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Aug
20
comment Difference between distinctness and distinction
"Isn't a great word" is litotes for "is a bad word". Technically, technically, you can make almost any adjective into a noun by adding "-ness" but some words work better than others. "Happiness", perfect; "purpleness", terrible. I would avoid distinctness and would prefer distinctiveness (which means "quality of being very different", in a positive way). And I think you are "confused", because the subject matter is "confusing".
Aug
19
comment Difference between distinctness and distinction
How about this: distinctness is the assertion that at least one distinction exists.
Aug
19
answered How do you capitalize and hyphenate “at a glance” in a title?
Aug
19
answered Difference between distinctness and distinction
Aug
17
answered What does “f***ing pay” mean?
Aug
13
comment “Cheat legal” - grammatically correct?
@EdwinAshworth -- yeah, I don't like "punchy". In some of those examples, it can be argued (more or less convincingly), the adjective describes some elided noun: "Think tour big [plans]" (since "thinking big-ly" doesn't make any sense). "Work smarter", wrong though it may be, is probably preferable to "Work in a smarter fashion" (what else would you say, "Work more smarterly"?) "Think different" was the worst Apple idea until Apple Maps for iOS.
Aug
13
answered “Cheat legal” - grammatically correct?
Aug
12
answered Is it possible to say so very and very so?
Aug
12
comment “Big black eyes” vs. “big and black eyes”
If the sentence omits both the and and the comma, the listener will interpret the adjectives as "cumulative" rather than "coordinate". "Big, black eyes" are eyes that are big and black; "big black eyes" are black eyes (i.e., periorbital hematomae, the injury) that are big. Pretty Russian girls are said to have big, black eyes; unsuccessful boxers have big black eyes.
Aug
11
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
11
revised Etymology of “fixing to”
Corrected some typos in the quote and in the title of the book
Aug
11
answered Word for books of sarcastic type
Aug
11
comment Can we use “bad” as an adverb in writing and formal speech?
"He smells badly" means his nose does a poor job of distinguishing odors. If you mean he exudes an offensive scent, you should write, "He smells bad."
Aug
10
comment “Big black eyes” vs. “big and black eyes”
@medica -- you can disagree, but I'm right :) An "Italian silk hat" would be a silk hat that came from Italy. An "Italian-silk hat" would be a hat made of silk that came from Italy.
Aug
10
comment what is the meaning of “the family dynamic” and “Textbook Case”?
Sorry, typos. Fixed now.
Aug
10
revised what is the meaning of “the family dynamic” and “Textbook Case”?
edited body
Aug
10
comment “Big black eyes” vs. “big and black eyes”
Ah, I remember that hat. Ridiculous, it had the convenience of a top hat, while offering the protection of a yarmulke. And since Italian modifies silk, you need the hyphen: "Italian-silk pill-box hat".
Aug
10
revised “Big black eyes” vs. “big and black eyes”
added 1358 characters in body
Aug
10
answered “Big black eyes” vs. “big and black eyes”
Aug
10
comment “Big black eyes” vs. “big and black eyes”
Not relevant to your question, but be careful when saying "black eyes". It can mean that the irises are are black (parallel to "blue eyes" or "green eyes"), but is more likely to be understood as meaning that the area around the eye is badly bruised (technically a periorbital hematoma), typically from a beating.