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Jan
28
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
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awarded  Popular Question
Jun
8
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
2
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
29
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
27
awarded  Yearling
Sep
11
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Sep
11
comment Change from to-day to today
Thanks, that's a very nice comparison.
Sep
11
accepted Change from to-day to today
Sep
10
asked Change from to-day to today
Apr
27
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
27
awarded  Yearling
Oct
19
comment Pronunciation of “Wales” and “whales” in Scotland
@Marcin Thanks, that's interesting. So you don't discern the difference in Craig's pronunciation in the video ... interesting. Of course I can't distinguish R and L as a Japanese, so it's not surprising to me in some sense, but W and WH are very easy to distinguish to the Japanese ear.
Oct
19
comment Pronunciation of “Wales” and “whales” in Scotland
@Marcin: "wh", when distinguished from "w", has pronunciation written by [hw] by the international phonetic alphabet. It's written with "hw" in the Old English, as the link en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_history_of_wh cited above says.
Sep
28
accepted Plurality of “genitals”
Sep
27
asked Plurality of “genitals”
Jun
25
comment Pronunciation of “Wales” and “whales” in Scotland
Thanks for the nice answer. So apparently, people in the region where wine and whine merged can still distinguish the sound, right? In Japan the sounds R and L are taken to be the same, and very few can distinguish them. But judging from the laugh of the audience, people in the US still can distinguish W and WH.
Jun
25
accepted Pronunciation of “Wales” and “whales” in Scotland
Jun
25
asked Pronunciation of “Wales” and “whales” in Scotland