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Mar
26
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
15
comment Are there any “fake” French words used in English?
You are asking for something which has a name: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_friend. Searching for this should find some good examples (although you probably will have to manually sort for those in the correct direction)
Dec
11
awarded  Organizer
Dec
11
comment How does capitalizing helps readers?
I am aware of the migration history of the question. The problem is that "is it readable" is a completely different question from "why is it used". The second is on topic here, the first back on UX, but none is on topic on both. I made an edit which left the "why" part. Student, you can ask again the other part on UX, this wouldn't be cross posting because it would be a separate question. You'll have to focus on "are there studies comparing the readability" without asking why it has become a standard (which, as a history of language, has nothing to do with UX).
Dec
11
revised How does capitalizing helps readers?
removed the part on readability which is off topic
Dec
11
suggested approved edit on How does capitalizing helps readers?
Oct
7
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
20
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
4
awarded  Famous Question
May
11
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
27
awarded  Yearling
Jan
8
comment Is the “female” in “female cousin” redundant here?
@AE OK, sorry, I mistakenly assumed that Tilak is literally translating it from another language, not giving an example from an English dialect I have not been exposed to. I'm removing my downvote.
Jan
7
comment Is “despite” outdated?
Did your fried offer an explanation of what he thinks is used instead of "despite" nowadays? It's my observation that people behaving contrary is not on the decline, and it's hard to imagine a word so well suited to the state of being contrary being dropped, unless its place is taken up by a more modern synonym.
Jan
5
comment What is the origin of the shift of meaning of “sauté”?
@DavidHammen your recipe describes the original meaning of sautéing, although "medium hot" is ambiguous, they wouldn't burn at what I normally consider "medium hot". But in many recipes, the onions should be put on a heat so low that they won't burn, and then left undisturbed for quite a long time (at least 10 minutes if you want them light). This is not "sauté" in its original meaning, but it is how many people do it (in fact, heat high enough to require constant stirring will burn the coating right off the PTFE pans they are using), and they still call it sauté.
Jan
5
comment What is the origin of the shift of meaning of “sauté”?
@barmar of course they are both forms of frying, but they have different results and are therefore used in different circumstances. It is comparable to the relation of "paint the wall" and "spray grafitti on the wall". Imagine that you start reading DIY books which say "1. Erect the drywall, 2. Prime the surface, 3. Paint grafitti on the wall" in an article explaining how to make a wall with even coloring, and lists "dispersion paint and roller" as the materials needed.
Jan
5
comment What is the origin of the shift of meaning of “sauté”?
@barmar feel free to edit my text for proper usage of linguistic terms. I have only ever learned the "same word, different meaning" definition of "homonym" without hearing the "unrelated" part mentioned - maybe this is a parallel case where the commonly known meaning of "homonym" is different between laypeople and professional linguists.
Jan
5
asked What is the origin of the shift of meaning of “sauté”?
Jan
5
comment Other ways to say 'I plead insanity'
"Pleading insanity" is a legal concept. If the character tries to clothe it in different words, it might well not fit the criteria of the court, and therefore not be an actual insanity plea with all the legal consequences it should have.
Dec
26
answered Best word for a task or deed completed without or before one realizes he/she has even endeavored to do it?
Dec
16
comment What did “eating 'mad cow'” mean in the 1800's?
@fumblefingers I have also seen "mad [animal]" used as a synonym of "[animal] having rabies", most prominently in "To kill a mockingbird" (where the animal in question is a dog). Although I'm not sure that a cow can catch rabies, or if yes, if it's common enough to give rise to such an expression.