Reputation
Top tag
Next privilege 15,000 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
4 21 58
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~680k people reached

Jun
16
comment Word for going to a university class but without being enrolled?
There’s also a common practice of showing up to a full class in hopes of getting an “add” so that you can fully enroll. I am not aware of a word for that particular situation, though.
Apr
25
comment “This box of matches is empty”
Of indicates the genitive case, which includes many relationships, including composition and compounds. Dictionaries don’t get into that kind of subtlety, usage and style guides do.
Apr
25
comment “This box of matches is empty”
@EdwinAshworth This is probably something that varies by dialect. See the discussion under the question itself. Some native speakers find it weird, while others seem to prefer it. I don’t think any native speaker would find it incomprehensible; do you? It’s definitely not a grammatical error, as the syntax is fine.
Apr
24
comment “This box of matches is empty”
@EdwinAshworth “Empty bottle of milk” is fine. Just “bottle of milk” alone is likely to lead down the garden path unless the context makes it obvious that it’s an empty milk bottle.
Apr
19
awarded  Yearling
Feb
22
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
16
comment Who originated “Merry Christmas”?
possible duplicate of Why is it “Merry” Christmas, but “Happy” New Year?
Dec
3
comment What is the English synonym for the German word “Sparmeister”?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about “Translation and non-English languages”.
Nov
24
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
10
comment Why was Tokyo sometimes called “Tokio”?
It's implied, but for folks who don't already know Japanese it's easy to misunderstand the difference between Japanese kyo-o and English ki-yo. Not sure how important that is, just thought you might want to be more explicit in comparing the two.
Nov
10
comment Why was Tokyo sometimes called “Tokio”?
One subtlety that's easy to overlook here is that not only does Tokyo have more "syllables" in Japanese, they're also split up differently. The Japanese is roughly To-oh-kyo-oh, rather than the Toh-ki-oh common in English.
Oct
16
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
6
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
9
comment Why is it that Frisian is considered the closest related language to English?
@JanusBahsJacquet I replaced the bogus factoid with some stuff that is hopefully more accurate!
Sep
9
revised Why is it that Frisian is considered the closest related language to English?
Replace bogus factoid with a better one
Sep
9
revised Why is it that Frisian is considered the closest related language to English?
Add another missing attribution
Sep
9
revised Why is it that Frisian is considered the closest related language to English?
Added author’s name to attribution
Sep
9
revised What is accidental metaplasm & metathesis across words?
Called out linked source in text, expanded answer
Sep
9
revised Which is the older sense of the word “linguist”?
Called out source in text