11,151 reputation
41957
bio website zanyphoto.com
location San Jose, CA
age 42
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen 16 hours ago

Software engineer, photographer, musician, and gamer.


May
5
comment What does “Lose the whiny entitled air” mean after the sentence “Say, ‘could you warm the soup up,’ Not, ‘How dare you serve me cold soup!’”?
When you use lose in the imperative, it takes the meaning get rid of (deliberately lose).
May
5
comment Word for item or concept which has permanence?
In software, the usual term is persistent object, although that often implies serialization to disk. I don't know of a single-word noun equivalent.
May
5
comment Correct usage of lbs. as in “pounds” of weight
@Marko The questioner asks about “American English,” not scientific literature, which is why I have reservations about this answer. Metric usage is far from universal here.
May
3
comment Word for item or concept which has permanence?
Any particular reason to name these as a class instead of just using an adjective? “Many of the objects we interact with in real life are permanent. If you leave them for a while, they will still exist when you come back. But some things, like an ice cube, are ephemeral.”
May
3
comment Must a coordinating clause always have a subject?
I find the second deletion awkward (“You should wear ... and be punctual”), perhaps because of the incomplete parallelism, perhaps because “to the interview” is in an awkward place in the sentence. Shorter variants seem OK (“You should wear a suit and tie and be punctual”).
May
3
revised Correct usage of lbs. as in “pounds” of weight
Never pluralize metric system units.
May
3
comment Correct usage of lbs. as in “pounds” of weight
@AndrewLeach Plural abbreviations are rare even in English units: lbs is one of the few exceptions. Thanks for the suggestion, I updated the answer.
May
3
comment Correct usage of lbs. as in “pounds” of weight
2.3 kg is not appropriate for general use in American English, and 2.3 Kg (with capital K) is incorrect everywhere. Helpful Ngram though, thanks!
May
3
answered Correct usage of lbs. as in “pounds” of weight
May
3
comment Correct usage of lbs. as in “pounds” of weight
Agreed that 5 lb is correct for scientific usage, but 5 lbs. is common in general English, and some style guides require the period. Please don't recommend “never” for general use without evidence from a general English style guide.
May
3
comment Is the sequence of tenses applied properly in this example?
@FumbleFingers Interesting! That's quite a disparity, although I suspect part of it is simply because it doesn't fit well into conventional narrative writing.
May
3
comment Why are prepositions out of place with many phrasal verbs?
Out of curiosity, is etymology the right word for grammatical history as well as lexical history? I get what the questioner means, I just don't usually usually hear the word used in that context.
May
3
revised Why are prepositions out of place with many phrasal verbs?
Improved formatting, dialog.
May
3
suggested suggested edit on Why are prepositions out of place with many phrasal verbs?
May
2
comment Punctuation around abbreviations
A sentence-ending ellipsis doesn't (necessarily) follow the same rules as a sentence-ending abbreviation. They usually have four dots regardless.
May
2
comment Is the sequence of tenses applied properly in this example?
@FumbleFingers I don't see a problem with “I asked her why she has been rude.” Contrast: “I asked her why she had been rude previously,” with “I asked her why she has been rude lately.” What do you see as the problem with the latter?
May
1
revised Where does the “I brake for” idiom come from?
Fixed "brake" spelling
May
1
answered Which one is more appropriate to use: “send you” or “send to you”?
May
1
suggested suggested edit on Where does the “I brake for” idiom come from?
May
1
comment What part of speech is “that” in each of the following sentences that mean the same?
Without punctuation, the first example not only sounds awkward, but it doesn't suggest the same meaning to me: I read “that I can be sure about” as an awkward variant of “as far as I'm aware.”