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  • 32 votes cast
Jul
27
answered Looking for a word like “eulogy”, but for a person that has not died?
Jan
27
awarded  Yearling
Jun
11
awarded  Caucus
Jan
27
awarded  Yearling
Jul
19
comment Are there counterpart English expressions to Japanese proverb, "the nail that pops up is always hammered down?
I routinely address people as "sir" or "ma'am", regardless of our relative social or professional positions, and of whether I know their names or not. It was the accepted and expected form of politeness at home and at school (Northeastern United States and American private boarding variety in the late 1960s, early 1970s, respectively).
Jun
14
comment Why is “bloody” considered obscene in the UK but not in the US?
@Hugo: Hence my original answer ends with a disclaimer.
May
16
comment Which is correct? If I was or If I were for this particular sentence
You may count me among the dying as well. As Mr. Jagger sings: "I cannot obtain any satisfaction".
Feb
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
27
awarded  Yearling
Oct
23
comment Word for small junk items in household
I thought flotsam was the stuff still floating, and jetsam was the stuff that had actually washed up.
Jul
16
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
27
awarded  Yearling
Oct
28
comment Meaning and origin of “eat your heart out”
You're not eating your heart out; you're addressing Fred Astaire and saying that he should be eating his heart out (i.e. be jealous of the nameless dancer's superior dancing).
Aug
11
comment Meaning of “suits trading airport stories”
"Trading airport stories" also reminds me of "trading war stories", i.e. specifically stories about hardship in a shared context.
Jul
20
comment What does “P.U.” (in reference to stinkiness) stand for?
It stands for my (first and last) initials, and is the reason I insist on using my middle initial. Grade school was tough...
Jul
14
comment Is there a term I can use for a boss's favorite employee?
Similar to "golden", I've seen "fair-haired" boy/girl used for one who can do no wrong (regardless of actual hair color).
Jul
6
answered Better than premium
Jul
6
comment What is an expression for something you particularly like?
@JAB: speaking solely for myself, knaves.
Jul
6
comment A term for adoption of a made up term
@Joe Blow: the tempting answer is, of course, english.stackexchange.com
Jul
5
answered A term for adoption of a made up term