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awarded  Popular Question
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comment How to parse the parts of a recipe ingredient?
@MattHuggins This question is a cross post, which is against the rules of the Stack Exchange network. I'm flagging it for closing here, because generally, when you are doing requirements engineering, you go to the domain expert. Even when you are doing information architecture, you go to a domain expert and not a language expert. I think you might already have noticed that, you got answers quickly on cooking, but not here.
Oct
18
revised What do you call unclean water that you can't see through?
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Oct
18
awarded  Excavator
Oct
18
revised Where were “should”, “shall”, and “must” in the 18th Century?
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Oct
18
suggested suggested edit on What do you call unclean water that you can't see through?
Oct
18
revised How do the tenses and aspects in English correspond temporally to one another?
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Oct
18
suggested suggested edit on Where were “should”, “shall”, and “must” in the 18th Century?
Sep
29
comment Is there any “swearword” in English not associated with excrements, the genitals, sexual activity or religion?
There are an awful lot of them which refer to the alleged mental capacity of the addressed person.
Sep
29
comment Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back?
I disagree with the variant interpretation. "Leech" and "leecher" are two different words, and in their original context, none can be substituted for the other. Each of them creates completely different associations in the one who hears them (at least if the person has heard "leecher" before in a network context). It is like the Italian-italic case discussed recently: one came from the other, but the meaning has deviated a lot.
Sep
29
comment Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back?
@Geobits what you linked is "leech", as in the animal. Not "leecher", which is a different word, the opposite of "seeder". I can imagine it being derived from the animal, but it's still not the same.
Sep
27
answered Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back?
Sep
8
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
28
comment Appropriate word for internet name of a person
I don't think "username" is good here. It presumes a relationship to a specific program of which the person is a user. So John Doe's username can be "j.doe" in gmail, "doe" in his company intranet, and "JohnnyD_1980" in Skype. It doesn't denote a consistent online identity the way "handle" does, it just frequently happens that the users choose their favorite handle as a username in many programms if not constrained.
Jul
10
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
16
awarded  Caucus
Apr
28
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
19
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Apr
19
comment Single word for shopping after comparing price and features across multiple shops and product types
In marketing (and other places where people are studied making buying or usage choices, such as usability studies or positive psychology), there are two types of buyers. The ones are satisficers (they get the first option which is good enough for them) and the others are maximizers (they do the comparison process you described). I don't remember a term which denotes the process itself, but "a maximizer's buying process" will be understood by people who know the theory. It isn't widespread outside of research circles though.