249 reputation
14
bio website simonwiles.net
location Stanford, CA
age
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Oct 1 at 4:37

Oct
1
answered Why is it “your Majesty”, but “my Lord”?
Feb
7
comment Provoke in a good way
@TecBrat -- would you hold that sentence from the KJV as an example of good modern English?
Sep
2
comment English word for taking a derogatory term and owning it with pride
@MichaelOwenSartin - I actually think that what Michael Own Sartin wrote was more accurate and appropriate (if not necessarily better as such). "Reclaim" is far preferable to "reappropriate", to my mind (in fact, I'm not even sure that the latter is a real word -- it's not in the OED or Websters').
Aug
30
awarded  Yearling
Aug
30
comment Been watching Masterchef and . .
Actually, fwiw, I think "4 years are required to to finish the degree" is more correct than "4 years is required to to finish the degree." Can you see why?
Aug
30
comment “Er” added to name of sport, to refer to a player
I do it too. I'm British, fwiw. ;)
Aug
30
answered In “that pig is as solid as they come” what does “they come” mean?
Aug
29
awarded  Commentator
Aug
29
revised At least two or more: Not always redundant?
added 1 characters in body
Aug
29
comment At least two or more: Not always redundant?
@SF < 1% – indeed, that’s what I’d hoped to convey!
Aug
29
awarded  Editor
Aug
29
revised At least two or more: Not always redundant?
added 605 characters in body
Aug
29
comment At least two or more: Not always redundant?
if i am defining, say, XML elements, then those that require "at least two or more attributes" is the set of elements that includes those that require two or more elements, those that require three or more elements, those that require four or more elements, and so on. It’s not the same as your example at all.
Aug
29
answered At least two or more: Not always redundant?
Aug
27
comment “Through the course” vs. “over the course”
@TrevorD — fair enough. In an on-screen context I have a preference for the newly-emerging conventions, but perhaps this isn’t the place to be avant-garde. (I’d add an emoticon here, but somehow it seems as though it might come across as disingenuous!)
Aug
27
answered “Through the course” vs. “over the course”
Aug
27
answered “Scheduled to September” vs. “scheduled in September”
Aug
27
answered Why does “lemon” mean “inferior”?
Aug
27
answered Opposite of “client”?
Aug
27
answered Do I need a comma after landscaper?