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16h
revised What is the students' jargon or abbreviation for assignments made up of “only” data downloaded from the internet in English? (If it exists)
added 261 characters in body
2d
answered Does a pun require an explicit reference to the word being punned?
2d
comment Listen to it rain and look at it snow
Yup, "Watch it snow" and "Watch it snowing" are equivalent and equally acceptable sentences. Strange, though, that you can say, "it is snowing", but not "it is snow" (that would mean that thing over there, the pile of white stuff, is snow).
2d
answered Listen to it rain and look at it snow
2d
comment “Wise man” vs. “wise guy”
You are not the first to ask this question.
Apr
18
answered How can I fix this paragraph's grammar and punctuation?
Apr
16
comment What is a word for “detaining without trial”?
Given that the Wikipedia page on the subject refers to strictly as "detention without trial", I am going to say there is no shorter phrase in common use.
Apr
15
comment When did “More tea vicar?” start to be used after farting? Where did it come from?
I have never heard the expression either, despite having changed planes at Heathrow on several occasions, but now that I have heard it, I plan to employ it whenever I can.
Apr
15
comment In what (semantic) context might “REFUSE” be used with a gerund complement?
@FumbleFingers -- yes, that was my point. Sorry if I did not make that clear. It is grammatically correct: you can refuse a noun just like you can reject a noun, it just sounds funny because semantically, we don't tend to "refuse" gerunds. Refusing a noun means you decline to accept it and there aren't many situations where you are offered gerunds. More abstract verbs like reject, enjoy, and practice work on a wider scope.
Apr
15
comment In what (semantic) context might “REFUSE” be used with a gerund complement?
@FumbleFingers -- but 140 years later, doesn't it sound like the Nonconformists were somehow offered "bowing" as a service? "Oh, would you like us to bow for you?" "No, thanks, we're Nonconformists."
Apr
15
comment “Made of” vs. “Made with”
I am not saying you are wrong, but I would want to see a few examples where something is made "of" something else and the something else was not (a) one item, (b) all of that item, (c) the only item, and (d) in its final form. To my ear, squeezing up part of a lemon and mixing it with other stuff means you aren't making it "of" lemons.
Apr
15
answered In what (semantic) context might “REFUSE” be used with a gerund complement?
Apr
15
comment “Made of” vs. “Made with”
Fluffernutter is trademarked? This shall not stand!
Apr
15
comment What does this sentence mean: “You watched his face crack open and your world shifted, …”?
All of them understand it to mean that the change in his facial expression revealed his emotions -- which in this case are negative, but people might also use in a positive case, as in "crack a smile". I don't know if the image is "disturbing a previously smooth and unmarked surface" (like a crack in glass or ice) or "breaking a covering and revealing what is underneath" (like a crack in paint), but the final meaning is the same.
Apr
15
comment “Made of” vs. “Made with”
To reuse a comment, lemonade (which is mostly water and sugar) is made with lemons; orange juice (which is solely orange extract) is made from oranges; the pitcher is made of glass (or ceramic or plastic).
Apr
15
comment “Made of” vs. “Made with”
I have to say that to me, this just sounds wrong. You can pick up a hundred boxes in the supermarket marked "made with" something. Made of implies that the following is the sole or primary and in its current form. Lemonade is made with lemons; orange juice is made from oranges; the pitcher is made of glass.
Apr
15
comment What does this sentence mean: “You watched his face crack open and your world shifted, …”?
I think the interpretations given here are correct but I want to emphasize that nothing about this sentence is idiomatic. It's intended (I assume) to be poetic and evocative.
Apr
12
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
10
answered Another way of saying “it doesn't always pay to be right”