792 reputation
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bio website your-translations.com
location
age 38
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Nov 6 at 5:59

Jan
21
awarded  Yearling
Jan
30
answered What is it called when I see another person in the mirror when there is only me
Jan
30
answered When 'willing' is added, does this intensify or weaken the meaning of “I bet”?
Jan
30
comment “Optional machines to work with”
Can you give more detail about the type of machines? My gut feeling would be to go along with something shorter like: "Other tools", but it depends on the context.
Jan
30
comment “has”+perfect in reported speech of the future
The answer does explain why. The problem is that for some reason, you still don't get it, even though all the answers on the board say the same thing (can't use the future perfect because the action in the past compared to the moment of the retelling).
Jan
30
comment “has”+perfect in reported speech of the future
Upvote or downvote means that you KNOW the answer. Not a matter of "convincing" - if you don't KNOW, you have no business upvoting or downvoting. As for the action being in the future, nope. Look at the sequence: 1. You pronounce him dead, THEN 2. You tell him. What do you tell him? You tell him about the action in 1. 1 happens before 2, therefore 1 is in the past compared to 2. In your example, he has already been pronounced dead = future perfect is wrong. Future perfect describes an action that will be completed later: "By the time you get back home, you will have been pronounced dead".
Jan
29
comment “has”+perfect in reported speech of the future
@msh210 What's the point of asking a question if you are sure that your answer is correct? (and in this case, no, it isn't) The action in the reported speech is in the past compared to the time it is told. "I will tell him that he has been..." By the time you "tell him", the action of pronouncing him dead is in the past. You can specify that it is over (past perfect) or simply that it has happened between a point of time in the past and now (present perfect). In no case can you use the future perfect as it would imply the action isn't complete.
Jan
29
comment Why is “I refuse running” wrong?
@terdon dancing is not different from running... but go is a verb of movement, which is a special case: you can use the present participle with verbs which indicate movement. "I'll go running is ok" but "I decline running is not". Check the link in the answer.
Jan
29
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
29
answered “has”+perfect in reported speech of the future
Jan
29
answered Why is “I refuse running” wrong?
Jan
29
answered What is it called when people wrongly anticipate something and their actions eventually make it happen?
Jan
21
awarded  Yearling
Jan
21
comment Does the word “newbie” have a negative connotation?
@ruakh "informal: characteristic of or appropriate to ordinary, casual, or familiar use". It does not require the use of slang. There are varying degrees of everything, but whenever you address the reader with the second person, you are well within the informal territory.
Jan
21
comment Does the word “newbie” have a negative connotation?
@ruakh "Informal online business" doesn't mean that every word used in the copy has to be informal. A friendly and informal tone is not achieved just through the use of of buzzwords and slang, it is achieved through clear, easy to read copy, directly addressing the reader, jokes and personal references, non-politically correct statements, etc. "Are you new to..." is already informal. Compare with "information for new users" or "Introduction to...".
Jan
20
comment Does the word “newbie” have a negative connotation?
Is there a specific reason why using "newbie" would be better than "new" in that case? "Are you new to XYZ.com?" convey the same meaning and does not have the negative connotations that the word newbie may have for some people.
Jan
20
answered How to analyze lightly varying senses of adjective *very*
Jan
20
comment Word for person willing to argue contradictory things depending on what suits him
A "caprice" is characterized by being seemingly unmotivated. If a person changes his tune to suit his interest, it is motivated and therefore not capricious.
Jan
20
comment Word for person willing to argue contradictory things depending on what suits him
+1 for hypocrite, -1 for contrarian.