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 Yearling
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May
15
awarded  Yearling
May
12
accepted Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
May
8
comment Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
this is getting away from my original question about "and" ... but, now that you've looked at the full text, do you see any way to perform "increase the trade" activities other than by participating in an exhibition?
May
8
comment Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
@Perm when I find myself in that position (and I sometimes do, see ElectDanSmith.com), I try to assume various worse-case scenarios. Maybe a result of writing code for a living?
May
8
comment Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
@Prem or even worse, when such imprecision becomes law, as is the case in my original question.
May
8
comment How should a long sentence with multiple “or”s and commas be understood?
@bib I'm reading this again (and with comments from english.stackexchange.com/a/244954/3955), looking at the actual words, it feels like b) should be a bullet, even if it is inconsistent. collecting, preparing or maintaining an exhibition ... for the purpose of ... advertising the state and any portion thereof for tourists and resorters. doesn't seem to make much sense. If you want to advertise, you do it; you don't have an prepare exhibition to advertise for tourists.
May
8
comment Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
This answer english.stackexchange.com/a/133706/3955 says that the second or does not belong with the first because of parallel construction: "for advertising ..." or "for collecting ...". The third activity would also be "for advertising ... tourists" to be consistent.
May
8
comment Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
The writers are long gone, and different readers want the text to allow different things. (I want very restricted and limited use of the "amount," others not so much.) I was hoping this could be mostly sorted out through just the grammar, but your explanations show that might not be enough.
May
7
comment Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
The example of Most movies I like star Shahrukh AND Kajol is the same as macaroni and cheese -- a few words.
May
7
comment Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
My use of "Boolean logic" probably also makes my vocation obvious. :-)
May
7
comment Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
Point taken about the ambiguity having little to nothing to do with "more words." Your examples show that it's just the nature of human languages.
May
7
revised Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
edited body
May
7
revised Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
added 9 characters in body
May
7
revised Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
added 142 characters in body
May
7
asked Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation?
Jan
31
accepted how should “…; or …” be understood?
Jan
31
accepted how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
Dec
18
awarded  Critic
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
I believe the courts generally assume that the legislature (or, in this particular instance, a citizen-led constitutional amendment) intentionally wrote the text in a given manner. As you say, it would have been "easy" to add commas.
Dec
18
comment how should several “and”s without any punctuation be understood?
i.e., get it in front of a judge. :-)