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revised Is the term “city boy” a commonly used appellation for London bankers? Does it only apply to them, or is it colloquial for other London denizens?
added 13 characters in body
May
16
comment What is the English version of the Vietnamese idiom “như cá nằm trên thớt” - “like a fish on cutting board”
The proverbial cornered rat will resort to extreme tactics, such as attacking a much larger animal. The phrase is meant to warn the attacker about his desperate adversary.
May
16
answered What is the English version of the Vietnamese idiom “như cá nằm trên thớt” - “like a fish on cutting board”
May
16
answered What does Mitt Romney’s “yams” mean?
May
15
comment Is “over-babble” a common word usable in day-to-day conversation?
I think that the idea that a politician ought to be babbling at some level, while perfectly plausible, would be controversial enough that you shouldn't bury it in the construction of a nonce word. "At a private gathering, he babbled far beyond even the high level expected of a Republican politician." My point -- and I do have one -- is not that you are wrong, but that a writer who confuses even people who are reading closely should not be casting the first stone about "babbling".
May
15
comment Is “over-babble” a common word usable in day-to-day conversation?
@FumbleFingers - If you are certain, the writer can make herself clear, I have to ask: what was she trying to say?
May
15
answered Is “over-babble” a common word usable in day-to-day conversation?
May
15
comment I got confused with past participles usage so please explain the following example to me
You need to explain what "explain the following example" means. And you might want to post to English Language Learners instead.
May
11
comment From the “Baghdad bounce” to the “dead-cat bounce”
The idea of throwing dead cats (along with tomatoes and other debris) is unconnected with "dead-cat bounce", which comes from a financial aphorism, "Even a dead cat will bounce if you drop it from high enough", which referred to any slight and temporary recovery after a long decline.
May
11
comment Suffix order: -lessness vs -nessless
@PeterShor -- how far can this be recursed? Can a case be dismissed on the grounds of witnesslessnesss? If a lawyer never suffers such a dismissal, is he witnesslessnesssless?
May
4
answered Can something be “vapid of” something?
Apr
30
comment Is there an idiom to describe someone who grew from less than average to influential?
It is certainly a myth at characters in Horatio Alger stories became vastly wealthy. They typically became genteelly prosperous. In real life, many Americans have risen from financially humble beginnings to wealth.
Apr
30
answered Can I end a sentence with the word “to”?
Apr
28
comment Correct preposition with “to be jealous”
Yeah, a lot of people say that about the Bible. "My friend Weird Howard tells me he got a new job. He is selling Bibles. I say, 'Weird Howard, Bibles are free.' He says, 'These are custom Bibles. For $20 extra, I'll take out any two Commandments.' So now I can commit adultery on Sundays."
Apr
28
answered Correct preposition with “to be jealous”
Apr
28
answered Use of the word 'inured'
Apr
25
revised What is the students' jargon or abbreviation for assignments made up of “only” data downloaded from the internet in English? (If it exists)
added 261 characters in body
Apr
23
answered Does a pun require an explicit reference to the word being punned?
Apr
23
comment Listen to it rain and look at it snow
Yup, "Watch it snow" and "Watch it snowing" are equivalent and equally acceptable sentences. Strange, though, that you can say, "it is snowing", but not "it is snow" (that would mean that thing over there, the pile of white stuff, is snow).
Apr
23
answered Listen to it rain and look at it snow