128 reputation
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location Logan, UT
age
visits member for 1 year, 8 months
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*strong text*I have worked at Utah State University for nearly eighteen years now allowing me access to the Merrill-Cazere Library and its vast collection of books to accomplish my research goals in English and Hebrew. I have also been involved in genealogical research for the past forty years which has given me extensive experience researching records from across the United States and from Werttemberg Germany, in the pursuit of hidden knowledge. I have written two family history books plus two addendums, all published for my family. I am a self-motivator to achieve all tasks assigned to me from others as well as being self imposed.


2d
answered Arrogancy vs. Humility
Nov
21
comment Arrogancy vs. Humility
@Drew- The word 'arrogancy' can be found in the 1947 edition of Webster's New International English Dictionary. I looked it up this morning to make sure. Why it's not included in the English SE's data base isn't known. Thanks for your input.
Nov
21
comment Arrogancy vs. Humility
Is there a good source depicting the above scenario and emphasizing the reaction shown forth by those demonstrating arrogance to a single person who defends the truth?
Nov
20
asked Arrogancy vs. Humility
Nov
19
answered Is there a word or phrase for someone who works hard at night and does not sleep?
Nov
19
answered What is a word that means unforgettable but with a negative connotation?
Nov
19
answered Adjective that means “snake-like”
Nov
19
comment Oil is slippery; rubber is _____?
@JoeZ.- I like your answer. Seems to be much more original and descriptive than the other answers I have read. Certainly worthy of a higher score and so I add my own.
Nov
13
comment Is there English proverb or saying equivalent to Chinese / Japanese common proverb 李下に冠を正さず- Don’t touch (redress) your coronet under the plum tree?
This question is terminally unclear. Shouldn't the question be put on hold until it is optimally written for everyone to understand? From my point of view it appears to be slanted towards Japanese when this is an English website. Perhaps the originator would have greater success at Linguistics SE.
Nov
12
comment Is there a slang word or phrase for someone who is always playing dirty tricks or unpleasant practical jokes on his friends and acquaintances?
Very poor quality in terms of slang. Its really dirty street talk as spoken by gutter snipes(My Fair Lady). Should have no place in the vocabulary of intelligent people.
Nov
12
comment Is there a slang word or phrase for someone who is always playing dirty tricks or unpleasant practical jokes on his friends and acquaintances?
Your word doesn't sound common at all to the colloquial English tongue.
Nov
12
answered Is there a slang word or phrase for someone who is always playing dirty tricks or unpleasant practical jokes on his friends and acquaintances?
Nov
4
answered Word for an Original Idea
Oct
22
comment Secular phrase for “Heaven only knows” or “God only knows”?
Isn't fate a philosophy of men rather than a religious concept?
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
11
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma- Surd= voiceless sound; sonant= voiced sound; please provide a couple of examples from Old English words bearing the letter 'S' for me. I need your expertise in phonetics here.
Jul
10
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma- Can you tell me how the letter 'S' appears as a /surd/ or a /sonant/ while providing a couple of examples in Old English words. Thank you
Jul
10
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma- Can you produce a tenth century document wherein the author specifically mentions the term 'reflexive pronoun'? I agree that in modern terminology all words are designated by category but in ancient times did they use the same terms we use today? That's what I was referring to and should have been more specific. Concerning the 's' & 'z' question I am reading an older book wherein the author(a scholar from Yale) declared that the 'z' in Old English sounds like 'ts'. This is very confusing as I remember your own declaration earlier. 'ts or tz' can be associated with Hebrew also.
Jul
9
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma- I have no desire to argue either. I was only going by what you said earlier as I chose to trust scholars of Modern English. I study the past and so reflexive pronouns didn't even exist in the 10th century. That is strictly a modern English term and I am trying to learn about language as it was understood centuries ago in its simplicity. To my knowledge from history Old English was later called Anglo-Saxon because of political expediency. I suggest you read from the 1947 Websters International English Dictionary in its opening pages before the Socialist agenda took hold in America.
Jul
8
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
To Whom it may concern, Its been several days since I last checked this site and frankly I was shocked that the powers to be edited out most of my final comment. I photocopied this entire site several days ago and I know what I said. I question now the motives behind the editing which to me is lacking in integrity. I expected more from scholars than that.