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location Logan, UT
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visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Oct 14 at 20:12

*strong text*I have worked at Utah State University for nearly eighteen years now allowing me access to the Merrill-Cazere Library and its vast collection of books to accomplish my research goals in English and Hebrew. I have also been involved in genealogical research for the past forty years which has given me extensive experience researching records from across the United States and from Werttemberg Germany, in the pursuit of hidden knowledge. I have written two family history books plus two addendums, all published for my family. I am a self-motivator to achieve all tasks assigned to me from others as well as being self imposed.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
11
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma- Surd= voiceless sound; sonant= voiced sound; please provide a couple of examples from Old English words bearing the letter 'S' for me. I need your expertise in phonetics here.
Jul
10
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma- Can you tell me how the letter 'S' appears as a /surd/ or a /sonant/ while providing a couple of examples in Old English words. Thank you
Jul
10
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma- Can you produce a tenth century document wherein the author specifically mentions the term 'reflexive pronoun'? I agree that in modern terminology all words are designated by category but in ancient times did they use the same terms we use today? That's what I was referring to and should have been more specific. Concerning the 's' & 'z' question I am reading an older book wherein the author(a scholar from Yale) declared that the 'z' in Old English sounds like 'ts'. This is very confusing as I remember your own declaration earlier. 'ts or tz' can be associated with Hebrew also.
Jul
9
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma- I have no desire to argue either. I was only going by what you said earlier as I chose to trust scholars of Modern English. I study the past and so reflexive pronouns didn't even exist in the 10th century. That is strictly a modern English term and I am trying to learn about language as it was understood centuries ago in its simplicity. To my knowledge from history Old English was later called Anglo-Saxon because of political expediency. I suggest you read from the 1947 Websters International English Dictionary in its opening pages before the Socialist agenda took hold in America.
Jul
8
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
To Whom it may concern, Its been several days since I last checked this site and frankly I was shocked that the powers to be edited out most of my final comment. I photocopied this entire site several days ago and I know what I said. I question now the motives behind the editing which to me is lacking in integrity. I expected more from scholars than that.
Jun
24
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
Anglo-Saxon: s(z)in, by comparative method, relates to the Semitic zn, znn, znh, zny, or znut in phonetics.
Jun
23
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma- To be learned is good but many times those with extensive educations "can't see the trees for the forest" meaning its possible to be too broad. Linguistic theory can be too broad to see the simple solution. The ancient Germans/Anglo-Saxons came from somewhere and I believe certain parts of there language survived from their roots. What does the academic society believe through their theories is the ancestry of the Germans/Anglo-Saxons? Surely they have studied this.
Jun
20
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma: But the ancient Germans had no written language until after they were Christianized in the 7th century. They were considered nomadic barbarians before by the more advanced nations they came into contact with. What you are saying though is that such Anglo-Saxon words written as: sind, sinder and sindon could have been pronounced as zind, zinder or zindon. If this is true I can see a connection to the Akkadian ZNN, Ugaritic ZN, Aramaic ZNH, ZNY, and Hebrew itself all of which are older languages. Refer to: Book Notes: The Hebrew Harlot- A Guest Review by Carly Crouch on the web.
Jun
20
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma: When did 'z' words first appear in Germanic languages? If they didn't appear until after the 12th century then I am perplexed by the Dutch 'zondigen' as listed in the derivatives from the OED. Does this peculiarity have possibilities as a substratum of language?
Jun
19
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
@Darkgamma: Sunigojan from the OED, vol. XV, p.505. I divided this word up in elements as 'sun/ig/ojan. I found in "A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary" by Hall of 1916 that 'ig'= ic or I, finding no suffix yet of the same spelling. Can you comment also on the list of derivatives to sin in the OED, that among them is listed the Dutch 'zondigen', the Dutch language being also of the West Germanic Group. I ask this because in the A.S. Dictionary there isn't any 'z' words listed & probably not coming into use until after 1100 AD. Does zondigen from Dutch predate the 12th Century?
Jun
19
comment Etymology of the word 'sin'
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
May
5
comment Origin of the noun-forming suffix “-hood”
@StoneyB- Thank you for offering that insight I had not previously considered.
May
2
comment Origin of the noun-forming suffix “-hood”
@StoneyB-Thank you for answering that part of the question. Does this explain later spellings of hod or hud, to read as hode or hude, or is the 'e' added in those references were meant to indicate a different meaning?
May
2
comment Origin of the noun-forming suffix “-hood”
@StoneyB- In answering your puzzlement, I was referring to the translation or derivation as you put it, of Robin Hood itself as 'Robin who wears a hood' or 'Robin of the Wood'. I am interested to know your source and the reason behind those conclusions. All clues help in the final analysis.
May
2
comment Origin of the noun-forming suffix “-hood”
@StoneyB- My source is the 1989 edition of the OED and admittedly I got ahead of myself in reviewing reading about 'rob, robbery, robin, robbin, robing', and the like. A new possibility though arose in my mind I will share with you. As a genealogist of 40 years now, I have learned to ask questions to reach goals of going from the known into the unknown. Its like putting "flesh on the bones", so-to-speak, as we delve into the past. Robin Hood could have been first expressed as "rob-in-hood" back in the 12th century. Could robbers dressed like hooded monks be a possibility to this expression?
May
2
comment Origin of the noun-forming suffix “-hood”
@StoneyB- I rechecked the Anglo-Saxon dictionaries from both Hall & Bosworth-Toller and you were right about 'had', except I noted that instead of a long vowel pronunciation mark over the 'a', there was an accent mark provided which I need more clarity into its correct pronunciation. The word 'hod' also comes with an accent mark over the 'o', perhaps you could explain that as well.
May
1
comment Origin of the noun-forming suffix “-hood”
@Ronan- In Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary of 1916 the A.S. word 'hod' is defined as simply 'A hood' with no mention of any further definition of 'a condition or state of'. Are you referring then to a Middle/Modern English evolution from the O.E.? How do you go from 'A hood' as a noun for a covering to a noun forming suffix indicating a condition or state of being? I guess I am asking for more clarity.
May
1
comment Origin of the noun-forming suffix “-hood”
@StoneyB- According to the OED, vol.14, p.5 [Robin] is also a verbal substantive with variants in robbin and robing relating to thievery, thus I added my own assumption to the many others offered from the past, including the possibility that the name Robin Hood is a pseudonym and purely fictitious. Could you provide the source of your translation?
May
1
asked Origin of the noun-forming suffix “-hood”