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Dec
10
answered Is there a word or phrase for the time taken to become productive?
Dec
10
comment Is there a word or phrase for the time taken to become productive?
Is the word prepare appropriate? "The meeting was scheduled for 10am, but it took some people 5 minutes to prepare."
Dec
10
comment Is “originally first” a grammar error?
But then somebody realized that it was actually first invented many centuries prior to that? There is nothing grammatically incorrect about it and one could also argue that isn't redundant as well. Being redundant does not make a sentence ungrammatical. In poor style perhaps.
Dec
10
comment What is a cross-nibbed pen?
I thought these were called fountain pens.
Dec
10
comment “Not” or “not” in book title?
Not is definitely an important word. Have you ever written something down and mistakenly omitted the not? Oh, the regrets!
Dec
10
comment “Not” or “not” in book title?
Is there an example of a title with a, an or the as the last word and where it is still just an article? I can think of the band name The The, but that is no longer an article, is it? Or even to at the end?
Dec
10
comment Adjectives and nouns position: before or after?
Technically speaking, your first example is noun-preposition-noun and your second is adjective-noun. In English, the adjective usually precedes the noun as in chocolate cake, pretty face, rough voice, etc. Out of these examples you could say cake of chocolate but not face of pretty or voice of rough because those adjectives cannot double as nouns.
Dec
10
comment What's the word or phrase for “reading strategy/orientation”?
I would suggest refraining from selecting a correct answer within only a few hours. You might get better answers if it takes days.
Dec
10
answered What's the word or phrase for “reading strategy/orientation”?
Dec
10
comment including or included?
In the second case it would be an adjective. It describes yourself (a noun). But I'd agree with @medica's point. Many adjectives can resemble past tense verbs.
Dec
10
comment Word that means having eaten one's fill
This sounds more than full to me.
Nov
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
25
revised What's a common phrase that means “To put it simply though not 100% correctly”?
edited body
Nov
25
awarded  Yearling
Nov
25
answered What's a common phrase that means “To put it simply though not 100% correctly”?
Nov
24
comment Word for a task which is flawed or doomed to failure but which you have to do anyway?
Futile perhaps, but this doesn't imply failure to me.
Nov
8
comment Can “nepotist” mean the recipient of nepotism?
@Dan Brown, those are definitions for "nepotism". it is not completely clear in any of those sources who the "nepotist" is. I believe it could refer to either.
Nov
7
comment What is a saying for someone who does good in the street, but is bad at home?
I think the OPs question might not be referring to someone superficial. They could legitimately have more care out of the home because of their priorities.
Nov
7
comment Do any people distinguish between “analog” and “analogue”?
The Canadian half of me completely agrees with your distinction, but the British half of me also wants to say that they are alternative spellings for both senses.
Nov
4
comment What do you call a sick person who is lying in bed?
I don't agree with the bad connotations. It only means one thing: sick enough to be stuck in bed. I feel "bedridden" is definitely the most appropriate answer.