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2d
comment Correct pronunciation of either?
Most people stick to one, but I have heard people switch and people who pronounce "either" and "neither" differently, and people who use one pronunciation for "either way" and the other for "either this or that".
2d
answered Correct pronunciation of either?
Jul
18
comment Why is it “have someone wrapped around your LITTLE finger”?
Howard: "You can't tell a falcon when to hunt." Leonard: "Yes, you can. There's a whole sport around it. It's called 'falconry'."
Jul
17
comment Is there a word for using a word twice to imply something different?
Ask Dr. Goldberg.
Jul
17
comment Is there a word for using a word twice to imply something different?
@JanusBahsJacquet -- are you making a very subtle joke? (There is this.)
Jul
17
answered Help me identify the structure of this excerpt
Jul
17
comment Should there be a comma after this adverbial phrase?
My personal rule is that an introductory phrase of more than three words gets a comma; fewer than three words, no comma; exactly three words, judgement call. The example sentence justifies the rule: the comma makes it much easier to parse.
Jul
17
comment What does “at south of $100 million” mean?
@DavidSchwartz -- I'm with you. I hear "north of" used all the time; I'm not sure I have ever heard "south of" before.
Jul
16
awarded  single-word-requests
Jul
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
14
answered A critical situation in which no trick works?
Jul
14
comment Why are female wizards called “witches”?
@Barmar -- would you call someone a financial witch? A financial conjuror? Maybe, but the first would be a negative reflection on his personality; the second would imply, I think, that his results are illusory.
Jul
14
answered “to amend” vs “to make amends”
Jul
13
comment Are there English equivalents to a Japanese old saying, “Be the mouth of cock rather than remaining as the tail of ox”?
@Kevin -- yeah, each of them is reversible, but the third one is more often heard that way, dunno why.
Jul
12
awarded  Generalist
Jul
11
comment Are there English equivalents to a Japanese old saying, “Be the mouth of cock rather than remaining as the tail of ox”?
It is often accomplished by the obvious illustration.
Jul
11
answered Are there English equivalents to a Japanese old saying, “Be the mouth of cock rather than remaining as the tail of ox”?
Jul
11
comment What do you call it when the video is not smooth?
@PhilPerry -- at some point, all these ridiculous standards-mismatches will be resolved: we'll all use the same voltages, the same USB plugs, the same frame-rates, the same side of the street. Of course, by then, my Velstar™-format teleporter won't work with your Modscan™ teleporter, and I'll need to upgrade my cerebro-interface so I can connect to the cortex matrix at work...
Jul
10
comment What does “running a gauntlet of fire” mean?
I think there is an implication in your answer that gauntlet is a word with two meanings. No, it is a pair of separate words that happened to evolve to identical spellings. See my response.
Jul
10
comment What does “running a gauntlet of fire” mean?
In the OP's quote, it wasn't a punishment, it was an actual battle; "gauntlet" was used metaphorically. In a real gauntlet, attacks were limited to punches and kicks, with the occasional handful of thrown sand or hot ashes for variety's sake. Sometimes it was a hazing or initiation ritual, as here.