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comment “At least one” - singular or plural subject?
@SethJeffery It’s or that makes the difference, not either. When nouns linked by or differ in number, the nearest-noun rule applies.
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comment Word for going to a university class but without being enrolled?
There’s also a common practice of showing up to a full class in hopes of getting an “add” so that you can fully enroll. I am not aware of a word for that particular situation, though.
Apr
25
comment “This box of matches is empty”
Of indicates the genitive case, which includes many relationships, including composition and compounds. Dictionaries don’t get into that kind of subtlety, usage and style guides do.
Apr
25
comment “This box of matches is empty”
@EdwinAshworth This is probably something that varies by dialect. See the discussion under the question itself. Some native speakers find it weird, while others seem to prefer it. I don’t think any native speaker would find it incomprehensible; do you? It’s definitely not a grammatical error, as the syntax is fine.
Apr
24
comment “This box of matches is empty”
@EdwinAshworth “Empty bottle of milk” is fine. Just “bottle of milk” alone is likely to lead down the garden path unless the context makes it obvious that it’s an empty milk bottle.
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Dec
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comment Who originated “Merry Christmas”?
possible duplicate of Why is it “Merry” Christmas, but “Happy” New Year?