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Jun
22
comment Why does “written” become the past participle in this sentence?
@pazzo -- using past rather than present-perfect suggest that the important thing was that it was written, not that it currently exists.
Jun
22
revised Why does “written” become the past participle in this sentence?
added 30 characters in body
Jun
22
comment Origin of “Hype”
I have never heard "hype" as an intransitive verb. That use must come from "hyperactive".
Jun
22
comment Origin of “Hype”
I cannot think of any use for "hype" that does not sound like a shortening of hyperbole, except for the occasional use to mean "drug addict", from "hypodermic syringe".
Jun
22
answered Why does “written” become the past participle in this sentence?
Jun
18
comment Is there a single word meaning “good night vision”
Incidentally, in this context "photosensitivity" means that your skin, not your eyes, is particularly sensitive to light.
Jun
18
answered Is there a single word meaning “good night vision”
Jun
14
comment What is the English version of the Vietnamese idiom “như cá nằm trên thớt” - “like a fish on cutting board”
Rethinking this, I realized that "like a cornered rat", means "liable to resort to extreme measures", but "cornered like a rat" means "in danger and lacking options" (which, of course, will often lead to extreme measures). Both phrases come from the unsavory sport of rat-baiting.
Jun
13
answered Why soothe a savage breast?
Jun
11
answered What do you call someone who substitutes one inappropriate word for a similar word?
Jun
7
comment What is a “lemus”?
I would watch the heck out of a Night Of The Lemmus DVD.
Jun
7
comment What is a “lemus”?
@WhatRoughBeast -- "lemuses" is a typo for lemures ("spirits of the restless or malignant dead").
Jun
7
comment What is a “lemus”?
Ah, you are saying the whole thing might have been a deliberate choice by Wall to generate a new spelling, free of any association with the (somewhat ridiculous) primate? Not impossible, but since the word lemuses is never used again in the book (and the singular lemus does not appear at all), it becomes less likely.
Jun
7
comment What is a “lemus”?
Your theory does require an pretty exact combination of expertise and illiteracy, you need one guy to know that the singular of lemures could be either lemur or lemus, but never heard or Linnaeus, Goethe, or the little monkey-things, and then another guy to see lemus and know what the first guy meant, but not know how to pluralize it. Occam's Razor says: typo.
Jun
7
answered What is a “lemus”?
Jun
6
comment Why do people say “break a leg” to actors?
Aleichem (עֲלֵיכֶם) means "be with you" -- most famously in the expression "Sholom aleichem", peace be with you, or in Arabic, Salaam alaikum. Baruch ( בָּרוּךְ) means "blessing" (most famously in Arabic as the name of a recent US president).
Jun
3
awarded  Popular Question
May
28
comment Is there an English equivalent to the Chinese saying, 君子之交淡如水 …?
Well, what does it mean?
May
28
comment Is there English counterpart to Japanese proverb, 一期一会 , meaning “Cherish once -in -a-lifetime encounter”?
Not to put too fine a point on it, "YOLO" is a popular acronym among native English-speaking morons. Actually, I am not even sure that that is true, because I have never heard it used except in the context of "That guy is so dumb, he says 'YOLO'." The idea (and again, I cannot swear this is true) is that a certain kind of person says "I am going to do this dumb/careless/dangerous/rude/cruel thing because YOLO".
May
27
answered Is there English counterpart to Japanese proverb, 一期一会 , meaning “Cherish once -in -a-lifetime encounter”?