148 reputation
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bio website jdanielsmith.name
location Whitmore Lake, MI
age 48
visits member for 4 years
seen Dec 31 '14 at 21:23

Slinging code since 1984.


Dec
18
awarded  Critic
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
I believe the courts generally assume that the legislature (or, in this particular instance, a citizen-led constitutional amendment) intentionally wrote the text in a given manner. As you say, it would have been "easy" to add commas.
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
i.e., get it in front of a judge. :-)
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
This reading would be based in part on semantics and not just the syntax, yes? If the sentence was "Red and green and blue and yellow ..." there would be no reason to group "{Red and green} and {blue and yellow} ...". On the other hand, if it was "Black and white and cherry and peach ..." you might want to group the (non-) colors and fruit colors together.
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
@Oldcat so you agree with my bulleted list reading? Each item between the "and"s stands on its own.
Dec
18
awarded  Commentator
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
@Oldcat (or @JeffryKemp) anything more than "I think"? i.e., some reference to grammar rules.
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
@JeffreyKemp and can you write an answer so that I can mark it as correct?
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
@JeffreyKemp OK, thanks. I was hoping to find a way to read "spending may not ..." (i.e., not just "state spending" but any and all spending by government.) Would such a reading be possible given the historical context of this text which was "voter approval for tax increases"?
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
Ok, that looks good. But, given that the comma is not there (and can't be added) are other interpretations reasonable? (Based on grammar, not law.)
Dec
18
comment how should “…; or …” be understood?
My suggestion about repeating "The foregoing limitations" is a way to make the actual meaning more clear, if not redundant and boring to read.
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
This is the first sentence of the only paragraph, any preceding text is in a different section. If you WERE going to add punctuation to support the one of the grouped readings, what might that be?
Dec
18
asked how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
Dec
17
asked how should “…; or …” be understood?
Nov
4
awarded  Scholar
Nov
4
accepted How should a long sentence with multiple “or”s and commas be understood?
Oct
30
comment How should a long sentence with multiple “or”s and commas be understood?
Now, looking at this question from another angle, what would you think of "a" and "b" being separate bullet points, for a total of four? How might you refute or justify that? (Again, grammatically, not legally). [There is a strong desire to make "a" an enumerated activity as "increasing the trade" is quite permissive.]
Oct
30
comment How should a long sentence with multiple “or”s and commas be understood?
@bib: could you edit your answer to include the explanation in your comment? (Also, your "b)" has a stray paren.)
Oct
30
comment How should a long sentence with multiple “or”s and commas be understood?
@bib yes, I'm only trying to make sense of the grammar. I was going to substitute arbitrary or nonsense words, but figured I might as well use the actual text.
Oct
30
revised How should a long sentence with multiple “or”s and commas be understood?
deleted 30 characters in body