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seen Oct 25 at 0:42

Feb
3
answered “Go, Yankees!”, “Go, Tigers!”, etc. — go where?
Feb
3
answered Are you well? Happy New Year's Eve!
Feb
3
comment Are you well? Happy New Year's Eve!
These would be best split off into two separate questions.
Feb
1
comment Is the following use of “imperative” good style?
@Robusto: You should make that an actual answer so it can be up-voted. :)
Feb
1
awarded  Commentator
Feb
1
comment Is “from whence” correct? Or should it be “whence”?
It seems you're focusing on the word "incorrect" in my answer. I've changed it to "redundant" per my comment above to indicate the intended meaning of the statement when I wrote it. As to whether it's correct or not to use 'from whence', that's clearly subjective and wasn't meant to be asserted in my answer, hence the second sentence that simply mentions it's a topic of heated debate (which links to an explanation of why it's debated).
Feb
1
revised Is “from whence” correct? Or should it be “whence”?
clarification
Feb
1
comment Is “from whence” correct? Or should it be “whence”?
"Technically incorrect" refers to the redundancy. Saying "from from where" is technically incorrect. The fact that it has entered common usage and acceptance doesn't change the fact that it's technically redundant.
Feb
1
answered Is “from whence” correct? Or should it be “whence”?
Feb
1
answered Curriculum vitae: Proper qualifiers for skills
Jan
31
answered Touch the blue paper
Jan
31
awarded  Critic
Jan
30
comment What does 'Become a scarlet letter' mean for a Senator who took advantage of the ‘Tea Party’ wave in the mid-term election?
This delves into some off-topic reasoning and it quickly becomes objective, but I will attempt to explain. The "Tea Party" is generally seen as a more extremist group of Republicans. Even though they are in the same general political party as other Republicans, the fact that they are seen as more extremist can change people's opinions. People who believe in the Tea Party will think positively about the affiliation, but people who are Republican but think the Tea Party is too extreme for Republican views may see such associations as bad ones.
Jan
30
comment What does 'Become a scarlet letter' mean for a Senator who took advantage of the ‘Tea Party’ wave in the mid-term election?
The implied meaning is a little more specific than "negative effect". :)
Jan
30
comment What does “scratch below the surface” mean?
I agree that the original idiom was "scratch the surface". I also know that, if you search for it, you'll find many usages of this new form. It may be a juxtaposition of existing idioms, but it's one with increasing usage nonetheless. I also think arguing that you can't literally perform an action in an idiom is kind of moot considering idioms aren't meant to be taken literally, but instead figuratively. Regardless of whether you can literally scratch below the surface of something, the figurative meaning of the idiom still stands.
Jan
30
comment What does “scratch below the surface” mean?
I would be happy to entertain other idiomatic meanings if you can find citations/examples.
Jan
30
answered What does “scratch below the surface” mean?
Jan
30
answered What does 'Become a scarlet letter' mean for a Senator who took advantage of the ‘Tea Party’ wave in the mid-term election?
Jan
29
answered Pejorative terms for children or teenagers using the Internet
Jan
29
awarded  Enlightened