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  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 34 votes cast
Apr
27
comment AM/PM vs a.m./p.m. vs am/pm
I like this as a reasonable explanation. I hadn't thought of the Latin origin, but that does make more sense now. Thanks.
Apr
27
comment AM/PM vs a.m./p.m. vs am/pm
Ah sorry. I did search before posting, but I didn't notice that question.
Apr
26
asked AM/PM vs a.m./p.m. vs am/pm
Apr
4
accepted Why can positive statements end with a negative question and vice versa?
Apr
4
comment Why can positive statements end with a negative question and vice versa?
In the absence of any other answers that really stood out, I'm choosing this as the best answer. Even if it mostly applies to the legal field, it seems to exactly encapsulate what I was asking about.
Mar
31
comment Why can positive statements end with a negative question and vice versa?
Even if "leading question" is formally defined as a legal term, is there a reason why it can't be used more generally?
Mar
31
comment Why can positive statements end with a negative question and vice versa?
Is there a name for this sort of rhetorical device? Or is it too broad to generalize?
Mar
31
awarded  Cleanup
Mar
31
revised Why can positive statements end with a negative question and vice versa?
rolled back to a previous revision
Mar
30
asked Why can positive statements end with a negative question and vice versa?
Mar
30
comment Why is it “The King's Speech” but “Le Discours d'un Roi”?
I still don't believe this question is relevant. It's totally a subjective discussion that only the producer of the movie could settle. "King's Speech," "The Speech of a King," "A King's Speech," and "The King's Speech," for example, all sound just fine to me.
Mar
29
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Mar
29
comment What is it called when a single word is offset by commas?
Would it be inappropriate at all to use this construct in more formal writing?
Mar
29
comment What is a single word describing a person who opposes another, yet is of equal status to them?
Tough call. I think both @kriegar and @Purplegoldfish had good responses. I feel like maybe rival implies opposition whereas counterpart only implies complete equality. I.e., a counterpart might be completely amicable or on your side.
Mar
29
comment What is it called when a single word is offset by commas?
Thanks, both of you, but these interesting discussions. I wasn't aware that parenthesis meant anything other than the notable punctuation mark.
Mar
29
accepted What is it called when a single word is offset by commas?
Mar
29
comment What is it called when a single word is offset by commas?
Are parentheses—the punctuation marks ( and )—considered brackets? If so, is it just coincidence that they share the same word as this term, i.e., a parenthesis marked off by parentheses?
Mar
29
accepted Should sentences like “I wonder…” end with a question mark?
Mar
28
asked What is it called when a single word is offset by commas?
Mar
28
asked Should sentences like “I wonder…” end with a question mark?