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comment i'd like to know some expression used at a photocopy shop
"Ross it!" (Obscure?)
Jul
27
comment Looking for a word like “eulogy”, but for a person that has not died?
Let me assure you, not easily confused with meconium.
Jul
27
comment using an apostrophe
should it not be "our and our parents' generations" -- no comma and plural generations, since by definition we and our parents cannot share a generation?
Jul
27
answered Where does the phrase “flag it” come from
Jul
21
comment A was replaced by B. A was replaced. B was ____?
I like supplant. Supersede means that something is officially designated to supplant something else. When the replacement actually occurs, that is "supplanting".
Jul
21
revised Why has the use of “plague” in OED (sense 2a), as a verb declined?
edited body
Jul
20
answered Why has the use of “plague” in OED (sense 2a), as a verb declined?
Jul
20
revised Why has the use of “plague” in OED (sense 2a), as a verb declined?
added 9 characters in body
Jul
20
revised Why has the use of “plague” in OED (sense 2a), as a verb declined?
added 9 characters in body
Jul
20
revised What does “to come undone” actually mean?
edited body
Jul
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
17
comment If Americans go to the toilet in the bathroom, where do they take a bath?
How exactly is toilet (meaning "to wash oneself") "vulgar" while bathroom is a euphemism?
Jul
9
comment Does the word “house” include the land that surrounds it?
@choster -- you are certainly correct, curtilage is rarely used, but I would like to change that. It is a perfectly cromulent word. In particular, it fills a semantic need.
Jul
9
answered Does the word “house” include the land that surrounds it?
Jun
22
comment Why does “written” become the past participle in this sentence?
@pazzo -- using past rather than present-perfect suggest that the important thing was that it was written, not that it currently exists.
Jun
22
revised Why does “written” become the past participle in this sentence?
added 30 characters in body
Jun
22
comment Origin of “Hype”
I have never heard "hype" as an intransitive verb. That use must come from "hyperactive".
Jun
22
comment Origin of “Hype”
I cannot think of any use for "hype" that does not sound like a shortening of hyperbole, except for the occasional use to mean "drug addict", from "hypodermic syringe".
Jun
22
answered Why does “written” become the past participle in this sentence?
Jun
18
comment Is there a single word meaning “good night vision”
Incidentally, in this context "photosensitivity" means that your skin, not your eyes, is particularly sensitive to light.