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location Logan, UT
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visits member for 1 year, 1 month
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*strong text*I have worked at Utah State University for nearly eighteen years now allowing me access to the Merrill-Cazere Library and its vast collection of books to accomplish my research goals in English and Hebrew. I have also been involved in genealogical research for the past forty years which has given me extensive experience researching records from across the United States and from Werttemberg Germany, in the pursuit of hidden knowledge. I have written two family history books plus two addendums, all published for my family. I am a self-motivator to achieve all tasks assigned to me from others as well as being self imposed.


Apr
10
asked Etymology of the word 'ax'
Apr
9
answered Why does the letter ‘o’ appear in the word ‘people’?
Apr
9
answered Antonym of “exodus”
Apr
7
comment What is the origin of the reference to the “ancient Marks”
@Jim Thank you so much for your discovery in my behalf. Previously I had not read quite that far as yet and so I am appreciative that you did. I believe the noun 'mark' indicates a land boundary controlled by a Germanic community dating from primitive or medieval times. Source: Webster's 3rd New International Dict. 1981. Thus the small nation of 'Den/Dan-mark' seems to fit that definition but in a grander fashion. Any other ideas I would be glad to read of them.
Apr
3
asked What is the origin of the reference to the “ancient Marks”
Apr
3
answered What are people who 'flee' called?
Apr
2
comment What is the meaning of 'life'?
From my own experience I reflect often on a scripture which answers for me the importance of life, namely: "Whereas ye know not what shall shall be on the morrow. For what is your life? It is even a vapour, that appeareth for a little time, then vanisheth away." James 4:14 KJV We are here for a purpose, a probationary time to be tried and tested along our journey. What we learn for both good and ill will affect the eternities ahead. Jesus Christ said it best; "I am the way, the truth and the life, no man cometh unto the Father but by me." John 14:6 Use our time wisely is the watchword here.
Mar
26
answered Does the idiom “in lieu of” for “instead of” sound legalese or affected in modern day AmE
Mar
17
answered Is there a secular, non vulgar alternative to “for heaven's sake”?
Mar
14
comment Who and when did the quotation, “Vulgarity is the efforts of a weak mind to forcibly express itself.” originate from?
@ Duckisaduck... I appreciate your answer and providing the source and time. Very thoughtful of you.
Mar
14
asked Who and when did the quotation, “Vulgarity is the efforts of a weak mind to forcibly express itself.” originate from?
Mar
13
answered What's the deal with “fiery”?
Mar
11
answered Word for a person who loses or has lost faith?
Feb
5
awarded  Commentator
Feb
5
comment Old English Etymology
I found this reference and I thought to add it here: "an, suffix. I. Derivative. 1. repr. L. anus, ana,-anum, of or belonging to. Orig. in M.E. -ain, or (after i ) -en, after OFr., but later refash. -an. Esp. added to proper names; 'belonging to a place', as Oxonian, etc.; 'following a founder', or 'a system', as Lutheran, Anglican..." Source: Shorter Oxford English Dict., Vol. 1, A-M, 1933, Oxford University Press. In understanding Modern English the word 'bring' is regarded now as a verb. But was it always thus?
Feb
5
comment Old English Etymology
Source: A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary by John Clark Hall, 1916, page 176. On the internet
Feb
5
asked Old English Etymology
Jan
16
comment Why and when did the practice of successive punctuation marks such as periods (…) originate in English sentence structure?
@JohnLawler- Ok, a play on words then. How would you ask the question?
Jan
15
comment Origin of “-ing”
@matt- The question asks what is the origin of the suffix "ing". The sources speak for themselves to link the suffix to a noun originally and evolving out from there in varied applications.
Jan
15
asked Why and when did the practice of successive punctuation marks such as periods (…) originate in English sentence structure?