May
15
comment What measures the Byte unit?
Storage is OK for measuring bandwidth, because you can think of it as “storage transferred per unit of time.” But other words like capacity or information might be an even better fit for that context. Perhaps just suggest both storage and capacity?
May
15
comment What measures the Byte unit?
I would have gone with storage as it applies well to short-term storage like RAM and long-term storage like disk or flash, although capacity is perhaps a better term when it comes to things like throughput and bandwidth. +1
May
10
comment What do CI, CIM, CID, CIB mean?
@JanusBahsJacquet Thanks! I've added that information to the answer.